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Female offenders

"This bibliography attempts to offer a compilation of information on trauma-informed care by reviewing general information about trauma as well as focusing on the criminal justice system and corrections (women, adults, and younger people), peer support, and screening/assessment for trauma. In addition, definitions of many of these tools are provided" (p. 3). Eighty-four resources are organized into the following areas: trauma-informed care in general; trauma-informed care in the criminal justice system and in corrections; trauma-informed care for youth in the criminal justice system; peer-to-peer trauma-informed care; trauma; gender neutral screenings and assessments; and trauma and/or gender informed screenings and assessments.

Trauma Annotated Bibliography Cover

“In the past decade, it has become increasingly clear that addressing trauma requires a multi-agency, multi-pronged approach. Public education, prevention, early identification, and effective trauma assessment and treatment are all necessary to break the cycle of trauma and violence. Significant progress has been made in creating organizational cultures based on knowledge of trauma and its impact (“trauma-informed approaches”), strategies to prevent or reduce rates of violence and trauma, and effective treatment interventions (“trauma-specific treatments”). Trauma-informed approaches are particularly suited to collaborative strategies because they transcend traditional organizational boundaries and professional roles, providing a common framework for working together. This document reflects how the Federal Partners Committee on Women and Trauma’s efforts to promote, adopt, and implement trauma-informed approaches have enhanced the effectiveness of a wide range of government services and supports. It also demonstrates the impact of the Committee’s coordinated cross-agency efforts” (p. 7-8). The twenty-four U.S. federal groups are from the Department of Defense (DOD), Department of Education (ED), Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), Department of Justice (DOJ), Department of Labor, Department of Veterans Affairs (DVA), the Peace Corps, and the White House Office on National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP).

Trauma-Informed Approaches: Federal Activities and Initiatives: A Working Document, Second Report Cover

Concerns with the U.S. Preventative Services Task Force's (USPSTF) recommendations for mammogram breast cancer screening and how these could impact prison screening mammography in prisons are explained. Sections of this article cover: what the USPSTF suggested for mammograms; what evidence the USPSTF reviewed; whether other respected organizations came to the similar conclusions after reviewing the evidence as USPSTF did; what the benefit is of screening mammography in women aged 40-49; what the harms of mammography are—false positives and overdiagnosis; types of breast cancers; putting it all together—comparing benefit to harm—women only need to have a screening mammogram every other year starting at age 50 (biennial exams will "reduce the harms of overdiagnosis by 50% but will preserve 80% of the benefits"), yet ultimately leaving the decision to those women under 50; and the complexity of issuing screening mammograms to female inmates.

Understanding Breast Cancer Screening Recommendations Cover

The "use of jail exit surveys as an effective data collection tool for creating [a] picture of the characteristics of women in contact with the local jail" is described (p. 1). Sections of this bulletin are: introduction; how one jurisdiction used data to inform responses to women offenders; reasons for conducting a jail exit survey; what a jail exit survey entails; tips for getting started; designing a jail exit survey; understanding jail exit survey information; comprehensive listing of major data elements to include in a jail exit survey; and lessons learned. A sample questionnaire is also included.

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"In the wake of significant research on trauma and the interventions required to address it, a number of correctional agencies have made efforts to increase the use of trauma-based services and curricula … This document provides a brief overview of trauma and its effects on women offenders, and specifically defines trauma-informed practices for women’s correctional facilities.3 It also provides key actions that facility administrators, managers, and staff can take to better align their operational practices with the research on trauma and to create a more trauma-informed facility culture" (p. 1-2). This publication contains these sections: introduction; what we know about the experience of trauma among women inmates; trauma's impact on brain and body; what the prevalence of trauma among females means for women's correctional institutions; what the benefits of creating a more trauma-informed institutional culture are; creating a trauma-informed culture in women's correctional facilities; opportunities for implementing trauma-informed practices in correctional settings; eight action steps for building a trauma-informed facility culture; and conclusion.

Using Trauma-Informed Practices to Enhance Safety and Security in Women’s Correctional Facilities cover

This website provides access to TEDx videos given at the Washington Corrections Center for Women (WCCW) "Does Gender Matter" event on March 14, 2015. Topics range from the "Northern Cree Women's Honor Song" by the Broken Wing Center, "Tell Me You Don’t See" by Tiffany Williams, "Summon Your Courage" by Cathryn Cummings, "The Hard Stuff" by Felice Davis, "Judging Societie by Women's Prison" by Emily Salisbury, to "Coming to a Neighborhood Near Your" by Marriam Oliver". There are 21 talks.

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This webinar “discussed the current research and best practices related to the successful management and treatment of women in the criminal justice system … with a particular focus on behavioral health. The webinar also included a discussion about gender-specific criminogenic risk and need assessment tools, as well as the importance of responsivity for females." This website provides access to the presentation slides.

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"The TLC TIER (Trauma Informed Effective Reinforcement) System for Girls is a female responsive, research-based model that offers short-term detention and residential programs an effective alternative to compliance-focused behavior management systems. The TIER System for Girls teaches staff skills that are more effective in motivating positive behavior with girls than traditional points and level systems. This Webinar reviews the framework of the TIER System for Girls, and provides examples of processes and techniques that will establish a gender responsive, trauma-informed program culture. Learning Objectives: explore the elements of a trauma-informed, gender responsive system that promotes safe behavior in residential programs and detention facilities; learn about the importance of developing a gender responsive program culture/environment for girls; and discover how to engage girls and staff when improving elements of program culture/environment through real-life examples. This website provides access to a recording of the webinar, presentation slides, speakers' transcript, and a transcript of chat questions and answers.

Webinar: A Trauma-Informed Effective Reinforcement System for Girls Cover

"All crime data have flaws, but sexual assault data are notoriously inaccurate. Why are these data so problematic? And what are the consequences for how we address sexual violence in the United States? Data on rape and sexual assault suffer from inconsistent estimates and underreporting, leading to misunderstandings about the extent of the problem and adequate policy solutions. Let’s look at two major sources of information on the topic: survey-based studies that estimate prevalence of sexual assaults and criminal justice system data. In this post, we look at data on female victims of sexual violence, since most existing reports and statistics focus on women. Data on sexual assault against men are especially sparse; we know even less about the experiences of male victims" (p. 1). Sections cover: two different surveys, two different stories—National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) and the National Intimate Partner Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS); and why criminal justice data can be misleading.

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This brief describes the accomplishments to date and agenda moving forward for this group. “The Cabinet-level Reentry Council is working to enhance community safety and well-being, assist those returning from prison and jail becoming productive citizens, and save taxpayers dollars by lowering the direct and collateral costs of incarceration” (p. 1).

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