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Facility design and construction

The process of building community support for a new jail is explained. Sections comprising this bulletin include: the challenge; raising the issue; increasing public awareness; going public with the problem; building a case or support; a picture is worth a thousand words; going public with the information; elements of a case for support; developing campaign strategies; potential stakeholders; case study -- when impact assessments go right and wrong; case study -- a multilevel strategy for a complex situation; case study -- a cautious approach to an unusual situation; case study -- preparing to meet the editorial board; tactics; case study -- using video to contrast the old and the new; case study -- outreach via public access television; case study -- promoting the project website; case study -- surveys as two-way information pipelines; putting it all together -- one community's experience; case study -- making the most of a community meeting; responding to public input; and conclusion.

Building Community Support for New Jail Construction Cover

A facility development process plan is provided. Process phases are noted along the top of this flowchart: project recognition, needs assessment, go—no go, design, bidding, go—no go, construction, occupancy, and post occupancy. Elements occupying different places in the phases are listed on the side—tasks and then process tracks of non facility alternatives, transition, site, capital and operational funding, project delivery method, outcomes, professional services acquisition, and building support for the project.

Facility Development Process Cover

In this compilation of three documents, critical elements to include in a needs assessment and planning services RFP and an architectural planning and design RFP or RFQ (Request for Qualifications) are identified. Issuing a separate RFP for needs assessment and facility planning services instead of combining this RFP with an RFP for architectural services is because "functional programming dictates facility design" (p. 2). Each document contains an overview of RFP content, checklist questions, and a sample.

Facility Development: Needs Assessment & Pre-Design Planning RFP Checklist Cover

This bulletin "discusses how jurisdictions of all sizes can consider and address the gender-specific needs of female inmates during the facility planning process." Sections contained in this bulletin are: introduction; the female inmate population; the impact of jail size; target population; predesign issues; master planning; prearchitectural programming; consider a regional approach; design issues; and a last word -- this publication focuses on facility planning not program and service development.

Facility Planning to Meet the Needs of Female Inmates Cover

This guide is currently being to revised through a cooperative with National Criminal Justice Association (NCJA).

“This guide describes for county administrators and other local officials why staff is needed, who becomes good staff, how many staff persons are needed, what the costs are to develop a staff and how staff can be funded, where staff can be found, how the best applicants can be selected, where staff are best housed in the system, and how staff can be trained and evaluated. The guide also offers practical advice for planning staff by describing important activities to do when starting in the position, major roles and responsibilities, and activities to perform as the criminal justice coordinating committee (CJCC) identifies and resolves systemwide issues” (p. xi). Four chapters follow an executive summary: introduction—the need for local planning and coordination with the criminal justice coordinating committee (CJCC) and staff being the solution; obtaining criminal justice planning staff—how the CCJC can hire the best person for the job since the abilities of CJCC staff are very different from other justice system planners; suggestions for the criminal justice planning staff—the major roles they must fulfill; and regional networks of local criminal justice planning functions—the need for networking and collaboration among staff or other committees to achieve better outcomes than by doing it alone. Appendixes provide: a sample Criminal Justice Planner/Analyst job description; and sample mission, vision, and values for criminal justice planning staff or unit.

Guidelines for Staffing a Local Criminal Justice Coordinating Committee Cover

The Constitution protects inmates in jails and prisons, and this paper discusses the continuing challenge of deciding what those protections mean in practice and the struggle to assure that inmate rights are met. "Condition cases" have resulted in courts reducing jail populations and have a great impact on facility design and operation and the cost of operating a jail. Legal issues whose impact are primarily operational are also highlighted. The title: Jails and the Constitution: An Overview (#022570) supersedes this title.

Jail Design and Operation and the Constitution: An Overview cover

This guide “discusses current correctional standards and architectural principles that are important to building a cost-efficient jail to meet a locality’s particular needs” (p. xix). It will be highly useful for anyone involved in the planning, design, and construction of a new jail. Chapters are divided into four parts - getting started, major design considerations, functional components, and special considerations – and include: introduction; predesign planning; site selection and design; image and appearance; classification and separation; surveillance and supervision; staffing impact; security perimeter; criminal justice interface; functional components and relationships; planning and designing to standards; expansion; master control; intake-release; general housing; special housing; health care; visiting areas; exercise areas; programs and services; inmate commissary; food service; laundry areas; administration and public areas; staff areas; storage areas; single versus multiple occupancy; renovating nonsecure buildings into jails; construction and project costs; and making a building work.

Jail Design Guide Cover

Addresses architectural design as it relates to functional components of the jail, discusses overall design considerations, and reviews pre-design planning, renovation, construction costs, and facility transition.

Jail Design Guide: A Resource for Small and Medium-Sized Jails cover

A tool for reviewing conceptual options and schematic designs for new or renovated jails is presented. Five chapters make up this handbook: introduction and overview; the jurisdiction's involvement throughout the planning and design process; how to read architects' drawings; checklists; and conclusion and next steps.

Jail Design Review Handbook cover

This publication should be the first that elected officials and other policymakers turn to when developing jail facilities--either a new jail or expansion of an existing jail. All the participants’ roles, decisions they make, and the documents resulting from the process are covered. Sections of this manual explain: what the facility development process is; who the participants in the decision are; what types of decisions must be made; how much time and money are spent on each phase; and the nine phases with their respective tasks and track activities. A facility development process flowchart is also included.

Jail Planning and Expansion: Local Officials and Their Roles cover

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