Back to top

Monetary restitution

Lessons learned in the collection of restitution by five programs are explained. “From statewide, multi-year initiatives to vigorous local programs, it is [the authors’] hope that these examples will inspire advocates and officials around the country to reexamine their own policies and programs and renew their commitment to improving the lives of crime victims through the collection of restitution” (p. 5). Papers contained in this document are: “Michigan’s Trial Court Collections Project: Collection of Court-ordered Fines, Fees, Costs, and Victim Restitution” by Elizabeth A. Barber; “The Vermont Model: A Victim-Centered Approach to Restitution” by Judy Rex and Elaine Boyce; “Restitution Enforcement Court Superior Court Maricopa County: A Practical Approach to Assure Restitution to Victims” by Roland J. Steinle, III; “Project Payback: A Juvenile Restitution Program” by Gretchen Howard; and “California’s Enhanced Collections Unit, Judicial Council of California, Administrative Office of the Courts” by Jessica Sanora. The three most common elements for effective restitution collection are leadership, commitment to change, and openness to new thinking.

Making Restitution Real: Five Case Studies on Improving Restitution Collection Cover
Subscribe to Monetary restitution