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"Meaningful use is the linchpin of the Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentive Programs, established under the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act to provide incentive payments to eligible providers that adopt and demonstrate “meaningful use” of certified EHR [electronic health record] technology. Providers demonstrate meaningful use by “attesting” to certain criteria for different stages of meaningful use … This article provides an overview of the meaningful use landscape, emphasizing the applicability of meaningful use to health care provided in jails, as well as exploring the benefits and difficulties of participating in this program for jail health care providers. It also describes the steps that jail health care systems must pursue in order to participate in meaningful use" (p. 1). Sections of this paper cover: issue introduction; what meaningful use is; benefits of meaningful use for correctional health services; obstacles to jail participation in meaningful use; correctional institutions participating in meaningful use; steps toward eligibility; impact of meaningful use on correctional health systems; and concluding observations.

Meaningful Use and Corrections: Unknown Opportunities Cover

These proceedings are comprised of: Highlights of the Meeting Sessions; Stay Awake or You Will Trip Over the Future by Tom Esensten; Video Presentation: Beyond the Myths: Jails in Your Community introduced by Virginia Hutchinson; Defining the Future and Exploring Organizational Strategies by Esensten: Future Trends and Their Impact on Jail Management by Marilyn Chandler Ford; Jail Population Growth: Sources of Growth and Stability by Allen Beck; Jail Standards and Accreditation: Are There Still Advantages? by Tim Ryan et al; Accreditation: Open Forum Discussion; Use of New Technology by Barry Stanton and Otto Payne; Wrap-Up Issues; Use of Existing Technology for New Purposes by Joe Russo; Use of Technology: Open Forum Discussion; and Announcements and Discussion of Next Meeting by Richard Geaither and meeting participants.

Proceedings of Cover

In many ways technology has been a help and a hindrance for the corrections field. People working in the field struggle to decide how to handle these technologies...if at all. Technology consistently changes faster than corrections and/or society can keep up with it. Implementing a technology, or plans to battle it (take cell phones for instance), can be a long and difficult process, and before new technology can be implemented, things may have changed. This package page contains information about: computers & the internet, apps, body cameras, bio-metrics & facial recognition, cell phones, drones, electronic monitoring & GPS, and x-rays & scanners, in order to provide information on the biggest trends in technology for the corrections field.

"This report describes the results of the Law Enforcement Futuring Workshop, which was held at RAND's Washington Office in Arlington, Virginia, from July 22 to 25, 2014. The objective of this workshop was to identify high-priority technology needs for law enforcement based on consideration of current and future trends in society, technology, and law enforcement over a ten- to 20-year time period." Five chapters comprise this report: introduction; methodology; future law enforcement scenarios—current position, current roles of technology, emerging uses of technology, and future scenarios; technology needs—ranking, topic areas of ranked technology needs, and technology categorization of ranked technology needs; and conclusions—information sharing as a driver toward desirable futures, education and development as a driver, technology research and development as a driver, and conclusions from the workshop. "The output of this workshop described in the report included ten future scenarios and 30 technology needs. The technology needs fell into three general categories — technology-related knowledge and practice, information sharing and use, and technological research and development — and were placed into three priority tiers."

Visions of Law Enforcement Technology in the Period 2024-2034: Report of the Law Enforcement Futuring Workshop cover

Beginning in the late 1990’s, the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) Information Center began scanning social, economic, and corrections issues to inform the development of training programs and services offered by NIC. This report, now in its twelfth edition, and renamed from the Environmental Scan to the Corrections Environmental Scan, has continued to evolve into a popular tool that corrections practitioners use to inform their work in jails, prisons, and community corrections. Because there are many issues beyond what is addressed in this environmental scan that will potentially influence corrections, this report is intended to give a broad overview of selected current and anticipated trends and not to be comprehensive in scope. The methods for selecting articles, reports, and other materials was based on a scan of news sources, websites, and corrections-specific publications. As part of the ongoing work of the NIC Information Center in supporting the work of corrections professionals, staff regularly monitors reports and publications from state, national, global, and independent sources. The report is arranged with the topics: population, demographics, economy, workforce, technology, substance abuse and mental health, healthcare, and crime and recidivism statistics. Each section gives a summary of trends and developments in corrections, and includes national and global perspectives. A new feature debuts the new NIC website and highlights the State Statistics Information page. This web page provides lists of resources related to local, state, and federal statistics displayed to help you see the current state of the corrections industry as of the last set of reported data.

Beginning in the late 1990’s, the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) Information Center began scanning social, economic, and corrections issues to inform the development of programs and services offered by NIC. This report, now in its 11th edition, has continued to evolve into a popular tool that corrections practitioners also use to inform their work in jails, prisons, and community corrections. Because there are many issues beyond what is addressed in this environmental scan that will potentially influence corrections, this report is intended to give a broad overview of selected current and anticipated trends and not intended to be comprehensive. 

The method for selecting articles, reports, and other materials was based on a scan of popular magazines, newspapers, and websites as well as corrections-specific publications. As part of the ongoing work of the Information Center in supporting the work of corrections practitioners, staff regularly monitors reports and publications from state, national, and independent sources. The report is arranged starting with global and broader influences on corrections and moves to specific corrections issues. Each section of the report gives an overview of the topic followed by corrections-specific trends and developments in this area” (p. 3). 

Sections of this report are: introduction; international developments; demographic and social trends; the workforce; technology; public opinion; the economy and government spending; criminal justice trends; corrections populations and trends; and mental health care in corrections.

Environmental Scan 2016 cover

“Beginning in the late 1990’s, the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) Information Center began scanning social, economic, and corrections issues to inform the development of programs and services offered by NIC. This report, now in its 10th edition, has continued to evolve into a popular tool that corrections practitioners also use to inform their work in jails, prisons, and community corrections. Because there are many issues beyond what is addressed in this environmental scan that will potentially influence corrections, this report is intended to give a broad overview of selected current and anticipated trends and not intended to be comprehensive. The method for selecting articles, reports, and other materials was based on a scan of popular magazines, newspapers, and websites as well as corrections-specific publications. As part of the ongoing work of the Information Center in supporting the work of corrections practitioners, staff regularly monitors reports and publications from state, national, and independent sources. The report is arranged starting with global and broader influences on corrections and moves to specific corrections issues. Each section of the report gives an overview of the topic followed by corrections-specific trends and developments in this area” (p. 3). Sections of this report are: introduction; international developments; demographic and social trends; the workforce; technology; public opinion; the economy and government spending; criminal justice trends; corrections populations and trends; and mass incarceration.

Environmental Scan 2015

“Beginning in the late 1990’s, the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) Information Center began scanning social, economic and corrections issues to inform the development of programs and services offered by NIC. This report, now in its 9th edition, has continued to evolve into a popular tool that corrections practitioners also use to inform their work in jails, prisons and community corrections. Because there are many issues beyond what is addressed in this environmental scan that potentially will influence corrections, this report is intended to give a broad overview of selected current and anticipated trends and not intended to be comprehensive” (p. 3). Sections of this report are: introduction; international developments; demographic and social trends; the workforce; technology; public opinion; the economy and government spending; criminal justice trends; corrections populations and trends; and cost of incarceration and changing corrections policy.

Environmental Scan 2014 Cover

“Beginning in the late 1990’s, the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) Information Center began scanning social, economic and corrections issues to inform the development of programs and services offered by NIC. This report, now in its 8th edition, has continued to evolve into a popular tool corrections practitioners also use to inform their work in jails, prisons and community corrections. Since there are many issues beyond what is addressed in this environmental scan that potentially will influence corrections, this report is intended to give a broad overview of selected current and anticipated trends and not intended to be comprehensive” (p. 3). Sections of this report are: introduction; international developments; demographic and social trends; the workforce; technology; public opinion; the economy and government spending; criminal justice trends; corrections populations and trends; and the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

Environmental Scan 2013 cover

“Beginning in the late 1990’s, the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) Information Center began scanning social, economic and corrections issues to inform the development of programs and services offered by NIC. This report, now in its 6th edition, has continued to evolve into a popular tool that is also used by corrections practitioners to inform their work in jails, prisons and community corrections. Since there are many issues beyond what is addressed in this environmental scan that potentially will influence corrections, this report is intended to give a broad overview of selected current and anticipated trends and not intended to be comprehensive” (p. 3). Sections of this report are: introduction; international developments; demographic and social trends; the workforce; technology; public opinion; the economy and government spending; criminal justice trends; corrections populations and trends; and corrections program initiative and reentry.

Environmental Scan 2011 cover

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