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Evaluation program

“These documents comprise the instrument that auditors will use to audit the U.S. Department of Justice's PREA Standards for Lockups.” Elements comprising this instrument are: “Pre-Audit Questionnaire”; “Auditor Compliance Tool” used to determine PREA compliance; “Instructions for PREA Audit Tour” of the facility; “Interview Protocols” for agency head or designee, facility director or designee, PREA Coordinator, specialized staff, random staff, and detainees: “Auditor Summary Report” template; “Process Map” describing the audit process from start to finish; and “Checklist of Documentation”.

PREA Audit Instrument – Lockups Cover

"This report summarizes the primary findings and recommendations from a pretrial analysis for Middlesex County, Massachusetts. Peter Koutoujian, Sheriff of Middlesex County acted on behalf of multiple justice system stakeholders in the county to request technical assistance to receive an analysis of the pretrial jail population, trend analysis and related practices. The purpose of which is to examine the possible causes of increasing numbers of pretrial defendants remaining in custody, leading to overcrowding and subsequent jail cap releases" (p. 4). Sections of this report include: Middlesex County overview; infrastructure; jail and pretrial process analysis; challenges and opportunities—coordination and collaborative decision-making, data driven decisions, risk informed, outcome measures, outcome focused, and deliberate and affirmative decisions; and seven recommendations. "This addendum to the December 2014 report is being prepared in response to questions and discussions that have occurred since its release … this new analysis does not invalidate the summary and conclusions of the original report. Specifically, the need for improved collaboration and coordination between the major stakeholders; the need to develop, maintain, and utilize system performance and outcome measures in driving policy, and the need to address case processing issues such as: risk-based versus money bail release decisions, and pretrial supervision and diversion options " (p. 2).

Pretrial Analysis for Middlesex County, Massachusetts Technical Assistance Report and Addendum cover

"[D]irection to tribal jurisdictions interested in conducting a justice system assessment for the purposes of addressing systemic issues raised in the development of detention and correctional facilities" is provided (p. 7). This guide is comprised of the following sections: introduction; what a justice assessment is; impact of the justice system assessment on detention and corrections bed space needs; approach to conducting a system assessment; steps in the assessment process; unique characteristics of Indian Country justice systems; summary; key parties in the tribal justice system; and structure of tribal justice systems.

Project Guide: Tribal Justice System Assessment Cover

Highlights of this Office's accomplishments and the status of correctional job training and placement in the U.S. are provided. Contents of this report include: foreword; introduction; background; activities and accomplishments -- office coordination, interagency coordination, public presentations, national telecast, information exchange activities, cooperative agreements, technical assistance, training, clearinghouse/information services, news articles, and purchase of copyright release privileges; and status of U.S. correctional job training and placement programs. An appendix provides an evaluation of academy-based, distance learning, and partnership training programs.

Report to the United States Congress Cover

An overview is presented of findings (as of July 2011) regarding “a comprehensive list of programs and policies that improve … outcomes for children and adults in Washington and result in more cost-efficient use of public resources” (p. 1). Sections comprising this report are: summary; background; the four-step research approach that assesses what works, calculates costs and benefits and ranks options, measures the risks associated with the analysis, and estimates the impact of various option combinations on statewide outcomes. Also included are two Technical Appendixes that provide in-depth results.

Return on Investment: Evidence-Based Options to Improve Statewide Outcomes--July 2011 Update cover

The effectiveness of domestic violence courts to positively impact court processing, case resolutions, and recidivism is examined. If you are planning to implement a domestic violence court in your jurisdiction or are looking for ways to improve it, then you should read this report. This study found that court policies “varied widely across several domains, including specific accountability measures (i.e., use of various sanctions for noncompliance), victim safety and services (e.g., use of protection orders, linkages to victim advocates, and courthouse safety measures), use of offender assessment tools, orders to batterer programs, and orders to other types of programs (e.g., substance abuse or mental health treatment)” (p. v). Findings also show that among convicted offenders domestic violence courts significantly reduce the total number of re-arrests for any charge and for additional domestic violence charges.

Testing the Effects of New York’s Domestic Violence Courts: A Statewide Impact Evaluation Cover

This article is essential reading for those individuals involved with juvenile justice reform. “Pre- and postcharge diversion programs have been used as a formal intervention strategy for youth offenders since the 1970s. This meta-analysis was conducted to shed some light on whether diversion reduces recidivism at a greater rate than traditional justice system processing and to explore aspects of diversion programs associated with greater reductions in recidivism” (p. 497). Sections cover: formats of diversion programs; relevant theoretical and empirical developments; methodology; results according to the impact of variables in recidivism (intervention programs involving some formal conditions) and caution or warning programs (involving no further action besides the caution); discussion; and implications and future directions for researchers and for program developers. This study found that diversion programs for youth are significantly more successful than traditional juvenile justice systems in reducing recidivism, with programs focusing on medium to high-risk youth being more effective than those targeting low-risk offenders.

The Effect of Youth Diversion Programs on Recidivism: A Meta-Analytic Review Cover

Anyone involved with programming for incarcerated youth should read this report. It can be used to bolster ones attempt to develop family visitation programs in your agency. The positive impact of family visitation on the behavior and school performance of incarcerated youth is examined. The number of behavioral incidents decreased as visits increased. School performance for those who had frequent visits was 4.6 points higher than those youth who were not visited. “Despite the benefits of family contact for youth, families often face significant barriers when visiting incarcerated loved ones. Preliminary findings from this project revealed that distance was a significant barrier to visitation; youth who were placed far from home were less likely to receive an in-person visit while incarcerated. Because there are many factors involved when making placement decisions, facilities can benefit immensely by changing their visitation policies to encourage frequent contact between family and incarcerated youth” (p. 4).

The Impact of Family Visitation on Incarcerated Youth’s Behavior and School Performance: Findings from the Families as Partners Project Cover

"TJC [Transition from Jail to Community] represents an integrated approach spanning organizational boundaries to deliver needed information, services, and case management to people released from jail. Boundary-spanning collaborative partnerships are necessary because transition from jail to the community is neither the sole responsibility of the jail nor of the community. Accordingly, effective transition strategies rely on collaboration among jail- and community-based partners and joint ownership of the problems associated with jail transition and their solutions. The TJC model includes the components necessary to carry out systems change to facilitate successful transition from jail, and it is intended be sufficiently adaptable that it can be implemented in any of the 2,860 jail jurisdictions in the United States … despite how greatly they vary in terms of size, resources, and priorities … One of NIC’s goals for Phase 2 of the TJC Initiative was to enhance the TJC model and approach to pay greater attention to pretrial practices … Findings from the Phase 2 process and systems change evaluation are provided in individual site-specific case study reports that focus on how TJC implementation unfolded in the specific context of each participating jurisdiction … While the TJC Model provides a common framework for TJC work, site priorities, preexisting collaborative relationships, capacity to carry out reentry activities (and where that capacity resides), and site starting points condition how TJC proceeds. However, common themes emerged across the Phase 2 sites, as well as insight into why greater progress was realized in some places more than others. The purpose of this brief is to summarize these themes and relevant information about the sites’ implementation experiences—what worked well, what was notable, and what was challenging (p. 3, 5-6, Phase 2 Summary).

Seven reports comprise the Transition from Jail to Community (TJC) Initiative Phase 2 Site Reports series:

Phase 2 Summary Implementation Findings by Jesse Jannetta, Janeen Buck Willison, and Emma Kurs has these sections: glossary; site implementation themes—leadership and collaboration; targeted intervention strategies; self-evaluation and sustainability; and lessons for changing systems.

Implementation Success and Challenges in Ada County, Idaho by Shebani Rao, Kevin Warwick, Gary Christensen, and Colleen Owens;
Implementation Success and Challenges in Franklin County, Massachusetts by Willison, Warwick, and Rao; Implementation Success and Challenges in Fresno County, California by Jannetta, Rao, Owens, and Christensen; Implementation Success and Challenges in Hennepin County, Minnesota by Willison, Warwick, and Kurs; Implementation Success and Challenges in Howard County, Maryland by Jannetta, Kurs, and Owens; and Implementation Success and Challenges in Jacksonville, Florida by Willison, Warwick, Kurs, and Christensen.

Each of the above six Site Reports contain these sections ; glossary; introduction; TJC structure, leadership, and collaboration; targeted intervention strategies; self-evaluation and sustainability; and conclusion.

Transition from Jail to Community Cover

"This is a report of the evaluation study conducted to examine the effects of the Victim Impact: Listen and Learn program on the behaviors of the prisoners who attended this program. The focus of the data we collected and reported on was on the participants’ behaviors after attending the program but while still in prison, and upon release from prison … The central tenet of the program is that a vital component to facilitating change within an individual offender is a focus on the victims of crime, and the impact of a crime on the victim" (p. 1). Victim Impact has been implemented in the Delaware prison system since 2011. Some of the findings form this study include: participants has a recidivism rate (re-offense and re-commitment) of 35 % compared to 67% for non-participants; and participants had a 33% reduction in disciplinary charges. Thus, Victim Impact reduces recidivism and can provide significant cost savings.

Victim Impact: Listen and Learn: An Evaluation of the Effects of the Victim Impact: Listen and Learn Program on Prisoner Recidivism and Prisoner Behavior cover

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