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Strategic planning

Designed specifically for correctional trainers from all areas of corrections, this twenty-four-hour seminar instructs participants in the development of a strategic action plan that will link training with agency needs. Communication styles, individual and organizational change theory, and social marketing are topics discussed. The manual contains lesson plans and a participant's guide. The seminar was held in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, September 14-16, 1993.

Bridging the Gap:  Winning Administration's Support for Training Cover

“This guide, a product of the National institute of Corrections’ (NIC’s) Institutional Culture Initiative, presents a model designed to produce higher quality work, build collaboration and interdependence, create safer and more secure environments, and, ultimately, help correctional facilities move strategically toward more positive culture that will improve the quality of life for both staff and offenders" (p.iii). Chapters contained in this guide are:

  • What organizational culture is;
  • Why culture examination and strategic planning, management, and response are necessary;
  • Building culture -- a new approach to strategic planning and management;
  • What one needs to know about change;
  • Rubik’s Cube Model of Strategic Planning;
  • Implementing the Cube Model of Strategic Planning;
  • Managing facility communications;
  • Measuring your work;
  • Strategic management and response;
  • Rubik’s Cube Model of Strategic Management;
  • And using the Cube model of Strategic Management.

Appendixes provide: answers to frequently asked questions and myths about strategic planning; sample data-gathering tools; sample planning tools; guidelines for using the Organizational Culture Inventory; sample agenda for the kickoff meeting; copies of PowerPoint presentation overheads for the kickoff meeting; and literature review.

Building Culture Strategically:  A Team Approach for Corrections Cover

Issues impacting the management of federal workforce are reviewed. In particular, “[b]y tapping into knowledge management and understanding the distinctions among generation cohorts, managers can connect the dots between succession planning, human capital management, strategic planning, and fiscal responsibility” (p. 1). Topics discussed include: generation cohorts—Traditionalists, Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Millennials; current research on federal succession planning efforts; and failure to plan has many costs. “Succession planning is an investment in leadership training, and must begin in lower levels of the workforce. Leaders must prepare for succession to harness workforce costs and national security” (p. 1).

Connecting the Dots Among People, Budgets and Missions Cover

The process by which it was determined what knowledge, skills, and abilities jail leaders should have in order to be successful at their jobs is explained. Those 22 identified competencies are described in detail. Sections of this report include: introduction; overview of the literature review; Advisory Committee deliberations; subsequent refinements; focus group sessions at national conferences; drilling-down to the KSAs; methods; outcomes for the core competencies and related charts; and summary and conclusions. It should be noted that “that the individual components of KSAs are so interrelated that one cannot occur without the other” (p. 18).

Identifying Core Competencies and Required Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities (KSAs) for Jail Leaders: Methods and Outcomes Cover

This issue includes: Foreword, by Richard Geaither, National Institute of Corrections Jails Division; You Can Do It: Putting an End to Pharmacy Cost Increases, by Mike Kalonick, Milwaukee County Sheriff's Office, Detention Bureau; Accreditation for Adult Local Detention Facilities: Moving from Process Measures to Outcome Measures, by Bob Verdeyen, American Correctional Association; Got Training? Training as a Strategic Management Tool for Performance Enhancement, by Tom Reid, National Institute of Corrections Academy, and Connie Clem, NIC Information Center; The Sheriff's Office as a Community Resource in a Hurricane, by Michael L. Wade, Henrico County Sheriff's Office; Inmate Access to Legal Resources & Materials - How Do We Provide Inmates Access to the Courts? by Mark S. Cacho, Orange County Corrections Department; Urban County Issues in New Jail Planning, Design, and Transition, by Barbara Krauth with Michael O'Toole and Ray Nelson; Harris County Sheriff's Office Teams with Community College to Train Inmates, by Jim Albers, Harris County Sheriff's Office; Mission Creep and the Role of the Jail in Public Health Policy, by Donald Leach, Lexington/Fayette Urban County Government; Multnomah County Model Partnership for Custody and Health, by Timothy Moore, Multnomah County Sheriff's Office, and Gayle Burrow, Multnomah County Health Department; Strategic Planning: A 10-Step Approach, by Barry L. Stanton, Prince George's County Department of Corrections, and B. Jasmine Moultri-Fierro

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Contents of these proceedings are: meeting highlights; Report from the Bureau of Justice Statistics by Allen Beck; Discussion: PREA in Local Jails; Statistical Analysis: Crowding, Life Safety, and Managing Staff by Patrick Jablonski and Scott Bradsteet; Succession Planning: Executives and Middle Management by Gordon Bass, Dennis Williams, and Richard Geaither; Is There a Proper Place for Tasers in the Use of Force Continuum? by John Clark, William Collins, and Don Leach; Discussion: Use of Tasers; Emergency Preparedness by Rick Ferry; Legal Issues Update by Bill Collins; Discussion: Legal Issues; Topics for Next Meeting by Marilyn Chandler Ford and Richard Geaither; meeting agenda; and list of meeting attendees.

Proceedings of the Large Cover

The "concept of 'The Six Moving Parts of Correctional Employee Training,' a model for integrating strategy into the organization's approach to training" is presented (p.1). Sections of this publication are: introduction; overview of the model's components; moving part 1 -- organizational readiness; moving part 2 -- curriculum selection; moving part 3 -- delivery methodology; moving part 4 -- participant engagement; moving part 5 -- workplace reinforcement; moving part 6 -- impact evaluation; summary; and political sidebar -- why correctional training is traditionally under-resourced.

The Six Moving Parts of Correctional Training Effectiveness Cover
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