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The National Institute of Corrections' 2015 Learning and Performance Symposium activities focused on the single most important need identified by participants of the inaugural 2104 Learning and Performance Symposium - Forty Forward. During the needs assessment process of NIC’s first learning and performance symposium, practitioners said their single most important need is for innovations in training and learning delivery.

2015 Symposium activities focused on innovations in training and learning delivery included: presentations by corrections professionals representing various agencies on ways they are implementing innovations in learning and training delivery; breakout session in discipline specific groupings (prisons, jails, juvenile justice and community corrections) to discuss innovations, barriers, resources and potential solutions related to improving learning and training delivery; opportunities for professionals from local, state and federal corrections agencies in all disciplines to network and share ideas and resources related to innovations they are trying out or implementing within their agencies; [and] presentations focused on research-based strategies followed by discussions focused on different approaches to implementation.

This Proceedings Document sequentially highlights all the key content and activities of the two-and-a-half day 2015 NIC Learning and Performance Symposium attended by 138 corrections professionals from all disciplines including prisons, jails, community corrections and juvenile justice.

Content includes: Day 1 - Symposium Overview Page; Activity: Write Your Personal Motto for Learning and Performance; Activity--3 Questions - What are you looking for? Why are you at the Symposium? What will you do to get what you want?; Presentation: Strategic Thinking/ Problem Solving Training Delivery; Activity: Force Field Analysis of Training Transfer - Driving Forces vs. Restraining Forces Page; Activity: Conceptual Thinking - Build an Inter-relational Diagraph Page; Activity: Creative Thinking - Inventing & Innovating - Build and “Sell” an Innovative Training Tool; Breakout Session: Innovations, Barriers, Resources and Solutions; Activity: Set a Training Goal. Identify Barriers, Receive Peer Coaching; Day 2 - Presentation: NIC Learning Delivery Innovations; Presentations: From the Field - Learning Delivery Innovations (13 Presentations); Presentation: Training Truths - Engagement and Practice; Presentation: Virtual Response as an Engagement Tool; Activity: The Value of Practice; Guided Practice: Strategies Application; Training Design Tools; Activity: Hunting for the Good Stuff; Day 3 - Next Steps; Activity: What If?; Activity: Lead the Charge! Carry the Flag!; and Activity: Town Hall Discussion. 

2015 NIC Learning and Performance Symposium Cover

This Proceedings Document reflects all the key content and activities of the three-day 2016 NIC Learning and Performance Symposium attended by approximately 100 corrections professionals from all disciplines including prisons, jails, community corrections and juvenile justice.

2016 NIC Learning and Performance Symposium Cover

This user-friendly tool kit is: grounded in research; follows and promotes the use of the ADDIE (Analyze, Design, Develop, Implement, and Evaluate) model and ITIP (Instructional Theory Into Practice) format; and provides “a mechanism for the user to work with curriculum designers to set expectations, then to review, evaluate and give feedback on the curriculum as it is being developed” (p. ii). This publication is divided into six parts: purpose of the tool kit and its components; ADDIE Instructional Design System; ITIP; thirteen tools; frequently asked questions (FAQs); and resources.

I.T.I.P Toolkit Cover image

"The purpose of this paper is to provide learning performance professionals, curriculum designers, trainers, and others involved in the training profession an overview of the importance of analysis and evaluation when providing training to correctional professionals. The ADDIE model of instructional system design (Analyze, Design, Develop, Implement, Evaluate) is the foundation of this paper and will be covered briefly. Emphasis is placed on analysis and evaluation, as they are the bookends of the ADDIE model. No training is complete without proper analysis and evaluation" (p. 1). Sections cover: introduction and overview of the ADDIE model; how ADDIE applies to corrections; benefits and importance of analysis; needs analysis; whether there is a training problem with veteran staff; determining needs for new employees; ADDIE steps-design, develop, and implement; evaluation introduction; Kirkpatrick's Four Levels of Evaluation; common evaluation methods; evaluating Kirkpatrick Levels 1 and 2; evaluating Levels 3 and 4; immediate, intermediate, and ultimate impact; next steps and call to action.

Training from A to E Cover

The use of workplace learning in “building your organization into a dynamic and flexible one, capable of meeting contemporary challenges” is addressed (p. 2). These annotated citations are grouped according to what workplace learning is, its importance, how to implement it, and how workplace learning has been implemented.

Workplace Learning Annotated Bibliography Cover

This is a three webinar series. Each webinar builds into the next!

Are you converting your instructor led training (a.k.a. face-to-face or in-person training) to live virtual instructor led training (VILT)? Do you know where to start to convert face-to-face training and materials, such as your facilitator guides, participant guides, slide shows, and other learning experience materials?

What We Will Do in the Webinar Series?

  1. Explore popular virtual platforms, compare and contrast them to your unique agency needs / outcomes for virtual learning.
  2. Assess agency technology infrastructure as well as learner, trainer, and agency readiness for virtual learning.
  3. Survey best practices to determine the duration of virtual learning based upon training outcomes.
  4. Apply options for participant engagement, interaction, and collaboration during virtual learning.
  5. Share experiences from other correctional agencies with respect to in-person to virtual conversions.

Part 1:
In this webinar, participants used the ADDIE framework (Assessment, Design, Development, Implementation and Evaluation) as a virtual roadmap to:

  • Compare and contrast the characteristics of popular virtual training platforms;
  • Assess agency technology infrastructure versus what is needed for effective live virtual training delivery;
  • Assess learner, trainer, and agency readiness for virtual learning; and
  • Determine initial steps for conversion of training from in person (instructor led training / ILT) to virtual instructor led (VILT).

 

Facilitators

  • Jeff Hadnot, Chief, NIC Academy Division
  • Ashley Kerr, Training Officer, Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction
  • Elizabeth Kreger, Assistant Director of Adult Options, Ohio Department of Education
  • Leslie LeMaster, Correctional Program Specialist, NIC Academy Division
  • Jim Wiseman, Director of Training (retired), Missouri Department of Corrections
Where Do I Start? Using ADDIE as a Roadmap for Conversion (1 of 3) [Webinar]

This is a three webinar series. Each webinar builds into the next!

Are you converting your instructor led training (a.k.a. face-to-face or in-person training) to live virtual instructor led training (VILT)? Do you know where to start to convert face-to-face training and materials, such as your facilitator guides, participant guides, slide shows, and other learning experience materials?

What We Will Do in the Webinar Series?

  1. Explore popular virtual platforms, compare and contrast them to your unique agency needs / outcomes for virtual learning.
  2. Assess agency technology infrastructure as well as learner, trainer, and agency readiness for virtual learning.
  3. Survey best practices to determine the duration of virtual learning based upon training outcomes.
  4. Apply options for participant engagement, interaction, and collaboration during virtual learning.
  5. Share experiences from other correctional agencies with respect to in-person to virtual conversions.

If you are interested in the answers to these questions and more, then watch this webinar series!

Part 2:

In the second webinar of this series, participants use the ADDIE road map to guide steps needed to analyze, design, develop, implement and evaluate the instructor led training (ILT) to virtual instructor led training (VILT) conversion process. Best practices for converting from ILT to VILT are detailed including analyzing status of curriculum you are converting to virtual, is it a one to one hour ratio from in person to live virtual delivery hours, virtual digital live and off-live activities, and determining session duration and number of live virtual sessions. The webinar includes three agency conversion stories, focused on the steps to converting from in person to virtual training.

Experiences are shared from
1) Ohio Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation's (ODRC) New Employee Orientation (NEO) training,
2) NIC's Correctional Leadership Development (CLD) training, and
3) NIC's Thinking for a Change (T4C) Facilitator training.

Facilitators

  • Jeff Hadnot, Chief, NIC Academy Division
  • Ashley Kerr, Training Officer, Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction
  • Elizabeth Kreger, Assistant Director of Adult Options, Ohio Department of Education
  • Leslie LeMaster, Correctional Program Specialist, NIC Academy Division
  • Jim Wiseman, Director of Training (retired), Missouri Department of Corrections
What’s Next? How Do I Convert ILT to VILT? The Basics - Part Two [Webinar]
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