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Training in corrections

Are you interested in getting more bang for your training buck? Leveraging the impact of your training department? Being effective with the training you prepare for, design, deliver and transfer into the workplace? Following the science of learning into practice? And you know that "content covered is not content learned?" Then this blended, interactive training broadcast / experience can assist with a transformation of your training department / unit into a center of learning and performance that can directly impact employee on-the-job performance. During this national training program sponsored and broadcast by the National Institute of Corrections on January 16 and 17, 2013, facilitators will: Identify the role of the agency leadership, agency supervisor, trainer and learner in preparation for training and the influence that role has on performance; Explore the research regarding the management of content and its impact on learning and performance; Explore the importance of providing learners the opportunity to practice new skills and knowledge and the effect that has on performance; and Discover the connections between performance expectations, evaluation and transfer of learning and how they affect the learner. Also included are the Facilitator Manual, Participant Guide, and PowerPoint slides from the two-day presentation.

From Research to Application: The Case for Learning and Performance Cover

The government deploys thousands of valuable corrections employees to serve the country each year. Thus, it is in the best interest of correctional agencies to be proactive in establishing programs that ease the process of deployment and the employees’ return to work.

This 3-hour program, broadcast on May 13, 2009, addresses strategies to help manage the effect of these deployments on an organization by accessing existing programs and resources. Participants will be able to: raise awareness of how military service members’ deployment and subsequent return to work affect your agency; address operational issues unique to the correctional setting; recognize why retaining and recruiting military service members makes good business sense; identify successful strategies and promising practices; and increase awareness of existing resources and programs for your military service employees.

From the Battlefront to the Homefront: Welcoming Employees Back to Work Cover

This is a 2-hour forum on gang-related criminal activity in the community and within the correctional environment. Program objectives are to help viewers: identify gangs and deviant groups; create strategies for interagency collaboration; implement strategies for identification and management of gangs; and understand the impact of gangs on the community. 

The first half of the program focuses on problems related to gangs in the community. Points addressed include identifying gangs and deviant groups, myths vs. reality of gangs, trends and future implications, and gang management - what works in the community. 

The second half of the program deals with topics concerning gangs in institutions, such as agency collaboration, identifying and monitoring gangs, gang management in jails and prisons, and trends and future implications, and gang management - what works in the community.

Text includes various papers, text for overheads, and gang quizzes. 

Gangs, Community and Corrections  Cover

This program seeks to increase environmental awareness among corrections professionals and focuses attention on the need to make correctional facilities more energy and resource efficient. This broadcast:

  • Explores the feasibility of introducing green collar job readiness training programs
  • Assesses correctional industries capability to adopt “green” practices
  • And identifies strategies to assess cost saving options for correctional agencies to operate “self sustaining” facilities and programs.
Greening Corrections: People, Programs, and Practices [Satellite/Internet Broadcast held July 14, 2010] Cover

Data continues to show that women are entering the justice system at rates exceeding male offenders and bring with them extremely complex and multi-layered behavioral and physical health issues. While systems must make choices on how best to deploy limited staffing and programming resources, this broadcast series is an opportunity to explore methods of coordination between behavioral and physical health care. This broadcast is the 2nd offering in a two part series addressing health related issues with women in our nation’s justice systems. On August 15, 2012 the first in the two-part series “Health, Justice and Women: Transforming Systems—Changing Lives” was aired and explored research, strategies and resources designed to effect health care practices with justice-involved women.

This broadcast “Health, Justice, Women: Behavioral Health and Ob/Gyn,” held on February 20, 2013, will take a closer look at areas introduced in the first broadcast with a focus specifically on the complexities of behavioral, obstetrical and gynecological issue that impact all women in our justice systems. Through short lecture, slides, video, interviews, practical vignettes and introduction of a broad array of resources, we will address behavioral health issues and initiate discussion around ob/gyn issues that impact women through their lifespan but that often create broad challenges to our agencies. As part of those discussions, we will spend some time on reproductive health issues to include pre and post-partum issues as well as the use of restraints during pregnancy.

During this discussion, participants will: Explore how research from the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) study, the National Prevention Strategy (NPS), and others can inform correctional health practices for justice-involved women; Explore models in correctional settings of evidence-based behavioral and women’s health services; Identify how professional health care organizations continue to contribute to correctional health care for women; and Initiate agency-based conversations regarding creation of and/or enhancement of health care practices for women. Also included are the PowerPoint slides from the presentation and the Participant Guide.

Health, Justice, Women: Behavioral Health and OB/GYN [Internet Broadcast] Cover
Health, Justice, Women: Behavioral Health and OB/GYN - Part 1 [Internet Broadcast]

Data continues to show that women are entering the justice system at rates exceeding male offenders and bring with them extremely complex and multi-layered behavioral and physical health issues. While systems must make choices on how best to deploy limited staffing and programming resources, this broadcast series is an opportunity to explore methods of coordination between behavioral and physical health care. This broadcast is the 2nd offering in a two part series addressing health related issues with women in our nation’s justice systems. On August 15, 2012 the first in the two-part series “Health, Justice and Women: Transforming Systems—Changing Lives” was aired and explored research, strategies and resources designed to effect health care practices with justice-involved women.

This broadcast “Health, Justice, Women: Behavioral Health and Ob/Gyn,” held on February 20, 2013, will take a closer look at areas introduced in the first broadcast with a focus specifically on the complexities of behavioral, obstetrical and gynecological issue that impact all women in our justice systems. Through short lecture, slides, video, interviews, practical vignettes and introduction of a broad array of resources, we will address behavioral health issues and initiate discussion around ob/gyn issues that impact women through their lifespan but that often create broad challenges to our agencies. As part of those discussions, we will spend some time on reproductive health issues to include pre and post-partum issues as well as the use of restraints during pregnancy.

During this discussion, participants will: Explore how research from the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) study, the National Prevention Strategy (NPS), and others can inform correctional health practices for justice-involved women; Explore models in correctional settings of evidence-based behavioral and women’s health services; Identify how professional health care organizations continue to contribute to correctional health care for women; and Initiate agency-based conversations regarding creation of and/or enhancement of health care practices for women. Also included are the PowerPoint slides from the presentation and the Participant Guide.

Health, Justice, Women: Behavioral Health and OB/GYN [Internet Broadcast] Cover
Health, Justice, Women: Behavioral Health and OB/GYN - Part 2 [Internet Broadcast]

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the most common blood-borne infection in the United States, with approximately three million persons living with current infection. Of the two million individuals incarcerated in US federal and state prisons, a February 2015 Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) special report states that 9.8% of these individuals have Hepatitis C. With the advent of a one pill per day treatment regimen, the management of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) in corrections is rapidly evolving.

“Correctional health is a key to public health.” – (Retired) Vice Admiral Richard H. Carmona, M.D., M.P.H., FACS, United States Surgeon General.

This internet broadcast from the National Institute of Correction (NIC) covers the newest innovations in treatment practices, protocols, and management of HCV and its implications for criminal justice, corrections organizations and public health.

Topics discussed include the current prevalence of Hepatitis C in the general public in comparison to the correctional population, highlighting the importance of treating pervasive co-occurring substance use disorders. As one of the first lines of defense in public health, correctional agencies have a critical opportunity to screen, diagnose, and treat.

We will identify several correctional systems throughout the country which are effectively managing their HCV infected population, focusing on successes and challenges of management. Presenters will also share recommendations and resources for jurisdictions looking to implement and improve upon existing programs.

This broadcast will answer the following questions: What is the scope of HCV as an issue, while comparing and contrasting HCV prevalence in the general and corrections populations ; What is HCV?, How is it transmitted?, What is the current prevalence?, and What are current treatment options and related costs?; What are the policies, protocols and procedures implemented by agencies that are effectively managing HCV?; How can agencies improve the coordination of care and services for offenders upon release?; How can we proactively address current and future challenges such as developing and implementing consistent screening and treatment protocols; data collection; pharmaceutical cost management; and collaboration with local, state and federal partners?; and What are recommended resources and next steps for jurisdictions interested in implementing or improving an existing HCV program?

Hepatitis C in Corrections cover
Hepatitis C in Corrections: Innovations in Treatment and Management of a Public Health Challenge - Part 1 [Internet Broadcast]

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the most common blood-borne infection in the United States, with approximately three million persons living with current infection. Of the two million individuals incarcerated in US federal and state prisons, a February 2015 Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) special report states that 9.8% of these individuals have Hepatitis C. With the advent of a one pill per day treatment regimen, the management of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) in corrections is rapidly evolving.

“Correctional health is a key to public health.” – (Retired) Vice Admiral Richard H. Carmona, M.D., M.P.H., FACS, United States Surgeon General.

This internet broadcast from the National Institute of Correction (NIC) covers the newest innovations in treatment practices, protocols, and management of HCV and its implications for criminal justice, corrections organizations and public health.

Topics discussed include the current prevalence of Hepatitis C in the general public in comparison to the correctional population, highlighting the importance of treating pervasive co-occurring substance use disorders. As one of the first lines of defense in public health, correctional agencies have a critical opportunity to screen, diagnose, and treat.

We will identify several correctional systems throughout the country which are effectively managing their HCV infected population, focusing on successes and challenges of management. Presenters will also share recommendations and resources for jurisdictions looking to implement and improve upon existing programs.

This broadcast will answer the following questions: What is the scope of HCV as an issue, while comparing and contrasting HCV prevalence in the general and corrections populations ; What is HCV?, How is it transmitted?, What is the current prevalence?, and What are current treatment options and related costs?; What are the policies, protocols and procedures implemented by agencies that are effectively managing HCV?; How can agencies improve the coordination of care and services for offenders upon release?; How can we proactively address current and future challenges such as developing and implementing consistent screening and treatment protocols; data collection; pharmaceutical cost management; and collaboration with local, state and federal partners?; and What are recommended resources and next steps for jurisdictions interested in implementing or improving an existing HCV program?

Hepatitis C in Corrections cover
Hepatitis C in Corrections: Innovations in Treatment and Management of a Public Health Challenge - Part 2 [Internet Broadcast]

Issues surrounding stress in a correctional setting, like the effects, sources, and symptoms of stress, burnout, and coping strategies, are covered during this 6.5 hour course. Participants will be able to: define stress and identify the effects of stress; identify the sources of stress; identify the physical and behavioral symptoms of stress; define burnout and identify the stages of burnout; identify positive and negative coping strategies; summarize the key components of “My Pyramid”; recognize how thoughts, feelings, and attitudes lead to predictable patterns of behavior; practice “objective detachment” in observing and describing thoughts, feelings, and attitudes; and practice identifying stress-mitigating responses to work-related situations. Also included is the PowerPoint presentation, video vignettes, and participant handouts.

Dealing with Stress in Corrections [Lesson Plans and Participant's Manual] Cover

This is a 24-hour training covering the national Prison Rape Elimination Act Standards and implications for responding to the different needs of men, women and LGBTI inmates who are sexually abused in custody.

Following are the goals of the training.

  1. Review the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) standards and identify their impact on administrative investigations and human resources.
  2. Identify components of investigative and human resource policies and procedures as they relate to sexual abuse of persons in custody.
  3. Understand the legal and investigative implications of and strategies for responding.
  4. Intended audience (similar to what we have done for webinars—please provide a list of who is best suited to receive the training)

The audience for this particular training is high-level correctional administrators in leadership positions who have the ability to initiate intra-agency change. Likely trainees include deputy commissioners, lead human resources personnel, general counsel, lead administrative investigators, PREA coordinators, PREA compliance managers, jail administrators, and division directors.

Human Resources and Administrative Investigations Employee Training Cover

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