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Female offenders

The “most effective ways to meet the needs of returning female offenders” are explained (p.1). This report has these sections: overview; presentations—foundations of effective service; discussions—highlights and themes; going forward; and conclusion.

Women and Reentry: Foundations for Success Cover

This training program presents strategies for making women offender workplace development programs more responsive to their clients. Topics include:

  • Emerging evidence-based gender responsive practices
  • Information strategies and case management models
  • Career theories and assessment tools
  • Collaborative relationships that support effective reentry
  • How a history of criminal convictions impacts job search efforts
  • Women Offender Case Management Model (WOCMM)
  • Strengths and needs of female offenders
  • Motivational interviewing & relational language
  • Transitional and social learning theories
  • What is in it for the system and staff
  • Pains of imprisonment
  • Assessment classification and gender responsive tools
  • Examples of best practices
  • And more.
Women and Work: Gender Responsivity and Workforce Development Cover

Individuals who want an up-to-date understanding of gender-responsive issues and all those who work with female offenders should read this document report. It “outlines the risks faced by women deprived of their liberty of being subjected to torture and ill-treatment and measures that can be taken to reduce such risks. The main focus of the paper is the situation of women in detention in the criminal justice system, though the discussion is in many cases equally relevant to women deprived of liberty in other contexts, such as psychiatric institutions and immigration detention facilities” (p. 3). Sections contained in this document include: introduction to gender-specific treatment; why monitoring bodies should look at this issue; concepts—gender and gender mainstreaming, and discrimination and violence against women; risk factors and measures to reduce risk—certain contexts which heighten risk, certain times that heighten risk, certain policies and practices that heighten risk or cause physical or mental suffering, and certain categories of women who are at heightened risk(girls, victims of human trafficking and sex workers, women with mental healthcare needs, and other groups; and the qualities monitoring bodies need to be effective in this endeavor.

Women in Detention: A Guide to Gender-Sensitive Monitoring Cover

Individuals who want an up-to-date understanding of gender-responsive issues and all those who work with female offenders should read this document report. "It outlines the risks faced by women deprived of their liberty of being subjected to torture and ill-treatment and measures that can be taken to reduce such risks. The main focus of the paper is the situation of women in detention in the criminal justice system, though the discussion is in many cases equally relevant to women deprived of liberty in other contexts, such as psychiatric institutions and immigration detention facilities.” (p. 2). Sections contained in this document include: introduction to gender-specific treatment; why monitoring bodies should look at this issue; concepts—gender and gender mainstreaming, and discrimination and violence against women; risk factors and measures to reduce risk—certain contexts which heighten risk, certain times that heighten risk, certain policies and practices that heighten risk or cause physical or mental suffering, and certain categories of women who are at heightened risk (girls, victims of human trafficking and sex workers, women with mental healthcare needs, and other groups); and the qualities monitoring bodies need to engage in this endeavor.

Women in Detention: A Guide to Gender-Sensitive Monitoring|Second edition Cover

The authors examine issues related to classification of female jail inmates by profiling the female inmate population and discussing problems associated with using a single classification system for both male and female inmates or a gender-neutral system. This document also provides guidelines for designing a classification system specifically for women.

Women in Jail: Classification Issues Cover

The gender-responsive Women Offender Case Management Model (WOCMM) is described. This document covers: the history of the project; philosophy and core practices; process incorporating four core elements (e.g., engage and assess, enhance motivation, implement the case plan, and review progress); preparing for implementation; and evaluation.

Women Offender Case Management Model Cover

This paper describes assessments of female offenders used by correctional agencies and the programs and resources provided by these agencies to meet female offenders' needs. "The two, assessments and programs/services go together. The assessments tell us what is needed and the programs address identified needs" (p. 43). Topics discussed include: gender-responsive risk assessments and the risk factors they identify; women's pathways to crime—child abuse pathway, relational pathway, and the social and human capital pathway; mental health, self-esteem and self-efficacy, and parental stress; risk factors by correctional setting—prisons, pre-release, and probation; translating the gender-specific research into practice; interventions for women offender populations; and the Gender-Informed Practices Assessment (GIPA) 12 domains.

Women's Risk Factors and New Treatments/Interventions for Addressing Them: Evidence-Based Interventions in the United States and Canada Cover

This presentation is a very good introduction for the impact of trauma on female offenders, and the need for justice-informed practices. It may be from Canada, but it speaks to all of the issues facing female trauma and incarceration in the United States. Topics discussed include: why trauma is an important issue; defining trauma; vicarious trauma; trauma-informed practices; voices of trauma—a call for help; triggers and trauma reactions; trauma-informed versus trauma-specific; where trauma-informed practices should be used; guidelines for trauma-informed practices in women's substance use services; trauma-informed vs. not trauma-informed; pathways to trauma-informed practices; and future directions.

Women Trauma and Incarceration cover

“Women who are battered by their partners are everywhere – and that includes in your local jail. Unfortunately, in many communities, jailed women are quite invisible, even to battered women’s organizations. If you are not already doing so, we want you (and other community-based advocates) to work with jailed women. Since you are reading this manual, we assume you are interested in doing work with jailed battered women, or are already doing so … Working with jailed women can be complicated and difficult. Since the women have open criminal charges or are serving sentences (and still may have open legal issues), the stakes are high. We hope this manual will encourage and guide you in thinking about ways of being thoughtful and strategic about how you approach your work with jailed battered women” (p. 1). Sections of this guide include: introduction; battered women in jail; before you begin—things to consider; defense-based advocacy; confidentiality; jail-based advocacy; overcoming barriers; advocacy fundamentals with battered women in jails; special considerations; individual advocacy; group advocacy; systems advocacy; and closing. Also included is “Advocacy Basics for Working With Battered Women Charged With Crimes.”

Working With Battered Women in Jail: A Manual for Community-Based Battered Women’s Advocates Cover

"Although women and girls in the criminal justice system account for a small percentage of the overall incarcerated population, that number is growing at an alarming rate. Presenters provide an overview of emerging research regarding what works for women and girls who have been involved in the criminal justice system. This session discusses how best practices for working with women and girls during incarceration and throughout the reentry continuum have taken shape."

Working with Women and Girls: Gender-Responsive Treatment Strategies in Corrections Cover

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