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Juvenile detention centers

"A major reduction has taken place in the number of teenagers committed to juvenile facilities in this century. At a time of increasing calls to cut the number of incarcerated adults by 50 percent over 10 years, the juvenile justice system has already attained this goal. Moreover, the decline has taken place without harming public safety" (p. 1). Information provided in this report includes: "Figure 1. Juvenile Facilities and Placements, 1997-2013"; "Table 1. Juvenile Commitment Changes by State, 2001-2013"; "Table 2. Juvenile Commitment Rates by State, 2013"; "Figure 2. Youth Commitment Changes by State, 2001-2013"; "Figure 3. Youth Commitment Rate per 100,000 by State, 2013"; racial and ethnic disparities; "Table 3. Black/White Commitment Rates per 100,000 Juveniles, 2011"; one in three juvenile facilities have closed since 2002; "Figure 4. Number of Juvenile Offenders by Size of Facility, 1997-2013"; "Figure 5. Percent of Juvenile Offenders by Size of Facility, 1997-2013"; and concluding remarks. "Reductions in juvenile offending combined with common-sense policy changes have led to large reductions in the number and percentages of teenagers in large state facilities and generally in confinement … Confinement should be used sparingly and briefly, and only as a last resort. For serious offenders, a successful program should be intensive and address teenaged aggression, focusing on rehabilitation to keep them in confinement only as long as they are a threat to public safety" (p. 6-7).

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Easy Access to the Census of Juveniles in Residential Placement (EZACJRP) was developed to facilitate independent analysis of national data on the characteristics of youth held in residential placement facilities, including detailed information about the youth's age, sex, race/ethnicity, placement status, length of stay, and most serious offense. Crosstabs provide access to national statistics, U.S. and state profiles, state comparisons, methods, glossary, and about EZACJRP.

This 36-hour training program targets skills needed to effectively lead a juvenile corrections or detention facility. Modules contained in this manual are: creating our context for learning; the roles and functions of a juvenile facility director; exploring your leadership style; the impact of today's changing juvenile justice workforce; shaping your facility's vision, mission, values, and culture; addressing your facility's external environment; managing change; developing well being in yourself and others; and developing your individual project plan.

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The goal of this Toolkit is to provide juvenile agencies and facilities of all sizes, political divisions, and geographic locations with a step-by-step guide for preventing, detecting, and eliminating sexual abuse of residents in their custody – and for responding effectively to abuse when it occurs. Prison rape includes all forms of resident sexual abuse within a correctional facility, including state and federal prisons, county and municipal jails, police lock-ups, holding facilities, resident transportation vehicles, juvenile facilities, and community corrections facilities. This toolkit will help assess your juvenile facility’s operations with an eye to improvements. The Toolkit is divided into folders holding materials related to: introductory information about PREA [Prison Rape Elimination Act] and it Standards; a Self-Assessment Checklist with supporting forms “to provide a step-by-step process for juvenile facilities to review and assess policies, procedures, and practices in light of the PREA Standards and accepted best practices”; and additional resources to assist you in PREA-readiness.

Implementing the Prison Rape Elimination Act: Toolkit for Juvenile Agencies and Facilities Cover

"The [Annie E. Casey] Foundation has issued this revised version of the [Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative (JDAI)] standards to acknowledge and incorporate regulations that affect the full range of facility operations. This includes the U.S. Department of Justice regulations for the prevention, detection and response to sexual misconduct in juvenile facilities as part of its implementation of the Prison Rape Elimination Act." Five sections are contained in this guide: introduction; about the revised JDAI Detention Facility Assessment Standards; guidelines to conducting a facility assessment; facility assessment "How To" tools which provide practical recommendations for reviewing written documents and other materials, observing, and interviewing youth and staff at the facility according to each section of the standards; and JDAI Detention Facility Assessment Standards (Revised June 2014)—classification and intake, health and mental health care, access, programming, training and supervision, environment, restraints/room confinement/due process and grievances, safety, and glossary.

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This Standard is divided into these sections: Prevention Planning, Responsive Planning, Training and Education, Screening for Risk of Sexual Victimization and Abusiveness, Reporting, Official Response Following a Resident Report, Investigations, Discipline, Medical and Mental Care, Data Collection and Review, Audits, Auditing and Corrective Action, and State Compliance. [28 C.F.R. Part 115].

The 2015 Census of Juveniles in Residential Placement (CJRP) shows that the number of youth in placement continues to decline. Between 2006 and 2015, nearly 9 in 10 states cut their rates by half or more. The overall number of youth in residential placement decreased 54% to 48,043 in 2015, its lowest level since the data collection began in 1997 when 105,055 youth were held in out-of-home placement” (p. 1). Highlights: 95% were held for a delinquency offence with 5% held for a status offense; 15% were females, 69% were minorities, and 42% of the male population were Black; and 31% were held in private facilities.

"This report, released as a follow-up to No Place For Kids, introduces new evidence on the widespread maltreatment of youth in state-funded juvenile corrections facilities. It tells of high rates of sexual victimization, the heavy-handed use of disciplinary isolation and a growing roster of states where confined youth have been subject to widespread abuse. The four-year update is in — and the news is not good." Two sections follow and introduction and summary: findings from No Place for Kids on the nature, breadth, and extent of maltreatment and abuse in juvenile corrections facilities; and new information about maltreatment in state-funded juvenile correctional facilities. Appendixes cover: additional states with proven maltreatment; recidivist states; and new evidence of and attention to maltreatment. This website provides access to the State-by-State Summary of Systematic or Recurring Maltreatment in Justice Correctional Facilities. You can also find information specific to your state. "The troubling evidence presented in this report should remove any remaining doubt that large conventional juvenile corrections facilities — or plainly stated, youth prisons — are inherently prone to abuse. Given public officials’ inability to prevent maltreatment, or even to clean up youth prisons where inhumane conditions are revealed, it seems difficult to argue that confinement in these institutions offers a safe approach for rehabilitating delinquent youth" (p. 29).

Maltreatment in Juvenile Corrections Facilities: An Update Cover

"This report, released as a follow-up to No Place For Kids [2011], introduces new evidence on the widespread maltreatment of youth in state-funded juvenile corrections facilities. It tells of high rates of sexual victimization, the heavy-handed use of disciplinary isolation and a growing roster of states where confined youth have been subject to widespread abuse. The four-year update is in — and the news is not good." Sections of this report include: introduction and summary; findings from "No Place for Kids" on the nature, breadth, and extent of maltreatment and abuse in juvenile correctional agencies; new information about maltreatment in state-funded juvenile corrections facilities—additional states with proven maltreatment, recidivist states, and new evidence of and attention to maltreatment; and conclusion. This website also provides to access to: evidence of maltreatment in each individual state; national news release; "State-by-State Summary of Maltreatment" publication; and the blog entry "New Report Documents Continuing Maltreatment of Incarcerated Youth".

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These documents comprise the instrument that auditors will use to audit the U.S. Department of Justice's PREA Standards for Juvenile Faculties.” Elements comprising this instrument are: Pre-Audit Questionnaire; Auditor Compliance Tool used to determine PREA compliance; Instructions for PREA Audit Tour of the facility; Interview Protocols for agency head or designee, Superintendent or designee, PREA Compliance Manager/Coordinator, specialized staff, random staff, and residents; Auditor Summary Report” template; Process Map describing the audit process from start to finish; and Checklist of Documentation.

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