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Interagency collaboration

In June 2008, the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) launched the “Evidence-Based Decision Making in Local Criminal Justice Systems” initiative. While first developed for local-level implementation, the initiative has since been expanded and adapted to state-level decision making, and is now known as the “Evidence-Based Decision Making in State and Local Criminal Justice Systems” initiative. The goal of the initiative is to build a systemwide framework (arrest through final disposition and discharge) that will result in more collaborative, evidence-based decision making and practices in local criminal justice systems. The initiative is grounded in the accumulated knowledge of over two decades of research on the factors that contribute to criminal reoffending and the processes and methods the justice system can employ to interrupt the cycle of reoffense. The effort seeks to equip criminal justice policymakers in local communities and at the state level with the information, processes, and tools that will result in measurable outcomes such as reductions of pretrial misconduct and post-conviction reoffending, increased cost efficiency, and improved public confidence in the justice system.
The EBDM Initiative is currently administered by the Center for Effective Public Policy and The Carey Group in partnership with NIC.

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Criminal Justice Coordinating Councils (CJCCs) are how elected and appointed executive-level policymakers in local jurisdictions, and sometimes states, meet collaboratively to address issues facing the justice system and its constituent agencies. The content on this site describes CJCCs, provides specific guidance for their development and operation, and offers tips on how to sustain them.

What Is a Criminal Justice Coordinating Council?

A Criminal Justice Coordinating Council, or similarly named criminal justice planning body, is how elected and appointed executive-level policymakers in local jurisdictions, and sometimes states, meet collaboratively to address issues facing the justice system and its member agencies.  CJCCs often use a data and a structured planning process proactively to address system issues, manage limited resources, make improvements to the local criminal justice system, meaningfully address crime, and enhance public safety.

The CJCC typically involves justice leaders as well as stakeholders who are indirectly involved in or provide support services to the local criminal justice system. Its purpose is to provide leadership in policy and decision making for the criminal justice system through collaboration and partnership. CJCCs differ from other criminal justice decision making bodies in that they are designed to be permanent, ongoing, advisory boards that not only solve specific problems as they arise, but also more comprehensively monitor and improve the system’s functioning and manage its collective workload.

The National Institute of Corrections (NIC) created this web page to provide up-to-date resources to CJCC members, the criminal justice planners who work for CJCCs, and for other system stakeholders who are interested in establishing or improving their CJCC and system-level problem-solving and management capabilities. Please check out the multitude of information and various links on this page and our micro-site devoted to this topic! "Guidelines for Developing a Criminal Justice Coordinating Council"

This "guide spells out a practical team-based approach to envisioning the kind of criminal justice system a community wants, assessing the current system, and planning and implementing strategies for 'getting it right'" (p.ix). Five sections comprise this manual: an overview of a comprehensive planning process; establishing the policy team and the process; keeping the focus on outcomes; building an understanding of your system; and moving from understanding to change.

Getting It Right: Collaborative Problem Solving for Criminal Justice Cover

This guide is currently being to revised through a cooperative with National Criminal Justice Association (NCJA).

The development, implementation, and operation of a local criminal justice coordinating committee (CJCC) are described. In particular, this guide provides a look at how a CJCC can alleviate jail crowding and accomplish other system improvements. The following sections comprise this guide: executive summary; introduction; a framework for justice planning and coordination; coordinating mechanisms -- a developmental view; and guiding principles for CJCCs. Appendixes provide: a checklist for forming a CJCC; contact information for jurisdictions mentioned; other CJCC resources; a sample charge; and sample bylaws.

Guidelines for Developing a Criminal Justice Coordinating Committee Cover

This guide is currently being to revised through a cooperative with National Criminal Justice Association (NCJA).

“This guide describes for county administrators and other local officials why staff is needed, who becomes good staff, how many staff persons are needed, what the costs are to develop a staff and how staff can be funded, where staff can be found, how the best applicants can be selected, where staff are best housed in the system, and how staff can be trained and evaluated. The guide also offers practical advice for planning staff by describing important activities to do when starting in the position, major roles and responsibilities, and activities to perform as the criminal justice coordinating committee (CJCC) identifies and resolves systemwide issues” (p. xi). Four chapters follow an executive summary: introduction—the need for local planning and coordination with the criminal justice coordinating committee (CJCC) and staff being the solution; obtaining criminal justice planning staff—how the CCJC can hire the best person for the job since the abilities of CJCC staff are very different from other justice system planners; suggestions for the criminal justice planning staff—the major roles they must fulfill; and regional networks of local criminal justice planning functions—the need for networking and collaboration among staff or other committees to achieve better outcomes than by doing it alone. Appendixes provide: a sample Criminal Justice Planner/Analyst job description; and sample mission, vision, and values for criminal justice planning staff or unit.

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The use of collaboration to implement an integrated system reform model is explained. This publication has sections regarding: the need to collaborate; who should be included; the need for structure; sustaining collaboration; a collaborative model for implementing change; essential elements of collaboration; chartering; and consensus decision-making.

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The use of the Mental Health Pretrial Release Program (MHPTR) by the Orange County Jail, in order to identify those individuals with mental illness who can be safely supervised in the community prior to their trials, is discussed. Seven sections comprising this case study are: introduction; summary of initiatives; first steps -- 1999-2004; beyond the Central Receiving Center -- 2004-2006; assessing the impact of new initiatives; looking ahead -- challenges; and dimensions of collaboration. Successful completion of the MHPTR program results in a 17% reduction in costs over 18 months.

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This article examines the benefits and challenges of interagency collaboration between law enforcement and community corrections. "The primary assumption of these programs is that both entities possess distinct intelligence and resources that if combined should better address, prevent, or intervene in the violence perpetuated by this criminogenic population" (p. 2). Sections cover: history of police-probation/parole partnerships; research and evaluation on partnerships; problems associated with partnership; and seven recommendations for policy and practice on police-probation/parole partnerships.

Policy Implications of Police-Probation/Parole Partnerships: A Review of the Empirical Literature Cover

This video explains the use of Criminal Justice Coordinating Councils (CJCCs) in Wisconsin. “Criminal Justice Coordinating Councils allow all key decision makers to come to the table for open and honest discussions. These discussions lead to safer communities, lower costs and closing the revolving door of the criminal justice system.”

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“This report is designed to help collaborating organizations anticipate and address the most common challenges associated with multi-agency performance management systems” (p. 6). Individuals in agencies that are collaborating to reach the same ends can find great strategies for strengthening their bonds and reaching success. This guide includes these sections: introduction; getting started; making it work; using data to improve the initiative; and sustaining the system.

Using Data in Multi-Agency Collaborations: Guiding Performance to Ensure Accountability and Improve Programs Cover
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