Back to top

Minorities

Program/Agency contact, program objectives, applicant eligibility, eligible beneficiaries, and types of assistance available from 15 federal agencies are provided. Appendixes contain information about: Indian Tribal entities (within the contiguous 48 states) recognized and eligible to receive services from the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs; recognized and eligible Native entities within Alaska; U.S. Department websites; criminal justice and substance abuse resources, information, and technical assistance; and a glossary.

Tribal Resource Guide Cover

To help you better understand racial and ethnic disparities and how juvenile justice is being administered in your county, state, and nationwide, BI's interactive tools provide customizable searches. There are five interactive combination maps/trend charts/count charts.

This Article provides a thorough description and diagnosis of the reasons that the Indian country juvenile justice system continues to fail Native youth, one that has been missing from the legal and policy literature. It provides a careful analysis of the law governing juvenile delinquency jurisdiction in Indian country. While it echoes others’ observations that the confusing jurisdictional web is part of the reason Native youth remain neglected and invisible in federal and state systems, and ill-served by tribal systems, this Article’s detailed analysis of the law reveals much greater potential for tribal control under current laws than others assume exists. More importantly, the Article moves beyond the familiar complaint about the jurisdictional web to examine the inner workings of each sovereign’s approach to Indian country justice, providing the fuller picture necessary to identify and implement both large-scale and small-scale solutions. As federal and tribal leaders debate legal and policy changes to the Indian country juvenile justice system, including potential amendments to the Federal Juvenile Delinquency Act, the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act, federal criminal laws, and Public Law 280, this Article’s timely investigation of barriers to improvement will elucidate a better path to healing, not harming, Native youth (p. 49).

"This fact sheet is designed to serve as an overview of two family tools that help people visualize the connections within families and the connections families have to their community: genograms and ecomaps. This fact sheet also provides ideas for tribal probation officers about how they can incorporate family mapping tools into their work. Tribal probation officers may find that family mapping tools are useful for a number of reasons. Drawing a family map with a client can encourage them to open up and further develop a cooperative relationship with you as their probation officer. Seeing family and other connections represented visually can help probationers recognize links that may not otherwise be apparent to them. Visual tools can also be a source of pride, as probationers can chart changes to their maps, consolidate information about key contacts, and identify the supports they can access" (p. 2). A genomap is basically a family tree which shows the relationships between members in a probationer's family. An ecomap visually shows the links of resources and service providers that exist outside the family that can offer assistance to a probationer. The ways to make both of these family maps are provided.

Using Family Mapping Tools to Enhance Outcomes for Tribal Members under Community Supervision Cover

"The United States has long been a haven for those fleeing persecution and oppression. But today, the treatment for asylum seekers can be so terrible that some are asking to be sent back to the very countries they were escaping. This includes women who are locked up alongside men, sometimes the very men they were trying to escape … This is life for transgender women in U.S. immigration detention facilities … A six-month Fusion investigation found that conditions for transgender women locked up by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) are often humiliating, dangerous, and even deadly … What makes ICE detainees different from prisoners is that they aren’t behind bars serving criminal sentences. Rather, they are locked up, waiting to see a judge who will decide whether or not they’ll be deported. A growing number of state and federal prisons across the country allow for transgender individuals to be housed based on their gender identity, regardless of their genitalia or sex at birth." Some of the sobering facts about transgender people under ICE detention are: on average, 75 transgender detainees are locked up each night—10% transgender men and 90% transgender women; of every 500 individuals, 1 detainee is transgender; of every 5 victims of confirmed sexual abuse, 1 victim is transgender. This report discusses: the housing of transgender detainees—transgender women not being housed with the female population; targets for prison rape during ICE detention; the detention-bed mandate of 2009; denial of needed medication; and alternative to detention.

Why Did the U.S. Lock Up these Women with Men? A Fusion Investigation Cover

Issues related to the ability of ex-offenders to get jobs after their release from imprisonment in Wisconsin are explored. An executive summary presents a review of findings and recommendations. This report is divided into two parts: mass incarceration of African American males—the most for any state in the United States; and transportation barriers to employment—suspensions of driver’s licenses due to not paying fines. “Given wide disparities in income among racial groups in Wisconsin and the intense levels of segregation in the Milwaukee metropolitan area, large numbers of ex-offenders released from Wisconsin correctional institutions reside in the poorest neighborhoods of Milwaukee – areas which have seen dramatic job losses and foreclosure actions during the economic recession. Bringing ex-offenders into full engagement in the current labor force is one of the most important challenges for Milwaukee and for the state” (p. 7).

Wisconsin’s Mass Incarceration of African American Males: Workforce Challenges for 2013 Cover

"Protecting employees against workplace harassment is an important obligation of law enforcement and correctional agencies as employers. Harassment is a corrosive element in an agency’s functioning, can undermine morale, and unfairly subjects hard-working employees to daily torments that add to the burdens and responsibilities that they have to cope with to effectively do their job. Additionally, as has long been clear, workplace harassment on the basis of sex or race, as well as other protected categories, is illegal and can lead to lawsuits and substantial damage awards" (p. 201). Employer liability resulting from sexual harassment perpetrated by a supervisor is explained. Part 1 addresses: harassment as in general by a supervisor; Supreme Court definition of a supervisor; quid pro quo sexual harassment; hostile environment; and same sex and sexual orientation harassment. Part 2 covers: racial harassment; other forms of harassment; suggestions to consider; and additional resources for information.

Workplace Harassment Cover

“Over the past few years, young women of color have been represented at a disproportionately high rate among clients coming to Community Legal Services (CLS) for help with barriers to employment caused by criminal records. This is particularly notable, as the vast majority of research, programming, and policy attention regarding criminal records and barriers to employment have focused on men. The impact of criminal records on young women seeking employment has largely been overlooked” (p. 2). This publication presents data showing the degree to which minority women are impacted by their past criminal records. Sections cover: issue overview; observations from CLS’s experiences with young female clients; local and national trends in arrest data, by gender; characteristics of women with criminal records; impact on employment; and five policy recommendations to address long-term joblessness of female offenders.

Young Women of Color with Criminal Records: A Barrier to Economic Stability for Low-Income Families and Communities Cover

Although the United States still leads the industrialized world in the rate at which it locks up young people, the youth confinement rate in the US is rapidly declining. This table shows rates of confined youth by ethnicity per state.

Although the United States still leads the industrialized world in the rate at which it locks up young people, the youth confinement rate in the US is rapidly declining. This table shows rates of confined youth by ethnicity per state.

Pages

Subscribe to Minorities