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Intake processing

The prevalence of drug use in the male arrestee population is determined by the Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring Program II (ADAM II). The major drugs monitored are marijuana, crack and powder cocaine, heroin and other opiates, and methamphetamine. Four sections follow an executive summary: ADAM II overview; the ADAM II sample; drug use and drug market activity among arrestees; and summary and conclusions. The most commonly detected drug was marijuana followed by cocaine metabolites.

ADAM II 2013 Annual Report Cover

The author looks at how the intake process can be made fair for low-income children. His approach “would represent a middle ground between what often happens during the intake evaluation in juvenile court—namely that cases lacking a factual basis are approved for filing—and the practice in adult criminal court, where the defendant’s needs are never a factor in the analysis of whether a criminal complaint should issue” (p. 24). Sections following an abstract are: introduction; what is at stake; procedural rights of juveniles at intake—the right to counsel, and the right to pre-intake warnings; what can go wrong during the intake process; reasons not to have counsel at intake; proposals for intake reform; and conclusion.

Closing the Widening Net: The Rights of Juveniles at Intake Cover

Good correctional practice includes applying principles of risk based classification to all adult and juvenile offenders while accounting for unique characteristics and concerns of LGBTI and gender non-conforming populations. To ensure a culture of safety, it is important to identify these individuals at intake. A culture of safety includes everyone understanding and practicing respectful, appropriate and professional language.

Intake personnel function as the “gatekeepers” for correctional systems and facilities and are a critical component in the information gathering process. If information obtained at intake is inaccurate or misleading, it can have dire consequences and impact safety. Staff must have clear guidelines allowing for the consistent identification of LGBTI offenders and the collection of key information. Establishing good communication at intake is essential to obtain the necessary information for appropriate housing, medical and mental health referrals, programs, security level, and services in the community. During this broadcast we will demonstrate effective and professional communication with LGBTI offenders during intake and make recommendations to improve the intake process.

Using a variety of methods including on-air discussions and activities, demonstrations and skills practice, this two-day six-hour interactive training broadcast is designed to: establish the relevance of initial information-gathering and how it impacts LGBTI populations from intake to successful reentry; provide recommendations and good correctional practice examples to ensure a culture of respect and safety at intake for LGBTI populations and correctional staff; and provide practical examples and demonstrate professional communication with LGBTI populations at intake.

LGBTI Populations: Intake – Creating a Culture of Safety [Internet Broadcast] Cover

Tasks, assessments, and technology used in prisoner intake systems are examined. Following an executive summary, this report has seven chapters: introduction; national overview of facility characteristics, facility functions, intake components and personnel responsibilities, and obstacles to intake assessments; four chapters review select agency's corrections population, intake facilities, intake process, processing time and flexibility, classification, and needs assessment -- one chapter per Department of Correction(s) from Colorado, Washington (state), Pennsylvania, and North Carolina; and implications of the research. Appendixes include: "Admission Data Summary" and "Diagnostic Narrative Summary" forms (Colorado DOC); "Risk Management Identification Worksheet" form (Washington DOC); and Pennsylvania DOC "Classification Summary."

Prisoner Intake Systems: Assessing Needs and Classifying Prisoners Cover

"Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex (LGBTI) and gender non-conforming inmates represent particularly vulnerable populations with unique medical, safety, and other needs. Though some of the concerns and vulnerabilities faced by these populations are similar, transgender and gender non-conforming inmates are distinct from gay, lesbian, and bisexual inmates in important respects. Basic principles of risk-based classification should be applied with LGBTI populations, accounting for unique characteristics that may affect their risk of victimization. For transgender inmates, this includes making individualized decisions regarding gender placement (i.e., whether the inmate will be housed in a facility for females or for males). Reception staff must have clear guidelines allowing for the consistent identification of LGBTI inmates and collecting key information relevant to individualized risk assessment. Like other important characteristics, an inmate’s sexual orientation or transgender status will not always be immediately obvious at reception, but can typically be identified with relatively simple procedures" (p. 1). This 60-minute training session explains how to improve the correctional intake and classification process for LGBTI inmates. Contents of this zip file include: "Respectful Classification Practices with LGBTI Inmates: Trainer’s Manual" comprised of the following four lessons—Why LGBTI Responsive Intake and Classification Matters, LGBTI Terminology, Implementing Promising Intake and Classification Practices, and Moving Forward; 14 "Myth or Truth" flash cards; and presentation slides.

Respectful Classification Practices with LGBTI Inmates [Lesson Plans] Cover
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