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Training in corrections

The National Institute of Corrections (NIC) is seeking applications for funding under the Fiscal Year 2021. The purpose of this project is to explore the emerging issues and trends specific to Correctional Industries programming – using as a foundation the current 40-Hour blended Correctional Industries Leadership Training curriculum and revising it into a virtual instruction-lead format.

Goals
This project aims to develop a Virtual Instructor-Led training program to provide correctional industries leadership with the knowledge and skills needed to manage industry programming while supporting inner-agency succession planning effectively.

Objectives
1. Review and revise the blended training curriculum to a virtual instructor-led format and facilitate a two-part pilot process to evaluate the effectiveness of the training curriculum based on the Instructional Theory Into Practice (ITIP) model.
2. Develop and administer a pre/post assessment to evaluate the mastery of established competencies, knowledge, and skills.
3. Explore and make recommendations for professional certification and continuing education units for the training participants.

Deliverables
1. Conduct an initial virtual meeting with NIC within ten days of the award to review goals and objectives, to discuss and develop a timeline of activities, for role clarification, for an overview of the project, and to discuss the project concept plan.
2. Provide a comprehensive work plan to include a timeline for all goals, objectives, and deliverables.
3. The awardee will research and compile a comprehensive review of the instructional material related to the existing Correctional Industries Leadership Training program.
4. The awardee is responsible for contracting and compensating any technical resource providers, presenters, etc.
5. Submission of quarterly reports to document project progress.
6. Submission of draft course materials for review by the NIC project manager.
7. Submission of a finalized participant training manual (to include a glossary of terms and knowledge checks) and an instructor's guide (to include facilitator script and teaching aids) in Word and PDF format.
8. Submission of a finalized PowerPoint training slide deck.


Questions and Answers (as of April 19, 2021)

Question 1:  Page 1, Eligibility states: "NIC invites applications from nonprofit organizations (including faith-based community and tribal organizations), for-profit organizations (including tribal for-profit organizations) and institutions of higher education (including tribal institutions of higher education). Recipients, including for profit organizations, must agree to waive any profit or fee for service.”  I am an individual, sole proprietor who would submit a proposas based on fee for service.  Am I excluded from applying for this opportunity?

Answer:  Applicants with an active Tax ID and DUNS number are eligible to apply. 

Question 2:  Page 7, Objectives states: “…facilitation of a two-part pilot process to evaluate the effectiveness of the training curriculum based on the Instructional Theory Into Practice model."  How long would he two-part pilot process be?  Is it just two classes, or two cohorts of the entire curriculum? 

Answer:   To help ensure fidelity, the goal is to complete the pilots during the award year – utilizing feedback from a core group of participants.

Question 3:  Page 7, Deliverables.  There is no deliverable for the pilot process described in the Objectives.  When reading the deliverables it appears that the final deliverables are finalized training slide deck and participant training manual.  Is there an expectation that facilitation of the two-part virtual pilot process be a deliverable?

Answer:  As written in the solicitation, facilitation of the pilot is an identified objective.


Deadline

Applicants must register with Grants.gov prior to submitting an application. NIC encourages applicants to register several weeks before the application submission deadline. In addition, NIC urges applicants to submit applications 72 hours prior to the application due date. All applications are due to be submitted and in receipt of a successful validation message in Grants.gov by 11:59 p.m. eastern time on May 24, 2021

 

The National Institute of Corrections (NIC) is seeking applications for funding under Fiscal Year 2021 for the Jail to Community Reentry Initiative. This program furthers NIC’s mission by updating NIC’s Reentry portfolio using data and emerging trends impacting successful reentry, effective interventions, and programs for justice-involved adults.

Goals
This project aims to review and develop an updated national reentry model that supports the successful transition of justice-involved adults from jails to the community.

Objectives
1. Research and develop recommendations for updates and revisions to NIC’s reentry portfolio.
2. Determine the best vehicle to disseminate the information and resources to the field.

Deliverables
1. Conduct an initial virtual meeting with the NIC Project Manager within ten days of the award to review goals and objectives, discuss and develop a timeline of activities, role clarification, overview of the project, and the project concept plan.
2. The awardee will conduct a comprehensive literature review (to include historical and emerging information specific to reentry/transition).
3. The awardee will research and develop recommendations for updates and revisions to the existing NIC reentry portfolio to include a thorough review of all information/products related to NIC’s Transition From Jails to Community (TJC) Initiative (e. g. online tool kit, reentry microsite, project bulletins/reports, readiness protocol, etc.).
4. Identify subject matter experts in collaboration with the NIC Project Manager and facilitate a key informant focus group.
5. The awardee is responsible for contracting and compensating technical resource providers (TRPs), presenters, etc., for conducting any related assistance under the cooperative agreement not performed solely by the awardee.
6. Participate in planning and quarterly meetings with the NIC Project Manager.
7. Recommendations with rationale shall be submitted in report form to NIC in Word and PDF formats. The NIC Project Manager will also consider proposals for new, innovative, and dynamic approaches to this program’s delivery method. Program delivery method proposals may be included in the report of recommendations for updates and revisions to the portfolio.
8. The awardee will co-facilitate a web-based informational session to market newly developed and/or revised reentry resources in collaboration with the designated NIC Project Manager (e. g. microsite, White Paper).
9. The awardee will meet all financial and reporting requirements for the cooperative agreement.


Questions and Answers

Question 1:
Subject matter experts:
a. How many SME's are recommended? The grant is quite low for the amount of work and we need to pay the SME's from the budget total. We were wondering if NIC had an idea in mind. Is one enough? Should it be more like 3-5?
b. Does NIC have a list of suggested experts on this topic that you are willing to share?
c. Is there a going rate for this position? We are currently working on another NIC grant and that rate is $84.50/hour. Is there a comparable rate for this project?
Answer: It is the responsibility of the applicant to recommend experts capable of completing the scope of work described in the solicitation – with rates established based on the applicant’s market research.

Question 2: Are you able to accept more than one submission per institution? Company XYZ is quite large and there may be other units also applying for this work.
Answer: Only one application can be submitted per Tax ID and/or DUNS number.

Question 3:
Deliverables:
a. It is not clear to us whether you want the awardee to deliver a list of recommendations for revision, or if we would have to do some or all of the revision as part of this grant. It seems to indicate different things in different parts of the RFP. For instance, on the goals and objectives chart it says:
Provide components and/or revisions for the interactive microsite;
b. But under the deliverables, it says only
c. 7. Recommendations with rationale shall be submitted in report form to NIC in Word and PDF formats. The NIC program manager will also consider proposals for new, innovative, and dynamic approaches to this program’s delivery method. Program delivery method proposal’s may be included in the report of recommendations for updates and revisions to the portfolio
d. We understand that there are original materials that would need updating. However, there are no links to these. Are you able to provide access to the original components/materials either as links or attachments so that we may see what the starting point is?
Answer: All information specific to the Transition From Jail to Community (TJC) Initiative can be found on NIC’s website. Per the solicitation, the awardee will submit a
written report regarding recommendations and/or next steps for the project gleaned from the focus group and document reviews.

Question 4:
I work at the Philanthropy Section, 4339DR-IRC/FEMA, Puerto Rico. As part of our service to the communities, that still recovering from hurricanes Maria and Irma in Puerto Rico, we produce a bi-weekly electronic bulletin with information on available funding, webinars and resources. I am considering adding information about the “Jail to Community Reentry Initiative” program. I would like to confirm if organizations from Puerto Rico can apply to this program. It doesn’t say -Territories- in the Eligible Applicants’ section. Please advise.
Answer: NIC is currently seeking qualified applicants to support the update of the reentry portfolio, and not applicants for a reentry program.


Deadline

Applicants must register with Grants.gov prior to submitting an application. NIC encourages applicants to register several weeks before the application submission deadline. In addition, NIC urges applicants to submit applications 72 hours prior to the application due date. All applications are due to be submitted and in receipt of a successful validation message in Grants.gov by 11:59 p.m. eastern time on May 31, 2021

 

The National Institute of Corrections' 2015 Learning and Performance Symposium activities focused on the single most important need identified by participants of the inaugural 2104 Learning and Performance Symposium - Forty Forward. During the needs assessment process of NIC’s first learning and performance symposium, practitioners said their single most important need is for innovations in training and learning delivery.

2015 Symposium activities focused on innovations in training and learning delivery included: presentations by corrections professionals representing various agencies on ways they are implementing innovations in learning and training delivery; breakout session in discipline specific groupings (prisons, jails, juvenile justice and community corrections) to discuss innovations, barriers, resources and potential solutions related to improving learning and training delivery; opportunities for professionals from local, state and federal corrections agencies in all disciplines to network and share ideas and resources related to innovations they are trying out or implementing within their agencies; [and] presentations focused on research-based strategies followed by discussions focused on different approaches to implementation.

This Proceedings Document sequentially highlights all the key content and activities of the two-and-a-half day 2015 NIC Learning and Performance Symposium attended by 138 corrections professionals from all disciplines including prisons, jails, community corrections and juvenile justice.

Content includes: Day 1 - Symposium Overview Page; Activity: Write Your Personal Motto for Learning and Performance; Activity--3 Questions - What are you looking for? Why are you at the Symposium? What will you do to get what you want?; Presentation: Strategic Thinking/ Problem Solving Training Delivery; Activity: Force Field Analysis of Training Transfer - Driving Forces vs. Restraining Forces Page; Activity: Conceptual Thinking - Build an Inter-relational Diagraph Page; Activity: Creative Thinking - Inventing & Innovating - Build and “Sell” an Innovative Training Tool; Breakout Session: Innovations, Barriers, Resources and Solutions; Activity: Set a Training Goal. Identify Barriers, Receive Peer Coaching; Day 2 - Presentation: NIC Learning Delivery Innovations; Presentations: From the Field - Learning Delivery Innovations (13 Presentations); Presentation: Training Truths - Engagement and Practice; Presentation: Virtual Response as an Engagement Tool; Activity: The Value of Practice; Guided Practice: Strategies Application; Training Design Tools; Activity: Hunting for the Good Stuff; Day 3 - Next Steps; Activity: What If?; Activity: Lead the Charge! Carry the Flag!; and Activity: Town Hall Discussion. 

2015 NIC Learning and Performance Symposium Cover

This Proceedings Document reflects all the key content and activities of the three-day 2016 NIC Learning and Performance Symposium attended by approximately 100 corrections professionals from all disciplines including prisons, jails, community corrections and juvenile justice.

2016 NIC Learning and Performance Symposium Cover

Collaboration between faith-based organizations, community organizations, and corrections has proven to be a cost-effective way to meet agency needs and bring much needed services to offenders. This unique partnership also helps to promote social justice, reduce recidivism, and increase public safety. This 3-hour program examines the myths, realities, boundaries, and benefits of this collaboration while providing information to help correctional leaders achieve new and more successful re-entry initiatives by creating service partnerships between faith-based and community organizations and corrections. Discussion topics include: leveraging money through partnerships; dispelling the myths surrounding a partnership between faith-based and community organizations and corrections; creating a solution-based partnership that helps to improves lives and fosters community safety; navigating the request for proposal (RFP) process and associated legal terms; and developing a “4th hour” action plan to integrate and expand upon the information presented.

A Model for Social Justice: Collaboration Between Faith-Based and Community Organizations and Corrections Cover

Highlights are provided of advice given by individuals from correctional agencies and faith-based and community organizations on how to create successful partnerships. Sections of this presentation are: understanding each other—questions and concerns; making partnerships work; legal issues; and getting started.

A Model for Social Justice: Collaboration Between Faith-Based and Community Organizations and Corrections: Highlights Cover

This program addresses the Americans with Disabilities Act. The ADA legislatively impacted the field of corrections when it was signed into law in 1990. Some correctional organizations have made significant progress to address this legislation, others have found themselves in costly litigation, and for others, ADA compliance needs to be addressed. Compliance is everyone's business. Panelists will provide a systemic view of the following: ADA awareness and ADA myths; fifteen-year history of the ADA in corrections; collaboration among administrators, health care, and custody staff; relationship between security and the ADA concept of "direct threat"; reasonable accommodations within a correctional setting; dialogue between stakeholders regarding ADA compliance in corrections; benefits of accessible design; and the future of ADA in corrections.

A Systemic Approach to the Americans with Disabilities Act in Corrections: Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow Cover

This 2-hour program in a town hall format was broadcast live from the American Correctional Association's Winter Conference in Phoenix, Arizona on January 10, 2005. The discussion panel includes various leaders working in and with corrections and criminal justice professionals. The intent of the broadcast is to provide education and up-to-date information on the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) to the field of corrections. Discussion topics include the following: issues of misconduct that initiated the legislation; what drove the Act through Congress; and the issue of misconduct.

A Town Hall Meeting - Addressing the Prison Rape Elimination Act  Cover

The Academy Division sponsors technical assistance, training, and networks around three major initiatives: Cognitive Behavioral Training, Learning and Performance, and Leadership Development.

Cognitive Behavioral Training (CBT) is designed to address thinking patterns and assist people in behavior change. NIC's CBT initiative is comprised of Thinking for a Change.

The Academy Leadership Development Partnership Initiative (LDPI) incorporates research, fosters innovation, and drives opportunities for professional growth by partnering with constituent agencies to plan, develop, implement, and measure agency-based leadership development programs: programs that are specific to the agency, implemented by the agency, and sustained by the agency.

The Learning and Performance Initiative represents NIC’s effort to help build staff training and development capacity in correctional agencies. Click here for resources for trainers and curriculum designers.

Division Chief: Jeff Hadnot

Crime is everyone's business. It affects entire communities. Too often, crime victims are left to fend for themselves or are forgotten, especially after the court process. Significant progress has been made in corrections-based victim services over the past two decades. Yet, true excellence in victim services can only be achieved through active collaboration.

This interactive, multidisciplinary program examines the need for a collaborative approach to corrections-based victim services. In addition, it highlights the importance of victim-centered responses by corrections, allied professionals, and the community in addressing the rights, needs, and traumas of crime victims.

Participants will: gain increased sensitivity towards crime victims and describe how crime affects people; identify and apply various methods and strategies to hold offenders accountable for the harm they have caused; identify and plan responsive strategies for corrections-based victim services in partnership with other justice and community stakeholders; develop a plan to measure victim services effectively in your jurisdiction; identify local and national resources and develop action plans for victim services collaboration; and create connections to help provide seamless services throughout corrections.

The intended outcome of this training is to empower agencies to take a leadership role in the development and delivery of victim services training to meet their specific system requirements. This training will be supplemented with resource materials that states, jurisdictions, and agencies may use in the development and management of victim services training.

Facilitator and participant manuals are also included.

Achieving Excellence in Correctional Victim Services Through Collaboration  Cover

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