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Information technology

"On September 17, 2014, the federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) convened a two-day conference in Rockville, Maryland called Bridging the Gap: Improving the Health of Justice-Involved People through Information Technology. The meeting aimed to address the problems of disconnected justice and health systems and to develop solutions by describing barriers, benefits, and best practices for connecting community providers and correctional facilities using health information technology (HIT) … The following proceedings give an overview of each session and a synthesis of the obstacles to instituting HIT solutions for information sharing detailed during the meeting. The proceedings address the importance of using emerging HIT to respond to the growing problem of people with mental health and substance use disorders involved in the criminal justice system and to articulate a vision of how HIT can facilitate ongoing connections between health and justice systems" (p. 2). Sections cover: the vision—no wrong door; from correctional facilities to community providers; from community providers to correctional facilities; challenges of using health information technology to improve the health of justice-involved people; overcoming challenges—opportunities and solutions; resources for finding solutions; case study—creating a health ecosystem in Louisville, Kentucky.

Bridging the Gap Cover

"Institutional and community corrections agencies face increasingly complex tasks and challenges today. It is important, therefore, to identify opportunities where changes in tools, technology, practices, or approaches can help agencies respond more effectively to solve problems and mitigate risks in their role to protect the public. Given resource constraints, setting priorities among many possible innovations is necessary … This interactive tool allows users to leverage the research in the report and also to see how the identified priorities would change, based on their own policies and/or organizational priorities. The interactive tool for ranking corrections innovations can be used by corrections professionals, policy makers, or interested members of the public to identify the highest priority correction needs informed by their own views of the goals and missions of corrections agencies … This tool allows users to view how the results would change if the relative importance of the corrections goals was different. Users can increase or decrease the weight given to the different goals using the Adjust Ranking Priorities slider bars (left is lower relative importance, right is higher) and the innovation needs will move up and down, with the highest ranked needs appearing at the top."

Corrections Innovations Needs Tool Cover

"Criminal justice professionals face immense challenges today to make communities safer and to equitably apply the law. Their mission is further complicated by the acceleration of technological change that fuels an urgent demand to improve the safety and effectiveness of and access to new law enforcement technology. Budgets to fund these objectives are typically small in comparison to the resources available, making it necessary to engage in strategic planning that will allow units and departments to make the best investments possible … RAND has developed a technology and practice taxonomy to assist in identifying and categorizing potential corrections innovations … Upon viewing the Corrections Technology and Practice Taxonomy, users will see tabs at the upper left-hand corner that will allow them to access information about community or institutional corrections. Once the type of corrections information is selected, a list of parent terms that are representative of major corrections technologies and practice areas will be visible. By clicking on a parent term, descending layers of more specific child terms appear."

Corrections Technology and Practice Taxonomy Cover

"Technology has transformed the way we approach most daily tasks and activities. It plays a role in how we apply for and perform on a job, communicate with friends and family, access government and other services, manage our finances, and purchase entertainment. Technology also enables our learning … The policies and practices of federal, state, and local corrections agencies, including the juvenile justice system, severely hinder the ability of correctional education programs to enable learning through technology … The primary concern about adopting educational technology in corrections is the potential for security breaches. Other reasons include, but are not limited to, insufficient resources and staff capacity to purchase, implement, maintain, and monitor advanced technologies … This report is designed to inform federal, state, and local corrections and correctional education administrators as they explore ways to securely and cost effectively provide advanced technologies in corrections facilities to help strengthen and expand educational and reentry services. It describes the current status of these technologies in corrections, existing and emerging approaches to providing such services in facilities, and the successes and challenges of early implementers. The report concludes with a set of recommendations that align with the National Education Technology Plan’s five overarching goals" (p. 1-3). Sections of this report include: introduction; overview; current status of advanced technologies in corrections; mobile device vendors providing educational technology in corrections; successes and challenges of early implementers; international use of technology in correctional education delivery; recommendations for adopting educational technology in corrections; information technology terminology; and the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction's Policy on Internet Access to Prisoners.

Educational Technology in Corrections, 2015 cover

The effects of information technology (IT) and computation developments on prison classification productivity are examined (p. vi). Ten chapters follow an executive summary: current status of MIS (management information system) support for prison classification brief review; MIS software, IT and classification productivity; offender classification roles and data requirements; automated prison classification system features and functions; software design principles and the user interface; evaluating classification MIS; integrating criminal justice system MISs; new directions in classification factors and information content; advances in analytical capacities of IT to strengthen prison classification; and implementing new technology and managing change. Appendixes contain general inmate processing procedures for Department of Correction(s) (or Correctional Services) in Washington, Florida, New Jersey, North Carolina, South Carolina, New York, and Colorado.

Enhancing Prison Classification Systems: The Emerging Role of Management Information Systems Cover

"The agencies of the U.S. corrections enterprise manage offenders confined in prisons and jails and those who have been released into the community on probation and parole. The enterprise is one of the three central pillars of the criminal justice system, along with police and the courts. Corrections agencies face major challenges from declining budgets, increasing populations under supervision, problems of equity and fairness in administrating justice, and other concerns. To better achieve its objectives and play its role within the criminal justice enterprise, the sector needs innovation in corrections technology, policy, and practice. This report draws on published literature and new structured deliberations of a practitioner Corrections Advisory Panel to frame an innovation agenda. It identifies and prioritizes potential improvements in technology, policy, and practice in both community and institutional corrections" (RAND). Six chapters are contained in this publication: introduction—the need for innovation in corrections, and building an innovation agenda for corrections; the state of corrections today; corrections technology and practice today; from corrections today to corrections tomorrow—identifying needs in community and institutional corrections; prioritizing needs to develop an innovation agenda for corrections; conclusions—fostering innovation in corrections. Appendixes provide full lists for community and institutional corrections needs. "Some of the top-tier needs identified by the panel and researchers include adapting transcription and translation tools for the corrections environment, developing training for officers on best practices for managing offenders with mental health needs, and changing visitation policies (for example, using video visitation) to reduce opportunities for visitors to bring contraband into jails and prisons. Such high-priority needs provide a menu of innovation options for addressing key problems or capitalizing on emerging opportunities in the corrections sector" (RAND).

Fostering Innovation in Community and Institutional Corrections: Identifying High-Priority Technology and Other Needs for the U.S. Corrections Sector Cover

“The goal of the [Center for Social Media] initiative is to build the capacity of law enforcement to use social media to prevent and solve crimes, strengthen police-community relations, and enhance services. IACP’s Center for Social Media serves as a clearinghouse of information and no-cost resources to help law enforcement personnel develop or enhance their agency’s use of social media and integrate Web 2.0 tools into agency operations.” Points of access include: getting started—an introduction to social media, strategy development, policy development, and putting it all into action; technologies; topics-- alerts and notifications, analytics and metrics, community outreach and citizen engagement, crime information, crime prevention, emergency preparedness and response, investigations, legal and legislative, malicious use, mobile, policy, privacy, safety, and security, public relations and reputation management, recruiting, research, strategy, and vetting; resources—case law, case studies, FAQ, fun facts, glossary terms, publications, tools and tutorials, and training and technical assistance; directory of law enforcement agencies that use social media; news; information regarding the initiative; blog; Executive Chiefs’ Corner; IACP’s Social Media Survey results; new on the site; items of interest; and frequently asked questions.

IACP Center Cover

This paper “shares insights from the experiences of five jurisdictions working to implement different forms of HIT connectivity. Although there is no turnkey solution, there are lessons to be learned. [The] intent here is to share these lessons with those interested in improving health care in jail environments and with jurisdictions that are looking for ways to create connectivity in their communities” (p. 5). Sections of this report cover: bridging the islands between jail management systems, jail health systems, and community health systems; three guiding principles for connectivity—policy, resources, and champions; and HIT (health information technology) connectivity in Orlando County (FL), Multnomah County (OR), New York City, Hampden County (MA), and Fayette County (KY).

Jails and Health Cover

"This Tech Guide is designed to introduce the role of performance measurement . . . and to teach core dynamics of performance management, monitoring, and reporting" (p. 4). Nine chapters are contained in this guide: what performance measurement is and why it is important; establish an integrated performance measurement framework; define mission and strategic performance objectives; establish a performance management framework; establish accountability for performance; develop a data collection plan; analyze, review, and report performance data; use performance information to drive improvement; and build performance management into everyday policing. Sample assessment measures and examples of performance management in justice agencies are also included. This publication is a companion guide to "Law Enforcement Tech Guide: How to Plan, Purchase and Manage Technology (Successfully) (NIC accession no. 018694).

Law Enforcement Tech Guide for Creating Performance Measures That Work:  A Guide for Executives and Managers Cover

"[S]trategies, best practices, recommendations and ideas for successful IT planning and implementation" (p. 3) are provided. This guide is divided into the following parts: seven facts to know before reading this document; build the foundation; conduct a needs analysis; create a project plan; acquire the technology; implement the technology; and maintain the technology. Descriptions of information technology and a glossary are also included.

Law Enforcement Tech Guide: How to Plan, Purchase and Manage Technology (Successfully!) Cover

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