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"This resource was designed to enable correctional entities to comply with HIPAA and 42 CFR Part 2 in the receipt or sharing of PHI [public health information], whether the correctional entity meets HIPAA’s designation of a “covered entity,”17 is determined by 42 CFR Part 2 to be a “federally assisted program,”18 or does not meet either criteria. The tools within the resource may be used by any correctional entity interested in articulating its commitment to protecting PHI and implementing the components of a privacy framework." This publication is made up of three chapters: introduction; overview of HIPAA and 42 CFR Part 2 regulations—HIPAA regulations regarding medical and mental health information, and 42 CFR Part 2 regarding substance abuse information; and PHI policy development template. Appendixes include: glossary; listing of applicable federal laws; release of information—consent authorization guidance; contractual agreements; court orders; 42 CFR 2.22—Notice to Patients of Federal Confidentiality Requirements; PHI Privacy Policy Review Checklist; and standards and resource list.

Corrections and Reentry: Protected Health Information Privacy Framework for Information Sharing Cover

Anyone dealing with the provision of services to justice-involved youth should read this publication. “This report outlines federal and state eligibility, enroll¬ment, and outreach strategies that can help facilitate seamless coverage for system-involved youth. Adoption of these initiatives has the potential to improve the lives of juvenile justice-involved youth and their families, increase their ability to remain in the community, and ultimately, reduce recidivism. Key to the success of these strategies will be ongoing collaboration between the multiple state and federal agencies that interact with the juvenile justice population” (p. 7). Sections of this publication discuss: Medicaid eligibility options to ease community reentry—suspending eligibility, continuous eligibility, presumptive eligibility, and special enrollment procedures (Oregon, Colorado, and Texas); implications of health reform for juvenile justice-involved youth—eligibility and enrollment policies; emerging issues—transitions in coverage between Medicaid, CHIP (Children's Health Insurance Program) and exchanges; and evidence based practices for meeting the needs of juvenile justice-involved youth.

Facilitating Access to Health Care Coverage for Juvenile Justice-Involved Youth Cover

“As states and juvenile justice stakeholders work to facilitate health coverage and access for system-involved youth, they can draw upon the experiences of their counterparts across the country to improve eligibility, enrollment, and outreach processes. Medicaid eligibility strategies in several states have already facilitated seamless coverage for juvenile justice-involved youth, and consumer assistance programs created by the Affordable Care Act (ACA) will provide additional resources to support continuity of care. Collaboration among Medicaid and juvenile justice systems and stakeholders will be essential to fully realizing the opportunities presented by health care reform.” Sections of this brief cover: the issue of Medicaid coverage for justice-involved youth; innovations—Medicaid eligibility options (suspending eligibility, continuous eligibility, and presumptive eligibility), expedited Medicaid enrollment, and outreach; lessons learned; and looking forward.

Facilitating Health Care Coverage for Juvenile Justice-Involved Youth Cover

Materials on this website address the issue of health care service provision in many county jails. Access is provided to: “ Health Intake, Assessment, and Routine Care Processes in County Jails: A Brief Overview for a NACo Webinar Presented on February 24, 2012”; and a series of flow charts for the Intake Process, Sick Call, and Discharge Planning.

Flow Charts of Jail Procedures: Health Intake, Assessment, and Routine Care Procedures in County Jails Cover

Issues regarding health conditions and health education of incarcerated minority women are discussed in this paper. Topics covered include: incarcerated women's health care—infectious and chronic diseases, disease-specific care, mental health, and programs specifically for incarcerated females; health education programs in prison—education strategies from intake to reentry, and collaborative prison-community partnerships; return to the community-- post release access to care; and a conclusion explaining the need for "[I]mplementation of easy health care access, health education programs and treatment interventions during and post incarceration allow incarcerated women an opportunity to maintain medical treatment practices and have positive health outcomes" (p. 6).

Forgotten Women: Incarceration and Health Concerns of Minority Women cover

The answers to the eleven most asked questions about providing health care in a correctional setting as directed by the Affordable Care Act (ACA) are given. This is important information for correctional agencies trying to address the costs they incur in the provision of inmate health services.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ): The Affordable Care Act (ACA) and Justice-Involved Populations Cover

“This course provides an overview of how upcoming changes to California’s health care system will impact local criminal justice systems. Speakers compare and contrast health care in the county corrections systems today with health care in the years to come under the Affordable Care Act. A framework for providing health care to the criminal justice population is presented to facilitate preparations at the county level that can help to maximize criminal justice resources. Highlights include: How improving access to health care can reduce recidivism; Health care for the criminal justice population today and tomorrow--How it will work in 2014 and beyond; [and] Laying out a framework: An overview of the steps criminal justice systems can take to take advantage of health care reform opportunities.” The home website provides access to: course materials including slides from the following presentations: “Public Health and Public Safety: Explaining the Critical Intersection of Healthcare and Recidivism” by Community Oriented Correctional Health Services (COCHS); “Covered California: Understanding Health Benefits” by David Panush; “Counties and Medi-Cal for Inmates: Current Rules – Future Considerations” by Cathy Senderling-McDonald; “Health Care Reform and Medi-Cal: Looking to 2014” by Leonard J. Finocchio; “Covered California: Understanding Health Benefits” by California Health Benefit Exchange; “Public Health and Public Safety: Explaining the Critical Intersection of Healthcare and Recidivism” by Community Oriented Correctional Health Services (COCHS); and “Counties and Medi-Cal for Inmates: Current Rules – Future Considerations” by Cathy Senderling-McDonald; links to course related materials about public health and public safety, healthcare for today and tomorrow, and framework development; and links to other resources.

Healthcare Reform and County Criminal Justice Systems: An Introduction to Health Care Reform and the Opportunities and Challenges for County Criminal Justice Cover

"This brief provides an overview of the health and mental health needs of girls and boys in the juvenile justice system and the role of Medicaid in addressing those needs. It focuses on the circumstances of those girls and boys who are placed in juvenile justice residential facilities, the discontinuity of Medicaid coverage for those youth, and the options for improving coverage, continuity of care and access to needed services post-discharge, including new opportunities provided by the Affordable Care Act" (p. 1). Sections of this publication cover: profile of youth in the juvenile justice system; types of juvenile justice residential placements; health needs of girls and boys in the juvenile justice system; health services for youth in juvenile justice residential placements; the roles of Medicaid and the Children's health Insurance Program (CHIP); and key issues looking forward. Also includes are these appendixes: "Girls and Boys in the Juvenile Justice by State, 2010" (table); "Girls Health Screen (GHS)"—description; and "Origins of Medicaid's Inmate Exclusion".

Health Coverage and Care for Youth in the Juvenile Justice System: The Role of Medicaid and CHIP Cover

"Medicaid allows for—and the federal government encourages—continued eligibility for coverage for a person who is incarcerated. Although the ACA [Affordable Care Act] did not address suspension versus termination, for states that are expanding Medicaid the number of inmates eligible for coverage will increase dramatically and the benefits to counties of suspending instead of terminating their coverage will be substantial" (p. 1). This brief addresses issues associated with suspending Medicaid coverage for prisoners. Sections cover: why ensuring access to Medicaid post-release is important to counties; access to treatment positively impacts public safety; what the difference is between suspension and termination of Medicaid coverage; states that suspend rather than terminate; what counties can do with highlights from Maricopa County (AZ), Salt Lake City (UT), California, and Oregon.

Health Coverage and County Jails: Suspension vs. Termination Cover

This webinar explains: what health literacy has to do with accessing health care; what literacy is; what health literacy is; the five steps of health literacy—find health information, understand it, evaluate it, communicate it, and use it; the health literacy of U.S. adults; health literacy is disproportionate; barriers to good health literacy; what needs to be done; prevalence of disease; health risks following release; transitional care—continuity of care; barriers to care; Transitions Clinic Program—patient centered and culturally competent care for returning prisoners; strategies to successful engagement post-release; the need for referrals to the community by criminal justice providers; how to make connections between criminal justice providers and the community; referrals to the community from the jail or prison; referrals to the community; and electronic linkages.

Health Literacy Cover

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