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Recidivism

If you are concerned about recidivism, this article is for you. The author explains how six integrated practices will lower your recidivism rates. These are: risk/needs assessment; individual motivators; target the appropriate intervention; rewire the brain; increase positive reinforcement; and ongoing support.

6 Evidence-Based Practices Proven to Lower Recidivism: Learning to Trust the Research Cover

This report summarizes the first national review of the recidivism and post-release effects of the Prison Industries Enhancement Certification Program (PIECP) engaging state prison inmates in private sector jobs since 1979" (p. 6). Sections following an executive summary are: abstract; introduction; methods; key findings and discussion regarding how PIECP participation increases post-release employment and reduces recidivism; and policy recommendations.

Correctional Industries Preparing Inmates for Re-Entry: Recidivism & Post-Release Cover

Results of a cost-benefit analysis of correctional industries programs are provided. Sections of this report are: research methods; research results; benefits and costs; and conclusion. "We find that correctional industries programs for adult offenders in prison can achieve a statistically significant reduction in recidivism rates, and that a reasonably priced program generates about $6.70 in benefits per dollar of cost (p. 2)."

Correctional Industries Programs for Adult Offenders in Prison Cover

This guide "is specifically designed to empower each Correctional Industries organization, no matter the size or structure, to design and implement its program with an emphasis on maximizing system impact. The model supports implementing effective strategies through the context of work. The results are focused on increasing an individual’s success after release. The model provides a holistic approach to evaluating where you are and how to proceed with recommendations based on promising and evidence-based practices. Implementing this model will result in long-term sustainability for the organization and reduced recidivism for the system. It will develop a culture of offender development and employability, preparing an individual for gainful attachment to the workforce."

"The guide was developed using a systems approach to achieve the following: Reduce Recidivism; Increase Public Safety; Improve Offender Success; Ensure Sustainability; [and] Enhance Operations."

Access is provided to the following sections: About This Guide--systems thinking and focus, why a correctional industries program should use this model, components at a glance, the journey begins, and a glossary of terms; Components—incorporate strategic planning, maintain financial sustainability, recruit/develop/retain staff, engage stakeholders, replicate private industry environment, implement certificate based soft skills training, provide certified technical skills training, maximize offender job opportunities, create a culture of offender employment readiness and retention, and provide post release employment services; and Resources—studies, articles and reports, and websites.

Correctional Industries screenshot

The effect of work release facilities in Washington State on recidivism is assessed. This report is divided into three sections: evaluation of work release program; identification of facilities with the greatest effectiveness on recidivism; and examination of work release practices. While three of four studies show that work release reduces recidivism, more research is warranted for broader contemporary results.

Does Participation in Washington's Work Release Facilities Reduce Recidivism? Cover

This resource presents a concrete list of dos and don’ts that policymakers and justice system leaders can use to guide policy and practice changes focused on young adults in the juvenile and adult criminal justice systems. Informed by both research and practice, the list outlines supervision and service strategies that states and localities should and should not implement in order to use resources more efficiently to improve outcomes for young adults in the justice system.

The need to replace the incarceration of those arrested for non-violent drug possession in Texas with community-based drug treatment is examined. The strategies described in this publication can be effectively used in other agencies. Sections of this report include: background of substance abuse and drug offenses in Texas—costly incarceration, incarceration vs. treatment costs, community supervision as an alternative to incarceration, and recidivism and revocation among individuals with drug offenses; understanding the cycle of drug addiction—related crimes and special considerations; treatment options and information; legislative efforts to improve responses to low-level drug offenses; solutions; and conclusion. “For those with addiction, drug treatment is a more effective strategy to treat the individual, reduce recidivism, and lower costs to the state. Texas should take steps to aggressively and proactively address drug addiction, and thereby decrease associated crime, by promoting medical and public health responses to this issue” (p. 1).

Effective Approaches to Drug Crimes in Texas: Strategies to Reduce Crime, Save Money, and Treat Addiction Cover

This paper will discuss recidivism among juveniles, primarily aged 12-18 years old, and evaluate which methods best prevent recidivism.

This “recent outcome evaluation of the InnerChange Freedom Initiative (InnerChange), a faith-based prisoner reentry program that has operated within Minnesota’s prison system since 2002, showed the program is effective in lowering recidivism. This study extends research on InnerChange by conducting a cost-benefit analysis of the program. Because InnerChange relies heavily on volunteers and program costs are privately funded, the program exacts no additional costs to the State of Minnesota. As a result, this study focuse[s] on estimating the program’s benefits by examining recidivism and post-release employment” (p. 227). Results show that InnerChange substantially reduced recidivism, increased post-release employment, both at a savings of $8,300 per participant.

Estimating the Benefits Cover

The effectiveness of "Thinking for a Change" -- a cognitive behavioral program for adult probationers -- is investigated. Following an abstract, this dissertation contains these chapters: introduction; literature review; study purpose and major aims; method; results; and discussion. While "results for changes and improvements in criminal sentiments found in the present study [are] disappointing and counter to expectation," there are significant positive changes in social skills and social problem-solving (p. 90). More importantly, new criminal offense rates for group completers dropped 33%.

Evaluation of the Efficacy of a Cognitive Behavioral Program for Offenders on Probation:  Thinking for a Change Cover

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