Back to top

Federal prison system

This report provides "annual data on workload, activities, and outcomes associated with federal criminal cases. Information is acquired on all aspects of processing in the federal justice system, including the number of persons investigated, prosecuted, convicted, incarcerated, sentenced to probation, released pretrial, and under parole or other supervision; initial prosecution decisions, referrals to magistrates, court dispositions, sentencing outcomes, sentence length, and time served. The program collects data from the Executive Office for U.S. Attorneys (EOUSA), the Pretrial Services Agency (PSA), the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts (AO), the U.S. Sentencing Commission (USSC), and the Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP). "

Federal Justice Statistics, 2011 - Statistical Tables Cover

This report describes "the annual activity, workloads, and outcomes associated with the federal criminal justice system from arrest to imprisonment, using data from the U.S. Marshals Service (USMS), Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Executive Office for U.S. Attorneys (EOUSA), Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts (AOUSC), and Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP). Tables and text describe arrests and investigations by law enforcement agency and growth rates by type of offense and federal judicial district. This report examines trends in drug arrests by the DEA. It also provides the number of offenders returning to federal prison within 3 years of release and includes the most recently available data on sentences imposed and their lengths by type of offense".

Federal Justice Statistics, 2012 - Statistical Tables Cover

This manual provides practical guidelines for administrators and chaplains to appropriately accommodate inmate religious beliefs and practices. It addresses specific observance issues, provides historical and theological background information, and identifies additional resources. Fourteen religious traditions are covered: Buddhism, Eastern Rite Catholicism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, Moorish Science Temple of America, National of Islam, Native American, Odinism/Asatru, Protestant Christianity, Rastfari, Roman Catholic Christianity, Sikh Dharma, and Wicca.

Inmate Religious Beliefs and Practices TRM  Cover

This presentation provides an introductory overview to the masjid (prayer hall or mosque) and the religious worship of Islam and guidance for accommodating Muslim belief and practices in correctional facilities.

Islam's Place and Practice of Worship in the Correctional Environment Cover

"This publication is intended to serve as a guide to relevant statutes, regulations, policy documents, and current case law concerning issues the BOP faces today. It provides a general overview of the BOP, its services, and its programs" (p. 1). Sections of this document include: introduction; pretrial issues; evaluation of offender mental capacity; sentencing issues—probation and conditions of probation, imprisonment, and judgment in a criminal case; post-conviction issues—designation to a facility for service of a term of imprisonment, admission and orientation program for inmates, programs and general services, visiting, telephones, and correspondence, inmate discipline procedure, inmate access to court, administrative remedy program, personal property, inmate liens, special administrative measures, family emergencies and temporary releases, release, and notification to community of the release of an offender; and conclusion.

Legal Resource Guide to the Federal Bureau of Prisons Cover

Millbrook was being held in the custody of the U.S. Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) when she was sexually assaulted. She contends that sovereign immunity does not apply to the officers in this instance since the Federal Tort Claims Act (FTCA) waives their immunity. The Supreme Court agreed that the FTCA allows for suits to be brought against federal law enforcement officers for committing intentional torts during the performance of their jobs. This judgement will positively impact the ability of federal inmates to file lawsuits against federal officers who commit sexual attacks in federal correctional facilities.

Millbrook v. United States, Certiorari to the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit Cover

"A growing body of evidence suggests that the overuse of solitary confinement and other forms of restrictive housing in U.S. correctional systems undermines public safety and is contrary to our Nation's values … a final report [was] transmitted to me [President Obama] on January 25, 2016 (DOJ Report and Recommendations Concerning the Use of Restrictive Housing) (the "DOJ Report") at https://justice.gov/restrictivehousing, that sets forth specific policy recommendations for DOJ with respect to the Federal Bureau of Prisons and other DOJ entities as well as more general guiding principles for all correctional systems. As the DOJ Report makes clear, although occasions exist when correctional officials have no choice but to segregate inmates from the general population, this action has the potential to cause serious, long-lasting harm. The DOJ Report accordingly emphasizes the responsibility of Government to ensure that this practice is limited, applied with constraints, and used only as a measure of last resort. Given the urgency and importance of this issue, it is critical that DOJ accelerate efforts to reduce the number of Federal inmates and detainees held in restrictive housing and that Federal correctional and detention systems be models for facilities across the United States." Directions for the swift implementation of the DOJ Report's recommendations for addressing the overuse of solitary confinement in correctional and detention systems in the United States are organized into to three sections: Sec. 1--Implementation of the DOJ Report; Sec. 2-- General Provisions; and Sec. 3--Publication.

Presidential Memorandum -- Limiting the Use of Restrictive Housing by the Federal Government Cover

This monograph presents a review of the literature and of national and state standards for prison suicide prevention, as well as national data on the incidence and rate of prison suicide, effective prevention programs, and discussion of liability issues. Topics also discussed include staff training, intake screening/assessment, housing, levels of supervision, intervention and administrative review. The document also examines the role of the courts in shaping prison suicide policy.

Prison Suicide: An Overview and Guide to Prevention Cover

“Presented before a House of Representatives briefing sponsored by Rep. Jared Polis of Colorado on September 13, 2012, [this report] … chronicles the May 2012 Adams County Correctional Center uprising in Natchez, Mississippi, a private for-profit facility operated by Corrections Corporation of America [CCA], under contract with the Federal Bureau of Prisons.” Sections of this publication address: how lucrative federal prison contracts enrich Wall Street corporations; deadly conditions; the route to a for-profit private prison in Mississippi; prison health care disaster; May 20, 2012—the prisoner uprising; FBI investigation—prisoners were protesting mistreatment—lack of adequate food and health care, and abuse by guards; another private prison under contract with the BOP had similar problems—GEO at Pecos, Texas; a brief history if prison privatization in the U.S.; the industry’s close ties to politicians and public officials; the bubble breaks for the private prison market; a case in point—CCA at Youngstown, Ohio; the private prison industry bubble reinflates after 9/11; a convoy of CARS (criminal alien requirements) arrives just in time to rescue CCA from bankruptcy; the CARS lurch forward; and the post-9/11 crackdown on immigrants trumps unfavorable findings regarding substandard conditions in private prisons.

› Privately Operated Federal Prisons for Immigrants: Expensive. Unsafe. Unneccessary Cover

This document intends to “provide a written policy that implements zero tolerance toward all forms of sexual activity, including sexual abuse and sexual harassment, and to provide guidelines to address the following prohibited and/or illegal sexually abusive behavior involving: Inmate perpetrator against staff victim; Inmate perpetrator against inmate victim; [and] Staff perpetrator against inmate victim. This policy also covers incidents involving contractors and volunteers. These guidelines are provided to: Help detect incidents, perpetrators, and inmate victims of sexually abusive behavior; Help prevent sexually abusive behavior; Educate staff to intervene properly and in a timely manner; Document, report, and investigate reported incidents; [and] Discipline and/or prosecute perpetrators” (p. 1). Procedures explain: prevention planning; responsive planning; training and education; screening for risk of sexual victimization and abusiveness; reporting; official response following an inmate report; investigations; discipline; medical and mental care; data collection and review; and audits. Also attached is the “PREA Intake Objective Screening Instrument”.

Sexually Abusive Behavior Prevention and Intervention Program Cover

Pages

Subscribe to Federal prison system