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Training in corrections

"This training curriculum, together with the UNODC Handbook on Women and Imprisonment, aims to assist legislators, policymakers, prison managers, staff and non-governmental organizations to acquire knowledge and skills to address the gender-specific needs of women prisoners and to explore and utilize ways to reduce their unnecessary imprisonment, in line with the provisions of the Bangkok Rules" (p. 9). The twelve modules comprising this training program are: identifying the needs of women prisoners and addressing discrimination; admission, registration, and allocation; health care; safety and security; contact with the outside world; prisoner rehabilitation; pregnant women and women with children in prison; special categories of women prisoners; preparation for release and post-release support; staff working with women prisoners; research, planning, and evaluation; and non-custodial measures. Appendixes cover: handout materials for participants; test questions and answers; training of trainers—background material; background on mental health and related issues in prisons; and End-of-Workshop Evaluation.

Training Curriculum on Women and Imprisonment, Version 1.0 cover

This program explains the systematic design of training based upon the Instructional Theory Into Practice (ITIP) model. The program was developed under a cooperative agreement with the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention for the juvenile system audience. The following modules are contained in this manual:

  • Training program overview;
  • Learner centered instruction;
  • Assessment;
  • Performance objectives;
  • ITIP model for instructional design;
  • Instructional strategies;
  • Evaluation;
  • Designing training aids;
  • Developing a training design;
  • And presenting a training design.
Training Design and Development Cover page

"The purpose of this paper is to provide learning performance professionals, curriculum designers, trainers, and others involved in the training profession an overview of the importance of analysis and evaluation when providing training to correctional professionals. The ADDIE model of instructional system design (Analyze, Design, Develop, Implement, Evaluate) is the foundation of this paper and will be covered briefly. Emphasis is placed on analysis and evaluation, as they are the bookends of the ADDIE model. No training is complete without proper analysis and evaluation" (p. 1). Sections cover: introduction and overview of the ADDIE model; how ADDIE applies to corrections; benefits and importance of analysis; needs analysis; whether there is a training problem with veteran staff; determining needs for new employees; ADDIE steps-design, develop, and implement; evaluation introduction; Kirkpatrick's Four Levels of Evaluation; common evaluation methods; evaluating Kirkpatrick Levels 1 and 2; evaluating Levels 3 and 4; immediate, intermediate, and ultimate impact; next steps and call to action.

Training from A to E Cover

Describes the training programs and technical assistance available from the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) Academy Division through an interagency partnership with the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP). Includes application instructions and forms.

Training Programs Cover

Training programs, satellite/Internet broadcasts, and e-learning are described. Information regarding training programs, information services, technical assistance, the NIC On-Line, and application procedures is also provided, along with application forms.

Training Programs for Juvenile Corrections Professionals: Overview of FY2007 Training Programs [for] June 1, 2006 - May 31, 2007 Cover

This videoconference provides Information regarding the National Institute of Corrections' transition initiative and model. The transition model assists not only offenders released to community supervision, but also releasees who have served their full sentence. Topics covered include:

  • History of transition;
  • OJP Going Home overview;
  • Key trends;
  • Transition principles;
  • Collaboration promotion;
  • What works;
  • The NIC Transition Model;
  • Examples of the NIC Transition Model;
  • Examples of pilot programs in Oregon and Missouri;
  • Bnefits and impact of the model;
  • And action motivation.
Transition from Prison to the Community Cover

“This instructional disk is intended to provide you with a comprehensive overview of Labor Market Information (LMI) and give you the informational tools to increase short-term and long-term employment outcomes for the offenders under your supervision.” Users will be able to: understand labor market information concepts and terms; identify key LMI resources and to know how to access them; use LMI to assist offenders in making career choices; use LMI to identify occupations that will experience job growth in ones state; and use LMI in the design of workforce development programs for offenders.

Using Labor Market Information to Promote Positive Employment Outcomes for Offenders Cover

This program on justice-involved veterans, highlights the lifesaving role being played by veterans treatment courts (VTCs) across the country.

From WWII through the continuing global war on terror, there are approximately 21.5 million veterans in the U.S. today. So many of these men, and increasingly women, return home damaged mentally and physically from their time in service. These wounds often contribute to their involvement in the criminal justice system. As a result, veterans are overrepresented in our jails and prisons.

For these justice-involved vets, Veterans Treatment Courts are providing a pathway to recovery so that they can be restored to functioning and contributing members of society.

Veterans Treatment Courts, or VTCs, provide hope, restore families and save lives. The first VTC, founded in 2008 in Buffalo, New York, has inspired the creation of more than 220 courts of similar nature in jurisdictions, both large and small, across the country. Hundreds more are in various stages of planning and implementation.

These courts have the support of the communities they serve, as well as the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and local service providing agencies. Critical to the success of VTCs are veterans who volunteer to be trained and serve as mentors to justice-involved veterans.

This training program will: Introduce Veterans Treatment Courts as an effective intervention and an alternative to incarceration for justice-involved veterans; Identify the unique issues which contribute to veterans’ involvement in the criminal justice system at the local, state and federal levels; Highlight the inception of Veterans Treatment Courts and the role they play in improving public safety, reducing recidivism, saving taxpayer dollars and, most importantly, restoring the lives of those who have served our country; Showcase model Veterans Treatment Court Programs, including Veterans Peer Mentor Programs; Demonstrate how to implement and sustain an effective VTC, including the vital role of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and Veteran Peer Mentors; and Provide resources and next steps for jurisdictions interested in implementing a Veterans Treatment Court or looking to improve an existing program.

Veterans Treatment Courts cover

This program on justice-involved veterans, highlights the lifesaving role being played by veterans treatment courts (VTCs) across the country.

From WWII through the continuing global war on terror, there are approximately 21.5 million veterans in the U.S. today. So many of these men, and increasingly women, return home damaged mentally and physically from their time in service. These wounds often contribute to their involvement in the criminal justice system. As a result, veterans are overrepresented in our jails and prisons.

For these justice-involved vets, Veterans Treatment Courts are providing a pathway to recovery so that they can be restored to functioning and contributing members of society.

Veterans Treatment Courts, or VTCs, provide hope, restore families and save lives. The first VTC, founded in 2008 in Buffalo, New York, has inspired the creation of more than 220 courts of similar nature in jurisdictions, both large and small, across the country. Hundreds more are in various stages of planning and implementation.

These courts have the support of the communities they serve, as well as the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and local service providing agencies. Critical to the success of VTCs are veterans who volunteer to be trained and serve as mentors to justice-involved veterans.

This training program will: Introduce Veterans Treatment Courts as an effective intervention and an alternative to incarceration for justice-involved veterans; Identify the unique issues which contribute to veterans’ involvement in the criminal justice system at the local, state and federal levels; Highlight the inception of Veterans Treatment Courts and the role they play in improving public safety, reducing recidivism, saving taxpayer dollars and, most importantly, restoring the lives of those who have served our country; Showcase model Veterans Treatment Court Programs, including Veterans Peer Mentor Programs; Demonstrate how to implement and sustain an effective VTC, including the vital role of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and Veteran Peer Mentors; and Provide resources and next steps for jurisdictions interested in implementing a Veterans Treatment Court or looking to improve an existing program.

Veterans Treatment Courts cover

This program on justice-involved veterans, highlights the lifesaving role being played by veterans treatment courts (VTCs) across the country.

From WWII through the continuing global war on terror, there are approximately 21.5 million veterans in the U.S. today. So many of these men, and increasingly women, return home damaged mentally and physically from their time in service. These wounds often contribute to their involvement in the criminal justice system. As a result, veterans are overrepresented in our jails and prisons.

For these justice-involved vets, Veterans Treatment Courts are providing a pathway to recovery so that they can be restored to functioning and contributing members of society.

Veterans Treatment Courts, or VTCs, provide hope, restore families and save lives. The first VTC, founded in 2008 in Buffalo, New York, has inspired the creation of more than 220 courts of similar nature in jurisdictions, both large and small, across the country. Hundreds more are in various stages of planning and implementation.

These courts have the support of the communities they serve, as well as the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and local service providing agencies. Critical to the success of VTCs are veterans who volunteer to be trained and serve as mentors to justice-involved veterans.

This training program will: Introduce Veterans Treatment Courts as an effective intervention and an alternative to incarceration for justice-involved veterans; Identify the unique issues which contribute to veterans’ involvement in the criminal justice system at the local, state and federal levels; Highlight the inception of Veterans Treatment Courts and the role they play in improving public safety, reducing recidivism, saving taxpayer dollars and, most importantly, restoring the lives of those who have served our country; Showcase model Veterans Treatment Court Programs, including Veterans Peer Mentor Programs; Demonstrate how to implement and sustain an effective VTC, including the vital role of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and Veteran Peer Mentors; and Provide resources and next steps for jurisdictions interested in implementing a Veterans Treatment Court or looking to improve an existing program.

Veterans Treatment Courts cover

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