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Inspection of jails

“The purpose of this guide is to give information that will help states and state jail-related organizations to develop or update jail standards and inspection programs" (p. v). This publication contains the following sections: introduction; role and purpose of jail standards; jail standards and liability; key elements of jail standards and inspection programs; strategies for developing and implementing jail standards programs; technical assistance and resources available from the National Institute of Corrections; topics of litigation; summary of state standards and inspection programs; profiles of three organizational models of standards programs; example of a group charter for a jail standards planning committee; excerpted sections of enabling legislation for Nebraska Jail Standards; and Competency Profile of a Detention Facility Inspector.

Jail Standards and Inspection Programs:  Resource and Implementation Guide Cover

The NIC Jails Division's services include training, networks, technical assistance, and information resources, such as documents and DVDs. These services are conducted under five initiatives.

Jail Administration

We provide training on key elements in jail administration, jail resource management, and building a productive relationship between jail officials and their funding authority. We also sponsor a peer-training network for large jail administrators, including meetings and an online discussion forum. Technical assistance and information resources cover a wide range of jail administration and operational issues.

Inmate Behavior Management

We provide training, technical assistance, and information resources on the design and operation of direct supervision jails and on key elements in managing inmate behavior in all types of jails. These key elements include assessing inmates’ risks and needs (classification), assigning inmates to housing, meeting inmates’ basic needs, setting and conveying behavioral expectations, supervising inmates, and keeping inmates productively occupied.

New Jail Planning

We provide training, technical assistance, and information resources on all phases of new-jail planning.

Jail Standards and Inspection

We provide training for jail inspectors, a peer-training network for chief jail inspectors, information resources on standards and inspection, and related technical assistance.

Crisis Intervention Teams

We provide training to help local jurisdictions learn the core elements of CITs and assess agency readiness to start a CIT.

Division Chief: Stephen Amos

Initial results from the Training Academy Evaluation Project (TAEP) assessing the training offered by the National Institute of Corrections' Academy are presented. Sections of this bulletin are: highlights; research strategy; findings regarding participant demographic and background profile, participants' overall evaluation of training, participants' evaluations of training applicability, and pre/post comparison of perceived applicability; and future directions. Overall, participants rate the training they receive as being of high quality and relevance.

Results from the Training Academy Evaluation Project (TAEP) assessing the training offered by the National Institute of Corrections' Academy are presented. This bulletin discusses how participants felt about individual trainers. Some highlights include: twenty-eight of the 34 trainers received high marks for satisfaction while also receiving an average score of 98% for them to lead classes again. The trainer strength most noted was knowledge of the field (27%), with the trainer weakness most often being insufficient time or hurried pace (10%).

<p>Results from the Training Evaluation Project assessing the training offered by the National Institute of Corrections are presented. This bulletin covers “training results (progress on training objectives), activity level changes (pre- and post-training behavior), and implementation results (in the workplace)” (p.1). Participants made moderate to substantial progress in meeting training objectives, engaged in 70.4% of key training-related behaviors, and made moderate progress implementing training objectives.</p>

<p>Results from the Training Evaluation Project assessing the training offered by the National Institute of Corrections are presented. Evaluations are made of more recent trainings instead of those conducted during the pilot phase of this project. The programs are Inmate Behavior Management, Administering a Small Jail, Conducting Prison Security Audits, and How to Run a Direct Supervision Housing Unit—Training for Trainers. On a 5 point scale, participants rated satisfaction with training and trainers a 4.52 and 4.77 respectively, the learning of training-related knowledge and skills a 4.55, and progress on action plans a 3.19.</p>

<p>Results from the Training Evaluation Project assessing the training offered by the National Institute of Corrections are presented. This bulletin’s primary purpose is to update CwRC-NIC Bulletin 4 (NICIC no. 024801) results about four recent training programs not included in the pilot project findings. The programs are Inmate Behavior Management, Administering a Small Jail, Conducting Prison Security Audits, and How to Run a Direct Supervision Housing Unit—Training for Trainers. Participants reported high to very high rates of training-related learning at the end of the course; 50% over-estimated the potential application of training in their jobs; and 75% lacked estimated progress on action plans.</p>

<p>Results from the Training Evaluation Project assessing the training offered by the National Institute of Corrections are presented. “The primary purpose of this bulletin is to examine leadership from a 360 degree perspective, and to assess relationships between training, leadership, and organizational change” (p. 3). It appears Correctional Leadership Development increased transformational leadership practices while Management Development for the Future had a small effect on leadership change.</p>

Responses to thirteen questions regarding curriculum related to staff sexual misconduct with youth and youth on youth sexual assault are provided. "The objectives of the focus groups included: (1) to gather data that will inform NIC [National Institute of Corrections] in how to best develop a juvenile oriented curriculum on staff sexual misconduct; (2) to gather data that will guide NIC in identifying the major staff sexual misconduct related issues in juvenile corrections, including what stakeholders should be consulted, and what strategies should be utilized in naming the issues and building knowledge about the PREA [Prison Rape Elimination Act]; and (3) to gather information related to various aspects of youth on youth sexual assault" (p.2).

Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) Summary of Responses from Juvenile Focus Group on Staff Sexual Misconduct and Youth on Youth Sexual Assault Cover

Participants represent state agencies that have responsibility for inspection and auditing of local correctional facilities. Some agencies have oversight for juvenile as well as adult corrections or for any agency with sworn officers. Meeting topics: "Session I: Hospital Security Detail" by Mark W. Radcliff; "Session II: Conducting Effective Audits/Inspections" by Larry Reid; "Session III: Objective Jail Classification" by Shannon Herklotz and Jackie Semmler; "Session IV: Legal Issues"" by Carrie Hill; and "Session V: Network Activities."

Proceedings of the NIC Chief Jail Inspectors Network Meeting, September 2015 Cover

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