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Training in corrections

This program seeks to increase environmental awareness among corrections professionals and focuses attention on the need to make correctional facilities more energy and resource efficient. This broadcast:

  • Explores the feasibility of introducing green collar job readiness training programs
  • Assesses correctional industries capability to adopt “green” practices
  • And identifies strategies to assess cost saving options for correctional agencies to operate “self sustaining” facilities and programs.
Greening Corrections: People, Programs, and Practices [Satellite/Internet Broadcast held July 14, 2010] Cover

Data continues to show that women are entering the justice system at rates exceeding male offenders and bring with them extremely complex and multi-layered behavioral and physical health issues. While systems must make choices on how best to deploy limited staffing and programming resources, this broadcast series is an opportunity to explore methods of coordination between behavioral and physical health care. This broadcast is the 2nd offering in a two part series addressing health related issues with women in our nation’s justice systems. On August 15, 2012 the first in the two-part series “Health, Justice and Women: Transforming Systems—Changing Lives” was aired and explored research, strategies and resources designed to effect health care practices with justice-involved women.

This broadcast “Health, Justice, Women: Behavioral Health and Ob/Gyn,” held on February 20, 2013, will take a closer look at areas introduced in the first broadcast with a focus specifically on the complexities of behavioral, obstetrical and gynecological issue that impact all women in our justice systems. Through short lecture, slides, video, interviews, practical vignettes and introduction of a broad array of resources, we will address behavioral health issues and initiate discussion around ob/gyn issues that impact women through their lifespan but that often create broad challenges to our agencies. As part of those discussions, we will spend some time on reproductive health issues to include pre and post-partum issues as well as the use of restraints during pregnancy.

During this discussion, participants will: Explore how research from the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) study, the National Prevention Strategy (NPS), and others can inform correctional health practices for justice-involved women; Explore models in correctional settings of evidence-based behavioral and women’s health services; Identify how professional health care organizations continue to contribute to correctional health care for women; and Initiate agency-based conversations regarding creation of and/or enhancement of health care practices for women. Also included are the PowerPoint slides from the presentation and the Participant Guide.

Health, Justice, Women: Behavioral Health and OB/GYN [Internet Broadcast] Cover

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the most common blood-borne infection in the United States, with approximately three million persons living with current infection. Of the two million individuals incarcerated in US federal and state prisons, a February 2015 Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) special report states that 9.8% of these individuals have Hepatitis C. With the advent of a one pill per day treatment regimen, the management of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) in corrections is rapidly evolving.

“Correctional health is a key to public health.” – (Retired) Vice Admiral Richard H. Carmona, M.D., M.P.H., FACS, United States Surgeon General.

This internet broadcast from the National Institute of Correction (NIC) covers the newest innovations in treatment practices, protocols, and management of HCV and its implications for criminal justice, corrections organizations and public health.

Topics discussed include the current prevalence of Hepatitis C in the general public in comparison to the correctional population, highlighting the importance of treating pervasive co-occurring substance use disorders. As one of the first lines of defense in public health, correctional agencies have a critical opportunity to screen, diagnose, and treat.

We will identify several correctional systems throughout the country which are effectively managing their HCV infected population, focusing on successes and challenges of management. Presenters will also share recommendations and resources for jurisdictions looking to implement and improve upon existing programs.

This broadcast will answer the following questions: What is the scope of HCV as an issue, while comparing and contrasting HCV prevalence in the general and corrections populations ; What is HCV?, How is it transmitted?, What is the current prevalence?, and What are current treatment options and related costs?; What are the policies, protocols and procedures implemented by agencies that are effectively managing HCV?; How can agencies improve the coordination of care and services for offenders upon release?; How can we proactively address current and future challenges such as developing and implementing consistent screening and treatment protocols; data collection; pharmaceutical cost management; and collaboration with local, state and federal partners?; and What are recommended resources and next steps for jurisdictions interested in implementing or improving an existing HCV program?

Hepatitis C in Corrections cover

Issues surrounding stress in a correctional setting, like the effects, sources, and symptoms of stress, burnout, and coping strategies, are covered during this 6.5 hour course. Participants will be able to: define stress and identify the effects of stress; identify the sources of stress; identify the physical and behavioral symptoms of stress; define burnout and identify the stages of burnout; identify positive and negative coping strategies; summarize the key components of “My Pyramid”; recognize how thoughts, feelings, and attitudes lead to predictable patterns of behavior; practice “objective detachment” in observing and describing thoughts, feelings, and attitudes; and practice identifying stress-mitigating responses to work-related situations. Also included is the PowerPoint presentation, video vignettes, and participant handouts.

Dealing with Stress in Corrections [Lesson Plans and Participant's Manual] Cover

This is a 24-hour training covering the national Prison Rape Elimination Act Standards and implications for responding to the different needs of men, women and LGBTI inmates who are sexually abused in custody.

Following are the goals of the training.

  1. Review the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) standards and identify their impact on administrative investigations and human resources.
  2. Identify components of investigative and human resource policies and procedures as they relate to sexual abuse of persons in custody.
  3. Understand the legal and investigative implications of and strategies for responding.
  4. Intended audience (similar to what we have done for webinars—please provide a list of who is best suited to receive the training)

The audience for this particular training is high-level correctional administrators in leadership positions who have the ability to initiate intra-agency change. Likely trainees include deputy commissioners, lead human resources personnel, general counsel, lead administrative investigators, PREA coordinators, PREA compliance managers, jail administrators, and division directors.

Human Resources and Administrative Investigations Employee Training Cover

This presentation is an extended interview with Dr. William Miller regarding the utilization of motivational interviewing (MI) in correctional settings. Topics discussed include:

  • Background of MI
  • MI in corrections
  • How MI works
  • The spirit of MI
  • Implementing MI
  • MI applications and assessment
  • Brief and one-time MI
  • Essentials of MI
  • MI roll-out and training
  • The supervisor’s role
  • MI research
  • And implications for policy makers, supervisors and MI coaches.

The resources contained on the CD-ROM are transcripts of the video presentation and a copy of "Motivating Offenders to Change."

Implementing Motivational Interviewing in Correctional Settings: An Interview with Dr. William Miller Cover

The Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) directs the Department of Justice to provide grants to jurisdictions and agencies nationwide to “protect inmates (particularly from prison rape) and to safeguard the communities to which inmates return.” 34 USC § 30305(a).
Through this program, BJA is seeking applications for funding of projects designed to prevent, detect, and respond to sexual abuse and sexual harassment in confinement facilities, and to achieve and maintain compliance with the PREA standards.

Goals and Objectives
The purpose of the PREA Grant Program is to assist confinement facilities and the agencies that oversee them in preventing, identifying, and responding to sexual abuse and sexual harassment in these facilities, and to support compliance with the PREA standards.

BJA anticipates making up to 18 awards of up to $250,000 each.

For more information and to download the full solicitation, please vist the BJA website: here

DEADLINE: The FY 2020 solicitation is, and will remain open through April 14, 2020.

 

This program focuses on presenting new reentry strategies and highlight specific programs around the country that reflect best practices. Imagine a reentry program that reduces recidivism, changes lives, and makes prisons and jails safer with little or no cost to taxpayers. Such a program has been around for decades. It is correctional industries, an effective model for preparing offenders for employment upon release. The elements of this strategy include skills certification, positive change, collaboration with businesses and the community, and a focus on career development and job retention. Participants in this broadcast will be able to identify: the growing role of correctional industries in the reentry process; best practices in innovative correctional industries related to successful reentry; strategies for promoting collaborations that increase the effectiveness of correctional industries on reentry; positive reentry outcomes resulting from correctional industries; and the future of correctional industries.

This program is Part 2 in a series on correctional industries; Part 1, Building Tomorrow's Workforce: An Effective Reentry Strategy (#023255), focuses on the history and benefits of correctional industries and ways to balance competing interests. Part 3, Correctional Industries: A Working Solution (#025293), explores how Correctional Industries make a significant difference in the lives of the offender population through testimony from national experts, correctional practitioners, and former offenders.

Innovative Reentry Strategies: The Emerging Role of Correctional Industries Cover

This basic communication skills training program, developed by Robert R. Carkhuff, has been used by correctional agencies for more than thirty-five years to train officers and counselors. Sessions contained in this course are: introduction to the IPC (interpersonal communication) model; the basics -- sizing up the situation; positioning; posturing; observing; listening; summary of the basics; the add-ons -- communicating to inmates; responding to inmates -- identifying content; responding to inmates -- identifying feeling; responding to inmates -- identifying meaning; asking questions; summary of the add-ons; the applications -- managing behavior; handling requests; making requests; reinforcing behavior; summary of the applications; and conclusion. The CD contains the instructor guide, participant manual, and the competency test and answer key. The DVD includes narrative introductions to the skill being discussed and dramatized scenes that show the lack or use of the skill being covered.

Interpersonal Communications in the Correctional Setting: IPC Cover

A curriculum to address the needs of those who investigate allegations of staff sexual misconduct is presented. The following sections are contained in this manual: defining staff sexual misconduct and an overview of the national scope; legal considerations; institutional culture and staff/inmate dynamics; proactive investigative framework; responding to allegations; and activity booklet and action planning.

Training Curriculum for Investigating Allegations of Staff Sexual Misconduct with Inmates [Lesson Plans] Cover

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