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This report describes "Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) activities to collect and improve data on crime and justice in Indian country, as required by the Tribal Law and Order Act, 2010. The report summarizes BJS’s efforts in 2015 to field a survey on the capabilities and caseloads of tribal court systems; develop a survey of all state and local law enforcement agencies and prosecutors’ offices serving Indian country; study the handling of American Indian and Alaska Native juvenile and adult criminal cases in the federal justice system; and enhance current funding programs to support tribal participation in regional and national criminal justice databases. It summarizes tribal eligibility for Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant awards from 2008 to 2015, and presents Uniform Crime Reporting Program statistics on offenses reported by tribal law enforcement agencies from 2008 to 2013. Highlights: … at midyear 2013, a total of 2,287 inmates were confined in 79 Indian country jails—a 3.3% decrease from the 2,364 inmates confined at midyear 2012; and at midyear 2014, local jails held about 10,400 American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) inmates (both tribal and nontribal AIAN), which was 1.4% of the total (744,600) jail inmate population. Nearly half (47%) of all AIAN jail inmates were in western states."

Tribal Crime Data Collection Activities, 2015 Cover

This report is the 11th in a series that began in 2011 to meet the reporting requirements of the Tribal Law and Order Act of 2010 (TLOA). It describes activities by the Bureau of Justice Statistics to collect and improve data on crime and justice in Indian country. It summarizes funding to enhance tribal participation in national records and information systems and highlights data collection activities covering tribal populations.

"This fact sheet reveals broad variation in nationwide incarceration trends up through 2013. While the number of people in prison in the United States has stabilized in recent years, incarceration trends among the states have varied significantly. Two-thirds of states (34) have experienced at least a modest decline since 1999, while one-third (16) have had continued rises in their prison populations. Nine states have produced double-digit declines during this period, led by New Jersey (29% since 1999), New York (27% since 1999), and California (22% since 2006, though partly offset by increasing jail use)" (p. 1). Since 2009 the total state prison population has decreased 2.4%, with the federal prison population decreasing 1%.

U.S. Prison Population Trends: Broad Variation Among States in Recent Years Cover

This is by far the best website for investigating who are the youth that are incarcerated in the United States and what their offenses are. The statistics are especially useful for illustrating the disparity in juvenile ethnic/racial groups. “The Burns Institute is in pursuit of an equitable and excellent juvenile justice system. A system used sparingly and appropriately. We know that our current juvenile justice system is not equitable, excellent, or used sparingly and appropriately. More than 61,000 youth were incarcerated on any given night in 2011, most (75 percent) for non-violent offenses. The majority (65 percent) were youth of color. Nationwide, youth of color are significantly more likely to be incarcerated than White youth. In 2011: Black youth were 4.6 times as likely; Native American youth were 3.2 times as likely; and Latino youth were 1.8 times as likely. The U.S. stands out in its use of youth incarceration. We incarcerate youth at higher rates than anywhere in the world: five times the rate of South Africa; 15 times the rate of Germany and 30 times the rate of Italy. With more than 75 percent of youth locked up for non-violent offenses, the U.S does not have an alarming crime problem; we have an alarming incarceration problem. And it’s a problem primarily for youth of color. To solve the problem, we need to better understand it. To help you better understand racial and ethnic disparities and how juvenile justice is being administered in your county, state, and nationwide, BI's interactive tools provide customizable searches.” There are five interactive customizable charts: detention rates; disparity gap incarceration gap—youth of color vs White; disparity gap incarceration gap—Black vs White; disparity gap incarceration gap—Latino vs White; and incarcerated nonviolent offenses.

Unbalanced Juvenile Justice Cover

This report presents "counts and rates of veterans in state and federal prison and local jail in 2011 and 2012. This report describes incarcerated veterans by demographic characteristics, military characteristics, and disability and mental health status. It describes current offense, sentencing, and criminal history characteristics by veteran status. It also examines combat experience associated with lifetime mental health disorders among incarcerated veterans … Highlights: The number of veterans incarcerated in state and federal prison and local jail decreased from 203,000 in 2004 to 181,500 in 2011–12; The total incarceration rate in 2011–12 for veterans (855 per 100,000 veterans in the United States) was lower than the rate for nonveterans (968 per 100,000 U.S. residents); Non-Hispanic black and Hispanic inmates made up a significantly smaller proportion of incarcerated veterans (38% in prison and 44% in jail), compared to incarcerated non-Hispanic black and Hispanic nonveterans (63% in prison and 59% in jail); A greater percentage of veterans (64%) than nonveterans (48%) were sentenced for violent offenses; [and] An estimated 43% of veterans and 55% of nonveterans in prison had four or more prior arrests."

Veterans In Prison And Jail, 2011–2012 cover

"All crime data have flaws, but sexual assault data are notoriously inaccurate. Why are these data so problematic? And what are the consequences for how we address sexual violence in the United States? Data on rape and sexual assault suffer from inconsistent estimates and underreporting, leading to misunderstandings about the extent of the problem and adequate policy solutions. Let’s look at two major sources of information on the topic: survey-based studies that estimate prevalence of sexual assaults and criminal justice system data. In this post, we look at data on female victims of sexual violence, since most existing reports and statistics focus on women. Data on sexual assault against men are especially sparse; we know even less about the experiences of male victims" (p. 1). Sections cover: two different surveys, two different stories—National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) and the National Intimate Partner Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS); and why criminal justice data can be misleading.

Why do rates of sexual assault prevalence vary from report to report? cover

"This third edition of the World Female Imprisonment List shows the number of women and girls held in penal institutions in 219 prison systems in independent countries and dependent territories. The figures include both pre-trial detainees/remand prisoners and those who have been convicted and sentenced. The List also shows the percentage of women and girls within each national prison population and the proportion of the national population that are imprisoned females (the female prison population rate per 100,000 of the national population). The information is the latest available at the end of July 2015. In addition, this edition includes information about trends in female prison population levels since 2000" (p. 1). Some of the findings from this report are: 700,000 women and girls are being held in correctional institutions throughout the world. A little over 29% of these are held in the United States (205,400). China (103,766), the Russian Federation (53,304), and Thailand (44,751) follow. The largest increase in incarceration has been in Oceania (103.3%) with the smallest in European countries (4.4%).

World Female Imprisonment List|Third Edition Cover

Now in its 14th edition, an updated online version of the Corrections Environment Scan is presented here. Renamed the Corrections Environmental Scan in 2017, it continues to evolve into a popular tool that corrections practitioners use to inform their work in jails, prisons, and community supervision.

The report is arranged into five topics: Population Demographics, Economy, Workforce, Technology, and Statistics, with the special highlighted topic: Justice Involved Women. The Corrections Environmental Scan is intended to give a broad overview of the latest news and trends in these topics, from the corrections, domestic, and global perspectives.

Now in its thirteenth edition, an updated online version of the Corrections Environment Scan is presented for the first time. Renamed the Corrections Environmental Scan in 2017, it continues to evolve into a popular tool that corrections practitioners use to inform their work in jails, prisons, and community supervision.

The report is arranged into five topics: Population Demographics, Economy, Workforce, Technology, and Statistics, with the special highlighted topic: Criminal Justice Reform. The Corrections Environmental Scan is intended to give a broad overview of the latest news and trends in these topics, from the corrections, domestic and global perspective.

A screenshot of the Corrections Environmental Scan Website

Beginning in the late 1990’s, the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) Information Center began scanning social, economic, and corrections issues to inform the development of training programs and services offered by NIC. This report, now in its twelfth edition, and renamed from the Environmental Scan to the Corrections Environmental Scan, has continued to evolve into a popular tool that corrections practitioners use to inform their work in jails, prisons, and community corrections. Because there are many issues beyond what is addressed in this environmental scan that will potentially influence corrections, this report is intended to give a broad overview of selected current and anticipated trends and not to be comprehensive in scope. The methods for selecting articles, reports, and other materials was based on a scan of news sources, websites, and corrections-specific publications. As part of the ongoing work of the NIC Information Center in supporting the work of corrections professionals, staff regularly monitors reports and publications from state, national, global, and independent sources. The report is arranged with the topics: population, demographics, economy, workforce, technology, substance abuse and mental health, healthcare, and crime and recidivism statistics. Each section gives a summary of trends and developments in corrections, and includes national and global perspectives. A new feature debuts the new NIC website and highlights the State Statistics Information page. This web page provides lists of resources related to local, state, and federal statistics displayed to help you see the current state of the corrections industry as of the last set of reported data.

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