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Gender responsive

Issue contents are: “Foreword” by Kermit Humphries; “An Overview of NIC’s Transition from Prison to the Community Initiative” by Peggy B. Burke; “Rising to the Challenge of Applying Evidence-Based Practices Across the Spectrum of a State Parole Board” by Sherry Tate and Catherine C. McVey; “Collaboration and Partnership in the Community: Advancing the Michigan Prisoner ReEntry Initiative” by Le’Ann Duran; “Providing Tools for Risk Reduction Case Management in Parole and Community Corrections” by Keven Pellant and Margie Phelps; “Improving Parole Outcomes with Performance Leadership and Data: Doing What Works” by Danny Hunter, George Braucht, and John Prevost; “Working Together to Improve Reentry: Bridging Budgets and Programs, Public and Private, Prison and the Community” by Ginger Martin; “Ensuring Successful Offender Reentry: Umatilla/Morrow County “Reach-In” Services” by Mark Royal; “Creating Better Transitions at Indiana’s Plainfield Reentry Educational Facility” by Michael Lloyd; “Gender-Responsive Reentry in Rhode Island: A Long and Winding Road” by Bree Derrick; and “Missouri Makes Its Move Toward a New Reentry Philosophy” by Julie Boehm.

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Do you and your agency have questions about the management of transgender persons in custody?

In response to this emerging correctional issue, the National Institute of Corrections conducted a live internet broadcast designed to: provide information to agency legal counsel and corrections professionals regarding transgender persons in custody and their presumptive legal rights; demystify the issues surrounding policy and procedures decisions affecting this population; and identify emerging challenges and opportunities to provide strategies for ensuring equity while maintaining safety and security.

During this internet broadcast, held March 29, 2017, the presenters:

  • Address agencies questions regarding issues, barriers, challenges and practices that affect transgender persons in custody;
  • Illustrate areas of greatest liability for agencies regarding transgender persons in custody; Determine areas to address in agency policy and procedure;
  • Explain steps agencies should take to ensure the safety and security of this population while in custody;
  • and Presenters will also share recommendations and resources.

This broadcast will answer the following questions:

  • What is the current state of litigation regarding transgender persons in custody?
  • What legal rights do transgender persons in custody have?
  • What are the best and promising practices for safe and secure housing of transgender persons?
  • How can my agency provide reasonable accommodations for transgender persons in our custody?

Please note that this broadcast was recorded in 2017 and the field has continued to move forward since the recording. Some states have had new court decisions impacting transgender persons, NIC recommends additional research to make sure you have the latest information.

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The impact of trauma on girls involved in the juvenile justice system is examined. Sections of this fact sheet cover: why there are increasing numbers of girls in the juvenile justice system; prevalence of trauma-exposure among justice-involved girls; prevalence of PTSD (posttraumatic stress disorder) among justice-involved girls; potential consequences of trauma for girls; impact of the juvenile justice system on traumatized girls; and gender-responsive programming. This review suggests that trauma-informed and gender-responsive programming and intervention models are needed in order to address girls’ needs and to prevent retraumatization of girls in the juvenile justice system. Experiences of trauma, maltreatment, and victimization play a role in placing many girls on the pathway toward delinquency. Further, girls who participate in delinquent activities are at risk for retraumatization and the additional long-term consequences associated with polyvictimization (p. 8).

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This “event focused on the importance and implementation of trauma-informed approaches to girls in the system, while providing an opportunity to learn about programs that have proven effective across the country. Mr. Robert Listenbee, Administrator of the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) reaffirmed his office’s commitment to developing more information and tools about girls in the justice system in order to better meet their unique needs. The event featured Dr. Stephanie Covington, Co-Director at the Center for Gender and Justice, and her work on trauma-informed approaches to girls. As a nationally recognized clinician, Dr. Covington articulated the need for more gender-responsive and trauma-informed treatment services for women and girls in the public, private, and institutional settings.” The agenda included: Keynote Address: A Trauma-Informed Approach to Girls: What It Is and Why It’s Needed” by Dr. Covington; Discussion of Keynote—The Importance of a Trauma-Informed Approach to Girls; Panel 1—Implementation of Trauma-Informed Approaches in Public Systems; and Panel 2—Exposure to Violence and Trauma at Home and in the Neighborhood. The second link takes you to the slides for Dr. Covington’s presentation.

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The "use of jail exit surveys as an effective data collection tool for creating [a] picture of the characteristics of women in contact with the local jail" is described (p. 1). Sections of this bulletin are: introduction; how one jurisdiction used data to inform responses to women offenders; reasons for conducting a jail exit survey; what a jail exit survey entails; tips for getting started; designing a jail exit survey; understanding jail exit survey information; comprehensive listing of major data elements to include in a jail exit survey; and lessons learned. A sample questionnaire is also included.

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"The TLC TIER (Trauma Informed Effective Reinforcement) System for Girls is a female responsive, research-based model that offers short-term detention and residential programs an effective alternative to compliance-focused behavior management systems. The TIER System for Girls teaches staff skills that are more effective in motivating positive behavior with girls than traditional points and level systems. This Webinar reviews the framework of the TIER System for Girls, and provides examples of processes and techniques that will establish a gender responsive, trauma-informed program culture. Learning Objectives: explore the elements of a trauma-informed, gender responsive system that promotes safe behavior in residential programs and detention facilities; learn about the importance of developing a gender responsive program culture/environment for girls; and discover how to engage girls and staff when improving elements of program culture/environment through real-life examples. This website provides access to a recording of the webinar, presentation slides, speakers' transcript, and a transcript of chat questions and answers.

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This training program presents strategies for making women offender workplace development programs more responsive to their clients. Topics include:

  • Emerging evidence-based gender responsive practices
  • Information strategies and case management models
  • Career theories and assessment tools
  • Collaborative relationships that support effective reentry
  • How a history of criminal convictions impacts job search efforts
  • Women Offender Case Management Model (WOCMM)
  • Strengths and needs of female offenders
  • Motivational interviewing & relational language
  • Transitional and social learning theories
  • What is in it for the system and staff
  • Pains of imprisonment
  • Assessment classification and gender responsive tools
  • Examples of best practices
  • And more.
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Individuals who want an up-to-date understanding of gender-responsive issues and all those who work with female offenders should read this document report. It “outlines the risks faced by women deprived of their liberty of being subjected to torture and ill-treatment and measures that can be taken to reduce such risks. The main focus of the paper is the situation of women in detention in the criminal justice system, though the discussion is in many cases equally relevant to women deprived of liberty in other contexts, such as psychiatric institutions and immigration detention facilities” (p. 3). Sections contained in this document include: introduction to gender-specific treatment; why monitoring bodies should look at this issue; concepts—gender and gender mainstreaming, and discrimination and violence against women; risk factors and measures to reduce risk—certain contexts which heighten risk, certain times that heighten risk, certain policies and practices that heighten risk or cause physical or mental suffering, and certain categories of women who are at heightened risk(girls, victims of human trafficking and sex workers, women with mental healthcare needs, and other groups; and the qualities monitoring bodies need to be effective in this endeavor.

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Individuals who want an up-to-date understanding of gender-responsive issues and all those who work with female offenders should read this document report. "It outlines the risks faced by women deprived of their liberty of being subjected to torture and ill-treatment and measures that can be taken to reduce such risks. The main focus of the paper is the situation of women in detention in the criminal justice system, though the discussion is in many cases equally relevant to women deprived of liberty in other contexts, such as psychiatric institutions and immigration detention facilities.” (p. 2). Sections contained in this document include: introduction to gender-specific treatment; why monitoring bodies should look at this issue; concepts—gender and gender mainstreaming, and discrimination and violence against women; risk factors and measures to reduce risk—certain contexts which heighten risk, certain times that heighten risk, certain policies and practices that heighten risk or cause physical or mental suffering, and certain categories of women who are at heightened risk (girls, victims of human trafficking and sex workers, women with mental healthcare needs, and other groups); and the qualities monitoring bodies need to engage in this endeavor.

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The gender-responsive Women Offender Case Management Model (WOCMM) is described. This document covers: the history of the project; philosophy and core practices; process incorporating four core elements (e.g., engage and assess, enhance motivation, implement the case plan, and review progress); preparing for implementation; and evaluation.

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