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Mental health

Mental health screening and assessment is crucial within juvenile correctional facilities (JC). However, limited information is available about the current screening and assessment procedures specifically within JC … The purpose of the current study was to obtain information about the mental health screening and assessment procedures used in JC throughout the United States (p. 379).

“Determining how to provide effective mental health treatment for youth involved in the juvenile justice system – and ensuring that it continues after they exit detention – is one of the most complex challenges facing this system. This report examines how one jurisdiction, Bernalillo County, New Mexico, has taken extraordinary steps to address this challenge by ensuring Medicaid eligibility for detained youth and establishing a licensed, free-standing community mental health clinic adjacent to it detention facility. The report also provides an overview of how the county became an active site in Casey’s Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative and details how their new mental health clinic is being operated and financed, and the lessons emerging from their innovative approach.” Nine chapters make up this report: understanding the mental health challenge for juvenile detention reform; Bernalillo—becoming a model JDAI site; Bernalillo’s mental health challenge; organizing and building a mental health clinic; nuts and bolts of the clinic; assessing the clinic’s impact; key advantages of the onsite clinic; issues and challenges for Bernalillo County and lessons learned; and questions and implications for other jurisdictions.

Bernalillo County Mental Health Clinic Case Study Cover

“[D]espite some recent advances in understanding and acceptance, LGBT [lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender] individuals remain subject to the traumas of negative stereotyping, rejection, marginalization, and discrimination—all of which impede help-seeking behaviors. To compound the problem, LGBT individuals with mental health problems, addictions, or both, may experience additional forms of prejudice and discrimination related to each of those conditions … SAMHSA [Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration] convened the dialogue to develop and/or enhance partnerships among people in recovery, to identify specific factors at the individual and systems levels that can promote or hinder recovery for LGBT individuals, and to help participants gain a better understanding of a variety of perspectives and experiences in advancing recovery for LGBT individuals. In addition, by convening a range of stakeholders to address collaboratively the critical need for improving services, supports, and systems designed to address the mental health and addiction recovery needs of LGBT individuals, SAMHSA anticipated that the suggestions and recommendations summarized in this monograph would serve as a starting point for individuals and organizations interested in taking concrete action to improve recovery opportunities for LGBT individuals. This booklet is comprised of four sections: overview; dialogue themes and findings—eight major themes, personal-level factors that promote or impede recovery, and system and contextual factors that promote or impede recovery; recommendations for action—major and strategic; and milestones in the LGBT mental health consumer movement.

Building Bridges: LGBT Populations cover

This article addresses a little understood issue in corrections—confabulation. "Confabulation can be described as a disruption in normal memory function, whereby the individual unintentionally distorts or fabricates imaginary or non-experienced events without intent to deceive or lie … In other words, individuals who inaccurately integrate incorrect information into their memory and/or subsequently present such information as fact are demonstrating confabulation … Individuals who confabulate are unaware of the falsehood of their statements" (p. 1). Sections of this review include: introduction and overview; diagnostic comorbidity; diagnostic clarification—confabulation and malingering, delusions, or lying; confabulation within correctional settings and important reminders for correctional staff to keep in mind, confabulation in the criminal justice system and possible consequences, clinical considerations, and suggested approaches, and conclusion. "Although confabulation can create significant issues within clinical and forensic settings, the rate of its actual incidence is unknown … Inmates who confabulate may create significant challenges for correctional staff. As a result, correctional professionals are strongly encouraged to understand the risk factors associated with confabulation within offender population" (p. 5).

Confabulation in Correctional Settings: An Exploratory Review Cover

"[H]istorical , legal, and ethical issues relevant to dealing with mental illness in the field of corrections" are discussed (p. iii). Chapters include: introduction; screening and assessment; mental health and substance abuse treatment; use of seclusion, segregation, and restraints; suicide prevention; treating women offenders; psychopharmacological intervention for psychiatric disorders; transitional services; treatment of special populations (e.g., persons with mental retardation or developmental disability, violent offenders, sex offenders, and older adults); and profiles of three states (Maryland, Oregon, and Texas).

Effective Prison Mental Health Services: Guidelines to Expand and Improve Treatment Cover

This study examines the mental health needs of a detained juvenile justice population within the context of legislative reform to better identify targets of treatment to meet these changing needs. With low-level offenders actively diverted from the system, the purpose of this study is to identify the mental health needs of the reduced population of youth who are placed in a custodial setting (p. 3).

People with co-occurring mental illnesses and substance use disorders—also known simply as co-occurring disorders—have complex needs that require integrated responses across jails and behavioral health systems. However, staff often do not know how many people with co-occurring disorders reside in the jail or do not know how to respond when they recognize the symptoms. This brief outlines how jail administrators and staff can improve their responses to this population by implementing practices that focus on identification and provision of services: conducting standard screening and assessment for both, linking people to services through collaborative comprehensive case management, and assessing effectiveness through regular performance measurement tactics.

Proceedings from hearings regarding mentally ill offenders are provided. Contents of this publication include: executive summary; outline of proceedings; opening remarks and introduction; hearing panel -- setting the context -- the increasing number of people with mental illness under corrections supervision -- origins of the problem and key strategies for addressing it; hearing panel -- case studies of state and local mental health and corrections collaboration; summary of day's proceedings; Day Two remarks; hearing panel -- the role of family members, advocates, and consumers in corrections and mental health collaboration; open forum -- reflections and analysis; and summary and conclusions.

Improving the Response to Offenders with Mental Illness Through Mental Health and Criminal Justice Collaboration Cover

This brief reviews the prevalence of mental health issues among youth in the juvenile justice system, including: 1) the types of disorders among youth across juvenile justice settings, 2) the rates of adversity and trauma among these youth, and 3) the impact of these disorders on the system. The brief describes areas where the juvenile justice system can improve mental health supports and services for youth involved in or at risk of involvement in the system, along with recommendations for making such improvements.

“Children who come to the attention of the juvenile justice system are a challenging and underserved population. The National Child Traumatic Stress Network has developed resources to help juvenile justice professionals understand and provide trauma-focused services to these youth.” Resources are organized according to whether they are intended for either mental health and juvenile justice professionals or judges and advocates.

Juvenile Justice System Cover

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