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Development of outcome-based performance systems of management for correctional agencies has been an important initiative for the Association of State Correctional Administrators (ASCA) since the early 1990s. It was envisioned as a means of assessing performance across jurisdictions, promoting the use of performance-based management by correctional agencies, and improving the planning and management capacities of correctional organizations across the nation. Our specific project objectives were threefold: 1) identify a series of correctional measures that are considered to be the most crucial aspects of quality incarceration; 2) develop a set of indicators that reflect the essence of each measure; and, 3) define each indicator to allow for standard application of the measures across jurisdictions. Recognizing the complexity and scope of the potential performance measures for correctional agencies, for the purposes of this project, we focused on measures of public safety, institutional safety, treatment and programming, and contextual data. This report describes our work to date, identifies the performance indicators developed by the subcommittee, summarizes a preliminary assessment of state correctional agencies’ capacity to participate, and outlines the next steps for continued development of a national performance measurement system.

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"The purpose of this paper is to introduce prison administrators and staff to an accumulated body of knowledge regarding correctional practice to enhance their management of their prisons" (p.1). Sections comprising this discussion paper are: introduction -- transition from prison to the community, effective correctional practice, overview of prison research findings for prison classification, and summary; an overview of prison classification and risk assessment – correctional programming, guidelines, staff, and impact; and prison realities -- organizational culture and priorities, staff recruitment and training, role of staff, additional considerations (such as gangs, drugs, threats, and extortion), excellence in prison practice, implications for correctional practice, anticipated goals and outcomes, integration with community corrections, and corporate accountability. Provided as appendixes are "Eight Evidence-Based Principles for Effective Practice: Linking to Prison-Based Corrections" and "Measuring Inmate Competencies."

Evidence-Based Practice Cover

This report explains how violence due to prison radicalization by Muslims is a rare event. "This report assesses the radicalization of Muslim prisoners in post-9/11 America. In the last decade, Muslim prisoners have been scrutinized for ties to terrorist and other extremist organizations, not to mention characterized as both a “threat” and a “danger” to national security, due to the influence of foreign jihadist movements. However, closer scrutiny shows that these fears have failed to materialize—indeed, despite the existence of an estimated 350,000 Muslim prisoners, there is little evidence of widespread radicalization or successful foreign recruitment, and only one documented case of prison-based terrorist activity. Nonetheless, some prison systems have implemented an aggressive posture toward these inmates and have made suppressive tactics their bedrock policy. This approach unfortunately overlooks Islam’s long history of positive influence on prisoners, including supporting inmate rehabilitation for decades " (p. 5). Sections of this report following an executive summary include: introduction to the politics of Islam and radicalization in American prisons—social fears vs. social science; how Islam operates in American prisons—effects of Islamic values and beliefs on inmate behavior, and the role of social networks; investigating extremist views and violence among Muslim inmates—failure to define terms and the problem, whether prisons are factories for extremists, and understanding the challenges of extremist ideology; and conclusion—false alarms, toward best practices, fostering an Islamic marketplace, and stabilizing prisoner re-entry.

Facts and Fictions about Islam in Prison: Assessing Prisoner Radicalization in Post-9/11 America Cover

Issues regarding health conditions and health education of incarcerated minority women are discussed in this paper. Topics covered include: incarcerated women's health care—infectious and chronic diseases, disease-specific care, mental health, and programs specifically for incarcerated females; health education programs in prison—education strategies from intake to reentry, and collaborative prison-community partnerships; return to the community-- post release access to care; and a conclusion explaining the need for "[I]mplementation of easy health care access, health education programs and treatment interventions during and post incarceration allow incarcerated women an opportunity to maintain medical treatment practices and have positive health outcomes" (p. 6).

Forgotten Women: Incarceration and Health Concerns of Minority Women cover

This is a 2-hour forum on gang-related criminal activity in the community and within the correctional environment. Program objectives are to help viewers: identify gangs and deviant groups; create strategies for interagency collaboration; implement strategies for identification and management of gangs; and understand the impact of gangs on the community. 

The first half of the program focuses on problems related to gangs in the community. Points addressed include identifying gangs and deviant groups, myths vs. reality of gangs, trends and future implications, and gang management - what works in the community. 

The second half of the program deals with topics concerning gangs in institutions, such as agency collaboration, identifying and monitoring gangs, gang management in jails and prisons, and trends and future implications, and gang management - what works in the community.

Text includes various papers, text for overheads, and gang quizzes. 

Gangs, Community and Corrections  Cover

"Presents national and state-level data on the number of inmate deaths that occurred in local jails and state prisons, the distribution of deaths across jails, and the aggregate count of deaths in federal prisons. The report presents annual counts and 14-year trends between 2000 and 2013 in deaths in custody. It provides mortality rates per 100,000 inmates in custody in jail or prison; details the causes of death, including deaths attributed to homicide, suicide, illness, intoxication, and accidental injury; describes decedents' characteristics, including age, sex, race or Hispanic origin, legal and hold status, and time served; and specifies the state where the deaths occurred. Data are from the Bureau of Justice Statistics' Deaths in Custody Reporting Program, initiated in 2000 under the Death in Custody Reporting Act of 2000 (P.L. 106-297). Some highlights include: local jail inmate deaths increased 1%, from 958 deaths in 2012 to 967 deaths in 2013; suicides in local jails increased 9%, from 300 suicides in 2012 to 327 in 2013; deaths in prison increased from 3,357 in 2012 to 3,479 in 2013, reaching the highest number since the prison data collection began in 2001--total number of deaths increased 4% between 2012 and 2013; Illness-related deaths accounted for 89% of all deaths in prison in 2013.

Mortality In Local Jails And State Prisons, 2000–2013 - Statistical Tables cover

Results from projects implementing new strategies for drug interdiction within an institutional setting are presented. This compilation includes findings from final evaluation reports provided by Maryland, California, Kansas, New York, and Florida.

"The Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) is committed to sustainable operations to protect our natural environment and improve quality of life for healthier communities. Sustainable practices will protect our environment, save taxpayer money, and model positive practices to the adults in DOC" (p. 3). This publication illustrates how the Oregon DOC is working on increasing its sustainable operations. Topics covered include: the creation of a sustainable system; field mowing program; Sustainability in Prisons Project (SPP); solar hot water; recycling; EarthWISE certification; animal rehabilitation; fuel efficiency; community involvement; LED lighting; geothermal and alternative energy efficiency; utility tracking; Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD) reduction; organic gardening and composting; Canine Companions for Independence (CCI); eco-roof; Environmentally Preferable Purchasing (EPP)—"buying green"; Oregon Accountability Model (OAM); conservation; and greenhouse ecology.

Oregon Sustainability 2013 Cover

This report from the Vera Institute of Justice provides information collected directly from states and the federal Bureau of Prisons to estimate the number of people in prison at the end of 2017.

"The data revealed that the recent trend of decreasing prison incarceration continued in 2017, with the total U.S. prison population dropping below 1.5 million for the first time since 2004. Despite the overall declines, 20 states increased their prison population, leaving 10 states with all-time-high numbers of people in prison."

The complete report, population data spreadsheet and an interactive map of the data can be found here.

This document provides correctional facilities definitions and the rules for maintaining statistics for their institutions. Including, but not limited to, operational capacity, inmates, housed, inmates outsourced, male security staff, female security, institutional staff.

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