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Jail training

Since jail crowding is often called the most pressing problem facing criminal justice systems in the U.S., this 3-hour videoconference aims to help jurisdictions develop effective strategies and techniques for managing jail population levels. Issues discussed include:

  • The systemic problem of crowding and the need for effective system-wide policy
  • Decision points in the system that help control crowding
  • Data collection and analysis
  • Long and short term strategies to reduce jail population levels
  • Identifying and developing systemic strategies to handle special populations
  • And learning how to develop a vision for the future and identifying resources.

 

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Alleviating Jail Crowding: A Systemic Approach - Part One

Since jail crowding is often called the most pressing problem facing criminal justice systems in the U.S., this 3-hour videoconference aims to help jurisdictions develop effective strategies and techniques for managing jail population levels. Issues discussed include:

  • The systemic problem of crowding and the need for effective system-wide policy
  • Decision points in the system that help control crowding
  • Data collection and analysis
  • Long and short term strategies to reduce jail population levels
  • Identifying and developing systemic strategies to handle special populations
  • And learning how to develop a vision for the future and identifying resources.

 

Alleviating Jail Crowding: A Systemic Approach Cover
Alleviating Jail Crowding: A Systemic Approach - Part Two

This video presentation will enable readers to:

  • Understand the problem of jail suicide--rates of suicide in certain groups, the decrease in jail suicide rates, what makes jails risky environments, and challenges of prevention.
  • Describe suicide risk factors, warning signs, and suicide myths that increase ones risk.
  • Discuss intervention best practices--the qualities of a suicide prevention program (a written suicide prevention policy and a culture of prevention among others), the process of suicide prevention, the use of wise correctional techniques, emergency response, and practice, practice, practice. Lessons learned from two case studies and two legal cases are also covered.

 

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Basics and Beyond: Suicide Prevention in Jails

A comprehensive management system, called Inmate Behavior Management (IBM) is being rolled out by the National Institute of Corrections (NIC). It is comprised of six specific elements that work together to control inmate behavior and produce an effective and proficient institution. This document explains “Element 4: Defining and Conveying Expectations for Behavior”. “It is intended to: Review what is known about how positive expectations influence behavior; Identify what concepts are important for jail administrators to understand as they attempt to apply this element to their facilities; and To provide resources that will assist jail administrators in providing training for their staff and in properly identifying positive expectations for inmate behavior “ (p. 3). Seven chapters are contained in this publication: setting and conveying positive expectation of inmate behavior; the basics of setting and conveying expectations; setting positive behavioral expectations; the keys to conveying positive expectations; enforcing positive behavioral expectations; monitoring implementation; and support material regarding the multi-site approach and housing unit specific. Appendixes include: “Tier Expectations for Residents”; “Notice to All Residents: Expectations of Residents, and Expectations of Staff”; and “Inmate Behavior Response Continuum (Acting and Reacting to Inmate Behavior)”. Appendixes include copies of: “Defining and Conveying Expectations – Housing Unit Specific” 4 hour lesson plan (trainer’s guide), participant guide, and PowerPoint slides; and “Defining and Conveying Expectations – Multi-Unit Training” 6 hour lesson plan (trainer’s guide), participant guide, and PowerPoint slides.

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This videoconference addresses issues faced by jails that must deal with increasing numbers of inmates with serious mental illnesses. Topics discussed include:

  • Essential jail-based service components for mentally ill inmates;
  • Creative approaches to meet the service needs of the mentally ill;
  • Identification of potential resources that can be used in the management of this special population;
  • Mental health courts;
  • And how to maintain continuity of care.

 

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This self-paced, self-instruction course explains the role and responsibilities of a jail inspector. Questions are asked at the end of each chapter which lead to answers from and discussion with their supervisors. Supervisors use the publication "Jail Inspection Basics: Supervisors Guide" (NIC accession no. 022123). Chapters cover: legal issues; standards; the inspection process; facility design; communication; government structures and processes; and resources.

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This guide prepares supervisors for conversations with new inspectors taking the "Jail Inspection Basics: An Introductory Self-Study Course for Jail Inspectors" self-guided course (NIC accession no. 022124). Questions and answer keys are provided along with discussion topics for each chapter.

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The NIC Jails Division's services include training, networks, technical assistance, and information resources, such as documents and DVDs. These services are conducted under five initiatives.

Jail Administration

We provide training on key elements in jail administration, jail resource management, and building a productive relationship between jail officials and their funding authority. We also sponsor a peer-training network for large jail administrators, including meetings and an online discussion forum. Technical assistance and information resources cover a wide range of jail administration and operational issues.

Inmate Behavior Management

We provide training, technical assistance, and information resources on the design and operation of direct supervision jails and on key elements in managing inmate behavior in all types of jails. These key elements include assessing inmates’ risks and needs (classification), assigning inmates to housing, meeting inmates’ basic needs, setting and conveying behavioral expectations, supervising inmates, and keeping inmates productively occupied.

New Jail Planning

We provide training, technical assistance, and information resources on all phases of new-jail planning.

Jail Standards and Inspection

We provide training for jail inspectors, a peer-training network for chief jail inspectors, information resources on standards and inspection, and related technical assistance.

Crisis Intervention Teams

We provide training to help local jurisdictions learn the core elements of CITs and assess agency readiness to start a CIT.

Division Chief: Stephen Amos

This collection is comprised of a training program and an agency policy regarding the treatment of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex inmates. "Course Name: L.G.B.T. Awareness" by B. Galindez. "Cultural Diversity/Awareness is essential in terms of adapting to changes and the morphing of all human traits and values. Acceptance and / or tolerance are key elements when the pursuit of cohesion is the overall goal. Lesson Objectives: 1. Student will be able to identify alternate lifestyles; 2. Student will be able to identify alternative lifestyle definitions; 3. Student will be able to identify custodial issues regarding alternative lifestyle arrests; 4. Student will be able to identify Departmental Policy regarding Discrimination / Harassment; [and] 5. Student will become familiar with Lawrence vs. Texas" (p. 4). Included are a lesson plan, PowerPoint slides, pretest and key, handout, final exam and key, and a handout. "Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex, (L.G.B.T.I.)", HCSO Policy # 413. “This Order provides guidelines for the Harris County Sheriff’s Office (HCSO) to follow in order to meet federal statutes and regulations, American Correctional Association (ACA) Standards, National Commission on Correctional Health Care (NCCHC) standards, Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA), and other Texas standards, statutes, regulations, guidelines, directives, or requirements that: A. Facilitate the elimination of discrimination against; and B. Address the appropriate classification, housing and treatment of; and C. Provide for the specific safety, security and medical needs of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Intersex (LGBTI) inmates in a humane and respectful manner while maintaining the safety, security and good order of all HCSO facilities; and D. Establish sanctions for any violation of this policy” (p. 1).

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This issue includes: Foreword, by Richard Geaither, National Institute of Corrections Jails Division; You Can Do It: Putting an End to Pharmacy Cost Increases, by Mike Kalonick, Milwaukee County Sheriff's Office, Detention Bureau; Accreditation for Adult Local Detention Facilities: Moving from Process Measures to Outcome Measures, by Bob Verdeyen, American Correctional Association; Got Training? Training as a Strategic Management Tool for Performance Enhancement, by Tom Reid, National Institute of Corrections Academy, and Connie Clem, NIC Information Center; The Sheriff's Office as a Community Resource in a Hurricane, by Michael L. Wade, Henrico County Sheriff's Office; Inmate Access to Legal Resources & Materials - How Do We Provide Inmates Access to the Courts? by Mark S. Cacho, Orange County Corrections Department; Urban County Issues in New Jail Planning, Design, and Transition, by Barbara Krauth with Michael O'Toole and Ray Nelson; Harris County Sheriff's Office Teams with Community College to Train Inmates, by Jim Albers, Harris County Sheriff's Office; Mission Creep and the Role of the Jail in Public Health Policy, by Donald Leach, Lexington/Fayette Urban County Government; Multnomah County Model Partnership for Custody and Health, by Timothy Moore, Multnomah County Sheriff's Office, and Gayle Burrow, Multnomah County Health Department; Strategic Planning: A 10-Step Approach, by Barry L. Stanton, Prince George's County Department of Corrections, and B. Jasmine Moultri-Fierro

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