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Training in corrections

“The intent of the curriculum is to provide prisons, jails, community confinement, and juvenile detention facilities with specialized training for medical and mental health personnel on specific aspects of Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA). Specifically, this curriculum provides training on how to detect and assess signs of sexual abuse, preserve physical evidence, and respond effectively and professionally to victims.

“The intended audience is health professionals. This includes but is not limited to physicians, psychologists, nurses, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, health administrators, social workers, and other professionals who provide, support, or administer health care services in correctional environments.

“The curriculum contains four modules and should take four hours to complete, including breaks and time for questions. All modules are considered essential: Facilitators guide; Introduction (10 minutes); Module 1: Detecting and Assessing Signs of Sexual Abuse and Harassment (55 minutes); Module 2: Reporting and the PREA Standards (50 minutes); Module 3: Effective and Professional Responses (30 minutes); [and] Module 4: The Medical Forensic Examination and Forensic Evidence Preservation (60 minutes).”

Specialized Training: PREA Medical and Mental Care Standards Cover

Copies of training manuals for courses provided by the California Board of State and Community Standards can be found at this website. Forms and publications include: Adult Corrections Officer – Core Manual; Adult Corrections Officer – Job Analysis Report; Adult Corrections Officer – Knowledge and Skills Maps; Adult Corrections Officer – Physical Tasks Training Manual; Annual Course – Guide to Writing Objectives for Annual Course Certification; Handbook for Core - 6th Edition; Hearing Screening Guidelines for Adult Corrections Officers; Hearing Screening Guidelines for Juvenile Corrections Officers; Juvenile Corrections Officer – Core Manual; Juvenile Corrections Officer – Job Analysis Report; Juvenile Corrections Officer – Knowledge and Skills Maps; Juvenile Corrections Officer – Physical Tasks Training Manual; Policy and Procedures for Participating Departments; Policy and Procedures for Training Providers; Probation Officer – Core Manual; Probation Officer – Job Analysis Report; Selection Exam Adult Corrections Officer Candidate Orientation Booklet; Selection Exam Juvenile Corrections Officer Candidate Orientation Booklet; Selection Exam Probation Officer Candidate Orientation Booklet; and Testing in Core Courses.

Standards and Training Cover

This 3-hour videoconference explains emergency preparedness action planning from a systemic perspective conducive to natural community partnerships. The following topics are discussed:

  • The nature of corrections-related emergencies;
  • Partners, resources, and mechanisms for stakeholder response to emergencies;
  • Elements of a written emergency plan;
  • Assessment strategies for level of alert and responses from line staff through the command level;
  • Follow-up after emergency action has been taken;
  • And emerging trends for future emergency analysis and preparation.

The DVD also includes a 1-hour locally facilitated planning session

Systemic Approaches to Emergency Preparedness Affecting Correctional Communities Cover

The National Institute of Correction's (NIC's) Service Plan for fiscal year 2010 contains opportunities available to those working in local, state, and federal corrections. Programming, information services, the NIC Learning Center, technical assistance, distance learning via satellite/Internet broadcasts, NIC training programs at the National Corrections Academy in Aurora (CO), NIC-paid training beyond Aurora (CO), and partnership programs are described.

Technical Assistance, Information, and Training for Adult Corrections: All Corrections Disciplines, Jails, Prisons, [and] Community Corrections [Service Plan: October 1, 2009 - September 30, 2010] Cover

This program is the first of a two-part webinar, and covers the physical and emotional challenges faced by correctional personnel. “The dangers correctional staff encounter on the job are well known to their leaders. A lesser known but possibly more hazardous set of factors involves the cumulative negative side effects of what staff experience through daily interactions with justice-involved individuals and immersion in uniquely challenging workplace conditions. Such side effects can be understood as examples of “Corrections Fatigue.” The webinar will describe a process model developed and modified over several years by DWCO [Desert Waters Correctional Outreach], entitled “From Corrections Fatigue to Fulfillment™.” Once Corrections Fatigue manifests, it can promote toxic adaptations to work demands, consequently undermining job performance, employee morale, health, personal and professional relationships, and employee retention.” Objectives of this webinar are: describe types of occupational stress that may negatively impact the well-being of corrections staff; present the “umbrella” term of Corrections Fatigue, its nature, properties and consequences; and present research evidence that supports a model of Corrections Fatigue and its usefulness in providing interventions regarding increasing staff well-being. This download includes copies of the video, transcript, and presentation slides.

The Corrections Profession: Maintaining Safety and Sanity, Part 1 Cover

This program is the second of a two-part webinar, and covers the physical and emotional challenges faced by correctional personnel. “The dangers correctional staff encounter on the job are well known to their leaders. A lesser known but possibly more hazardous set of factors involves the cumulative negative side effects of what staff experience through daily interactions with justice-involved individuals and immersion in uniquely challenging workplace conditions. Such side effects can be understood as examples of “Corrections Fatigue.” The webinar will describe a process model developed and modified over several years by DWCO [Desert Waters Correctional Outreach], entitled “From Corrections Fatigue to Fulfillment™.” Once Corrections Fatigue manifests, it can promote toxic adaptations to work demands, consequently undermining job performance, employee morale, health, personal and professional relationships, and employee retention.” Objectives of this webinar are: describe the concept of Corrections Fulfillment; present the basics of a data-driven, evidence-based approach to addressing Corrections Fatigue; and present corrections-specific resources to address Corrections Fatigue and promote Corrections Fulfillment.

The Corrections Profession: Maintaining Safety and Sanity, Part 2 cover

A training program for first time correctional supervisors is presented. Sections of this course are: qualities and skill building for supervisors (personal position statement and the cognitive/behavioral model); values dissonance -- personal visa and organizational context; effective communication; making decisions and creating solutions; valuing differences; encouraging performance; team building; and Supervisory Development Plan.

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The "concept of 'The Six Moving Parts of Correctional Employee Training,' a model for integrating strategy into the organization's approach to training" is presented (p.1). Sections of this publication are: introduction; overview of the model's components; moving part 1 -- organizational readiness; moving part 2 -- curriculum selection; moving part 3 -- delivery methodology; moving part 4 -- participant engagement; moving part 5 -- workplace reinforcement; moving part 6 -- impact evaluation; summary; and political sidebar -- why correctional training is traditionally under-resourced.

The Six Moving Parts of Correctional Training Effectiveness Cover

Thinking for a Change 4.0 (T4C) is an integrated cognitive behavioral change program authored by Jack Bush, Ph.D., Barry Glick, Ph.D., and Juliana Taymans, Ph.D., under a cooperative agreement with the National Institute of Corrections (NIC). T4C incorporates research from cognitive restructuring theory, social skills development, and the learning and use of problem solving skills.

T4C is comprised of 25 lessons that build upon each other, and contains appendices that can be used to craft an aftercare program to meet ongoing cognitive behavioral needs of your group. Not all lessons can be completed in one session, so a typical delivery cycle may take 30 sessions. Sessions should last between one and two hours. Ideally, the curriculum is delivered two times per week, with a minimum recommended dosage of once per week and a maximum of three times per week. Participants must be granted time to complete mandatory homework between each lesson.

The program is designed to be provided to justice-involved adults and youth, males and females. It is intended for groups of eight to twelve and should be delivered only by trained facilitators. Due to its integrated structure, T4C is a closed group, meaning members need to start at the beginning of a cycle, and may not join the group mid-stream (lesson five is a logical cut-off point for new group members).

T4C is provided by corrections professionals in prisons, jails, detention centers, community corrections, probation, and parole settings. The National Institute of Corrections has trained more than 10,000 individuals as T4C group facilitators, and more than 500 trainers who can train additional staff to facilitate the program with justice-involved clients.

T4C 4.0 represents a significant evolution in the curriculum, both in content and use. It is the most sincere hope of NIC and the authors that the changes enable you and your agency to better serve your clients. Correctional agencies can consider Thinking for a Change as one option in a continuum of interventions to address the cognitive, social, and emotional needs of their client populations’.

Thinking for a Change 4.0 Cover

The Thinking for a Change curriculum has been revised and as a result NIC is no longer making available copies of any previous versions of Thinking for a Change 3.1. 

Thinking for a Change (T4C) is the innovative, evidence-based cognitive behavioral curriculum from the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) that has broadly influenced the correctional field and the way correctional facilitators work with offenders and inmates. The program can be delivered to correctional clients by facilitators who have been trained to do so. Studies have shown that, when implemented with integrity, it can reduce recidivism among offenders. Lessons comprising this manual are: introduction; social skill-active listening; social skill—asking questions; social skill-giving feedback; social skill-knowing your feelings; cognitive self-change—thinking controls our behavior; cognitive self-change step 1—pay attention to our thinking; cognitive self-change step 2—recognizing risk; cognitive self-change step 3—use new thinking; thinking check-in; social skill—understanding the feelings of others; social skill—making a complaint; social skill—apologizing; social skill—responding to anger; social skill—negotiating; introduction to problem solving; problem solving skill 1—stop and think; problem solving skill 2—state the problem; problem solving skill 3—set a goal and gather information; problem solving practice skills 1-3; problem solving skill 4—think of choices and consequences; problem solving skill 5—make a plan; problem solving skill 6—do and evaluate; problem solving application; next steps; cognitive self-change—aftercare skill practice; social skill—aftercare skill practice; and problem solving—aftercare skill practice.

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