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"By working together to build a visual portrait of how individuals progress through the criminal justice system, health and justice stakeholders gain better understanding of their respective policies and practices. In addition, mapping allows jurisdictions to consider decision points throughout the entire criminal justice system when exploring opportunities to enroll criminal justice-involved individuals in insurance coverage. This guide is for states and local jurisdictions interested in using system mapping to maximize opportunities for criminal justice and health care system integration and efficiency through the ACA " (p. 3). Sections comprising this document include: the Affordable Care Act (ACA) at a glance; the need for a systems mapping process; the NIC Sample Decision Points Map; and the seven steps of the criminal justice/ACA mapping process. "General health and behavioral health issues with criminal justice-involved individuals intersect. Hence, it is critical that the needs of the population are considered as jurisdictions develop policies and processes to implement the ACA at state and local levels. Bringing together stakeholders from criminal justice, health care, and behavioral health care systems for dialogue around these issues builds increased understanding and collaboration across systems. Using the ACA to do a better job of delivering health care and behavioral health care services to this population not only improves the health of our communities, but makes them safer" (p. 11). Appendixes provide: Sample Intercept Map for ACA Eligibility/Enrollment Priorities; Completed Intercept Map for ACA Eligibility/Enrollment Priorities in Connecticut; and Action Plan Template.

For addtional information on this topic contact NIC Correctional Program Specialist Katie Green.


 

Mapping the Criminal Justice System Cover

Mass incarceration disproportionately impacts lower-income communities, communities of color, and persons with disabilities, creating a barrier to achieving health equity. People who are incarcerated face greater chances for chronic health conditions, both while confined and long after their release. Incarceration exposes people to a wide range of conditions, such as poor sanitation and ventilation and solitary confinement, that are detrimental to long-term physical and mental health.

"This webinar explains and clarifies the issues related to allowable uses of federal Medicaid funds for incarcerated individuals, and provides an example of how corrections departments can leverage cost savings as a result. The discussion focuses on the challenges related to implementation and establishment of cross-agency collaboration, and the subsequent successes and cost savings that can be achieved." The agenda of this webinar is: "Introduction" by Fred Osher; "Financing Health Care for Individuals Involved in the Criminal Justice System" by Gabrielle de la Gueronniere; "An Introduction to Medicaid Eligibility and the Application Process" by Terri L. Catlett, Larry Huggins, and William Appel; and "Moderated Q&A Session" moderated by Osher.

Maximizing Medicaid: An Innovative Approach to Finance Health Care for Criminal Justice Populations [Webinar] Cover

"Meaningful use is the linchpin of the Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentive Programs, established under the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act to provide incentive payments to eligible providers that adopt and demonstrate “meaningful use” of certified EHR [electronic health record] technology. Providers demonstrate meaningful use by “attesting” to certain criteria for different stages of meaningful use … This article provides an overview of the meaningful use landscape, emphasizing the applicability of meaningful use to health care provided in jails, as well as exploring the benefits and difficulties of participating in this program for jail health care providers. It also describes the steps that jail health care systems must pursue in order to participate in meaningful use" (p. 1). Sections of this paper cover: issue introduction; what meaningful use is; benefits of meaningful use for correctional health services; obstacles to jail participation in meaningful use; correctional institutions participating in meaningful use; steps toward eligibility; impact of meaningful use on correctional health systems; and concluding observations.

Meaningful Use and Corrections: Unknown Opportunities Cover

This webinar will: define roles that criminal justice professionals play in Medicaid Administrative Claiming (MAC) and Targeted Case Management (TCM); define service needs of justice involved individuals; highlight community corrections and criminal justice agency examples of resource utilization; explain strategies for meeting increased demand for healthcare services under the Affordable Care Act; and differentiate between MAC and TCM. The webinar aims to: demonstrate that MAC and TCM are excellent fits with day to day activities that Probation Officers and Parole Agents provide; and walk through the process to assist interested individuals in getting MAC/TCM up and running in their locales.

Medicaid Administrative Claiming and Targeted Case Management Cover

“This brief outlines opportunities for states and local jurisdictions to improve public health and safety outcomes, and reduce spending on corrections and health care services by maximizing the appropriate use of Medicaid coverage for people involved with the criminal justice system.” Sections discuss: federal Medicaid rules on coverage of criminal justice populations; what Medicaid entails; allowable uses of Medicaid for incarcerated persons; understanding Medicaid enrollment, suspension, and termination; the ACA’s (Affordable Care Act’s) Medicaid expansion—opportunities to increase health coverage for individuals involved with the criminal justice system; opportunities to maximize Medicaid enrollment; state approaches to utilizing Medicaid for justice-involved individuals—North Carolina, New York, and Colorado; special benefits considerations for the Medicaid expansion population; and four opportunities and recommendations for state policymakers. On-site use only

Medicaid and Financing Health Care for Individuals Involved with the Criminal Justice System Cover

"Financing health care for inmates can be a significant portion of state correctional spending for some states with health care costs ranging from an estimated 6 percent to 33 percent of institutional corrections spending in 2008, the most recent estimate available. The combination of expanded Medicaid eligibility and enhanced funding for those newly eligible as allowed under PPACA [Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act] gives states additional incentives to enroll inmates in Medicaid and obtain federal matching funds, and increases the federal responsibility for financing allowable services for inmates. Questions exist about the potential costs to the federal government, because little is known about how many inmates are eligible for Medicaid or the extent to which states are obtaining federal matching funds for allowable services … In this report, we provide information on the proportion of inmates eligible for Medicaid, and state efforts to enroll inmates in Medicaid and obtain federal matching funds for allowable services" (p. 2). While a large percentage of inmates will be eligible for Medicaid in the 27 states that have expanded Medicaid eligibility, only a very small percentage will be eligible for federal Medicaid funds. The impact to federal spending will be extremely limited.

Medicaid: Information on Inmate Eligibility and Federal Costs for Allowable Services Cover

This report "[p]resents the prevalence of medical problems among state and federal prisoners and jail inmates, highlighting differences in rates of chronic conditions and infectious diseases by demographic characteristic. The report describes health care services and treatment received by prisoners and jail inmates with health problems, including doctor's visits, use of prescription medication, and other types of treatment. It also explains reasons why inmates with health problems were not receiving care and describes inmate satisfaction with health services received while incarcerated. Highlights: In 2011–12, an estimated 40% of state and federal prisoners and jail inmates reported having a current chronic medical condition while about half reported ever having a chronic medical condition; Twenty-one percent of prisoners and 14% of jail inmates reported ever having tuberculosis, hepatitis B or C, or other STDs (excluding HIV or AIDS); Both prisoners and jail inmates were more likely than the general population to report ever having a chronic condition or infectious disease. The same finding held true for each specific condition or infectious disease; Among prisoners and jail inmates, females were more likely than males to report ever having a chronic condition; High blood pressure was the most common chronic condition reported by prisoners (30%) and jail inmates (26%); About 66% of prisoners and 40% of jail inmates with a chronic condition at the time of interview reported taking prescription medication; [and] More than half of prisoners (56%) and jail inmates (51%) said that they were either very satisfied or somewhat satisfied with the health care services received since admission" (BJS).

Medical Problems Of State And Federal Prisoners And Jail Inmates, 2011-12 Cover

This is an excellent introduction to compassion fatigue (CF) (aka corrections fatigue) experienced by correctional health care staff. "While there is some literature on CF and burnout among correctional officers, there is scant information on how these phenomena affect correctional health care staff. This article discusses ways that CF may adversely impact the well-being of qualified mental health professionals who work in jail and prison settings. When left untreated, CF may result in serious and detrimental personal costs to the individual and organization. These costs can be mitigated by positive self-care, which also will be addressed in this article" (p. 10). Sections of this article cover: what compassion fatigue is; the role of trauma; why we neglect ourselves; the importance of prevention; compassion satisfaction—the flip side of CF; calendar it—planning ahead for self-care; organizational considerations; and taking care of yourself.

Minimize Compassion Fatigue, Avoid Burnout and Reignite Your Passion Cover

The mission of the National Commission on Correctional Health Care is to improve the quality of health care in jails, prisons and juvenile confinement facilities. NCCHC establishes standards for health services in correctional facilities, operates a voluntary accreditation program for institutions that meet those standards, produces resource publications, conducts educational conferences and offers certification for correctional health professionals. NCCHC is supported by the major national organizations representing the fields of health, mental health, law and corrections. Each supporting organization has named a liaison to the NCCHC board of directors to create a robust, multidisciplinary governing structure that reflects the complexities of correctional health care.

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