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The potential benefits and challenges of applying “seek, test, treat and retain” (STTR) model of care to hepatitis C virus (HCV) in the US criminal justice system is examined. Sections of this article cover: seek—the potential of criminal justice populations for case findings; test—expanding HCV testing through opt-out screening; treat—implications of emerging HCV therapies for correctional settings; retain—ensuring adherence during and after incarceration; and challenges to HCV STTR in the criminal justice system, directions for future research, and conclusions. "The burden of morbidity and mortality associated with chronic HCV infection in the USA is increasing and without significantly increased treatment uptake, will likely continue to do so for several decades. The authors argue that the US criminal justice system is an ideal focus for HCV case finding and treatment due to a high prevalence of infection and large volume of individuals in contact with this system. STTR would identify large numbers of HCV infections, leading to opportunities for secondary prevention and primary care. Important challenges to the implementation of STTR include treatment costs and training of prison medical providers" (p. 164).

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This presentation will increase the user's understanding of the risks associated with the use of restraints, tools to reduce risk, and the proper way to use restraints in custody. Issues discussed include:

  • Potential problems and concerns with the use of restraints;
  • Terminology, physiology, and medical risks associated with the application and use of restraints;
  • Planned and unplanned use of force;
  • The need for policy development, training, and monitoring;
  • Tools to reduce the risk for asphyxia and death;
  • The role and ethical limitations of medical and mental health problems;
  • And legal implications and liability.

 

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"Jails and prisons are constitutionally mandated to provide adequate medical care to those in their care, since prisoners and detainees cannot seek medical treatment on their own. Deliberate indifference to the need for treatment of a known serious medical problem can result in civil liability. A number of cases have made it clear that included in this requirement is treatment for eye and vision problems" (p. 1). This article looks at the case law related to the mandated provision of eye and vision care. Sections cover: cataracts; glaucoma; the impact of high blood pressure, diabetes, and cancer ion eyes and vision and the need for treatment; other medical conditions; physical injury; self-injury; eye and vision specialists; and seven recommendations.

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Transgender individuals are those whose “gender identity” – their personal sense of being male or female – does not match the sex they were assigned at birth. Some transgender people describe this as feeling as if they have been born into the “wrong body” … Juvenile justice professionals need to know that the failure to provide proper treatment for this condition not only can cause serious health problems for transgender children, it can lead to legal liability for detention facilities (p. 1).

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the most common blood-borne infection in the United States, with approximately three million persons living with current infection. Of the two million individuals incarcerated in US federal and state prisons, a February 2015 Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) special report states that 9.8% of these individuals have Hepatitis C. With the advent of a one pill per day treatment regimen, the management of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) in corrections is rapidly evolving.

“Correctional health is a key to public health.” – (Retired) Vice Admiral Richard H. Carmona, M.D., M.P.H., FACS, United States Surgeon General.

This internet broadcast from the National Institute of Correction (NIC) covers the newest innovations in treatment practices, protocols, and management of HCV and its implications for criminal justice, corrections organizations and public health.

Topics discussed include the current prevalence of Hepatitis C in the general public in comparison to the correctional population, highlighting the importance of treating pervasive co-occurring substance use disorders. As one of the first lines of defense in public health, correctional agencies have a critical opportunity to screen, diagnose, and treat.

We will identify several correctional systems throughout the country which are effectively managing their HCV infected population, focusing on successes and challenges of management. Presenters will also share recommendations and resources for jurisdictions looking to implement and improve upon existing programs.

This broadcast will answer the following questions: What is the scope of HCV as an issue, while comparing and contrasting HCV prevalence in the general and corrections populations ; What is HCV?, How is it transmitted?, What is the current prevalence?, and What are current treatment options and related costs?; What are the policies, protocols and procedures implemented by agencies that are effectively managing HCV?; How can agencies improve the coordination of care and services for offenders upon release?; How can we proactively address current and future challenges such as developing and implementing consistent screening and treatment protocols; data collection; pharmaceutical cost management; and collaboration with local, state and federal partners?; and What are recommended resources and next steps for jurisdictions interested in implementing or improving an existing HCV program?

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Hepatitis C in Corrections: Innovations in Treatment and Management of a Public Health Challenge - Part 1 [Internet Broadcast]

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the most common blood-borne infection in the United States, with approximately three million persons living with current infection. Of the two million individuals incarcerated in US federal and state prisons, a February 2015 Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) special report states that 9.8% of these individuals have Hepatitis C. With the advent of a one pill per day treatment regimen, the management of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) in corrections is rapidly evolving.

“Correctional health is a key to public health.” – (Retired) Vice Admiral Richard H. Carmona, M.D., M.P.H., FACS, United States Surgeon General.

This internet broadcast from the National Institute of Correction (NIC) covers the newest innovations in treatment practices, protocols, and management of HCV and its implications for criminal justice, corrections organizations and public health.

Topics discussed include the current prevalence of Hepatitis C in the general public in comparison to the correctional population, highlighting the importance of treating pervasive co-occurring substance use disorders. As one of the first lines of defense in public health, correctional agencies have a critical opportunity to screen, diagnose, and treat.

We will identify several correctional systems throughout the country which are effectively managing their HCV infected population, focusing on successes and challenges of management. Presenters will also share recommendations and resources for jurisdictions looking to implement and improve upon existing programs.

This broadcast will answer the following questions: What is the scope of HCV as an issue, while comparing and contrasting HCV prevalence in the general and corrections populations ; What is HCV?, How is it transmitted?, What is the current prevalence?, and What are current treatment options and related costs?; What are the policies, protocols and procedures implemented by agencies that are effectively managing HCV?; How can agencies improve the coordination of care and services for offenders upon release?; How can we proactively address current and future challenges such as developing and implementing consistent screening and treatment protocols; data collection; pharmaceutical cost management; and collaboration with local, state and federal partners?; and What are recommended resources and next steps for jurisdictions interested in implementing or improving an existing HCV program?

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Hepatitis C in Corrections: Innovations in Treatment and Management of a Public Health Challenge - Part 2 [Internet Broadcast]

This 3-hour program, originally broadcast December 9, 2009, and hosted by the National Institute of Corrections, will address the issue of correctional facility operations and H1N1 (swine flu). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and criminal justice agencies have joined forces to provide some practical strategies for prevention and control.

Participants of this satellite/Internet broadcast will be able to: define the current status of the H1N1 pandemic, including perspectives on its effect on criminal justice issues; outline a rational plan for H1N1 prevention and control strategies, including how to plan for a pandemic and how to plan for the seasonal flu; describe methods for ensuring that staff and inmates receive timely and accurate information about H1N1; and identify and access information resources on H1N1.

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Welcome to the National Institute of Corrections’ Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) Medical Health Care for Sexual Assault Victims in a Confinement Setting Course. The purpose of this course is to assist agencies in meeting the requirements of the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) Section 115.35 “Specialized training: Medical and mental health care”. At the end of this course, you will be able to explain the PREA standards that relate to the provision of medical care for victims of sexual abuse. You will also be able to describe your role and responsibilities in providing this care.

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Contents of these proceedings include: meeting highlights; Domestic Preparedness and the Impact on Large Jails by Sue Menser; meeting participants discussion of issues; Role of the Jail in Public Health Policy by Don Leach; MRSA (Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Areus by Dennis Williams; response by jail and public health officials to contagious disease emergencies; National Sheriffs Association: Weapons of Mass Destruction Initiative: Jail Evacuation Planning and Implementation by Mike Jackson and Joseph Oxley; Legal Issues in Jails2004" by Bill Collins; Topics for the Next Large Jail Network Meeting by Richard Geaither; meeting agenda; and meeting participants list.

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Contents of these proceedings include: meeting highlights; "Cost Containment for Inmate Health Care" by Rebecca Craig; "Taming the Cost of Health Care in Detentions: What Works in San Diego County" by William Sparrow; "Confronting Costs for Medical Care: Open Forum Discussion"; "Increased Medical Costs: Managed Care and Private Contracts" by David Parrish and Dennis Williams; "Public Health and Jails: Challenges and Current Activities" by Roberto Hugh Potter and Dennis Andrews; "Succession Planning: Mentoring and Training Future Middle Managers" by Rocky Hewitt and Al Johnson; "Preventing Jail Suicides" by Jim Babcock; "Update on Large Jail Issues"; "Topics For the Next Large Jail Network Meeting" by Richard Geaither; meeting agenda; and participant list.

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