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Female offenders

This webinar “discussed the current research and best practices related to the successful management and treatment of women in the criminal justice system … with a particular focus on behavioral health. The webinar also included a discussion about gender-specific criminogenic risk and need assessment tools, as well as the importance of responsivity for females." This website provides access to the presentation slides.

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"The TLC TIER (Trauma Informed Effective Reinforcement) System for Girls is a female responsive, research-based model that offers short-term detention and residential programs an effective alternative to compliance-focused behavior management systems. The TIER System for Girls teaches staff skills that are more effective in motivating positive behavior with girls than traditional points and level systems. This Webinar reviews the framework of the TIER System for Girls, and provides examples of processes and techniques that will establish a gender responsive, trauma-informed program culture. Learning Objectives: explore the elements of a trauma-informed, gender responsive system that promotes safe behavior in residential programs and detention facilities; learn about the importance of developing a gender responsive program culture/environment for girls; and discover how to engage girls and staff when improving elements of program culture/environment through real-life examples. This website provides access to a recording of the webinar, presentation slides, speakers' transcript, and a transcript of chat questions and answers.

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"All crime data have flaws, but sexual assault data are notoriously inaccurate. Why are these data so problematic? And what are the consequences for how we address sexual violence in the United States? Data on rape and sexual assault suffer from inconsistent estimates and underreporting, leading to misunderstandings about the extent of the problem and adequate policy solutions. Let’s look at two major sources of information on the topic: survey-based studies that estimate prevalence of sexual assaults and criminal justice system data. In this post, we look at data on female victims of sexual violence, since most existing reports and statistics focus on women. Data on sexual assault against men are especially sparse; we know even less about the experiences of male victims" (p. 1). Sections cover: two different surveys, two different stories—National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) and the National Intimate Partner Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS); and why criminal justice data can be misleading.

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This brief describes the accomplishments to date and agenda moving forward for this group. “The Cabinet-level Reentry Council is working to enhance community safety and well-being, assist those returning from prison and jail becoming productive citizens, and save taxpayers dollars by lowering the direct and collateral costs of incarceration” (p. 1).

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The “most effective ways to meet the needs of returning female offenders” are explained (p.1). This report has these sections: overview; presentations—foundations of effective service; discussions—highlights and themes; going forward; and conclusion.

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This training program presents strategies for making women offender workplace development programs more responsive to their clients. Topics include:

  • Emerging evidence-based gender responsive practices
  • Information strategies and case management models
  • Career theories and assessment tools
  • Collaborative relationships that support effective reentry
  • How a history of criminal convictions impacts job search efforts
  • Women Offender Case Management Model (WOCMM)
  • Strengths and needs of female offenders
  • Motivational interviewing & relational language
  • Transitional and social learning theories
  • What is in it for the system and staff
  • Pains of imprisonment
  • Assessment classification and gender responsive tools
  • Examples of best practices
  • And more.
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Individuals who want an up-to-date understanding of gender-responsive issues and all those who work with female offenders should read this document report. It “outlines the risks faced by women deprived of their liberty of being subjected to torture and ill-treatment and measures that can be taken to reduce such risks. The main focus of the paper is the situation of women in detention in the criminal justice system, though the discussion is in many cases equally relevant to women deprived of liberty in other contexts, such as psychiatric institutions and immigration detention facilities” (p. 3). Sections contained in this document include: introduction to gender-specific treatment; why monitoring bodies should look at this issue; concepts—gender and gender mainstreaming, and discrimination and violence against women; risk factors and measures to reduce risk—certain contexts which heighten risk, certain times that heighten risk, certain policies and practices that heighten risk or cause physical or mental suffering, and certain categories of women who are at heightened risk(girls, victims of human trafficking and sex workers, women with mental healthcare needs, and other groups; and the qualities monitoring bodies need to be effective in this endeavor.

Women in Detention: A Guide to Gender-Sensitive Monitoring Cover

Individuals who want an up-to-date understanding of gender-responsive issues and all those who work with female offenders should read this document report. "It outlines the risks faced by women deprived of their liberty of being subjected to torture and ill-treatment and measures that can be taken to reduce such risks. The main focus of the paper is the situation of women in detention in the criminal justice system, though the discussion is in many cases equally relevant to women deprived of liberty in other contexts, such as psychiatric institutions and immigration detention facilities.” (p. 2). Sections contained in this document include: introduction to gender-specific treatment; why monitoring bodies should look at this issue; concepts—gender and gender mainstreaming, and discrimination and violence against women; risk factors and measures to reduce risk—certain contexts which heighten risk, certain times that heighten risk, certain policies and practices that heighten risk or cause physical or mental suffering, and certain categories of women who are at heightened risk (girls, victims of human trafficking and sex workers, women with mental healthcare needs, and other groups); and the qualities monitoring bodies need to engage in this endeavor.

Women in Detention: A Guide to Gender-Sensitive Monitoring|Second edition Cover

The authors examine issues related to classification of female jail inmates by profiling the female inmate population and discussing problems associated with using a single classification system for both male and female inmates or a gender-neutral system. This document also provides guidelines for designing a classification system specifically for women.

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The gender-responsive Women Offender Case Management Model (WOCMM) is described. This document covers: the history of the project; philosophy and core practices; process incorporating four core elements (e.g., engage and assess, enhance motivation, implement the case plan, and review progress); preparing for implementation; and evaluation.

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