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Vocational education

This report describes the “development of a correctional education reentry model illustrating an education continuum to bridge the gap between prison and community-based education and training programs. The goal of this model is to en­sure that offenders can gain the knowledge and skills needed to obtain long-term, living-wage employment, and transition successfully out of the corrections sys­tem. It is based on a review of research studies and feedback from a panel of ex­perts, including practitioners, administrators, and researchers in the fields of corrections and education” (p. 3). The reentry solution of an education continuum section covers: the model—strengthening and aligning education services, establishing a strong program infrastructure, and ensuring education is well integrated in the corrections system; and applying and validating the model.

A Reentry Education Model: Supporting Education and Career Advancement for Low-Skill Individuals In Corrections Cover

"Incarcerated individuals are disproportionately people of color as well as adults with low educational attainment. More than 650,000 ex-offenders are released from prison each year and recent research shows that two-thirds of those prisoners will be rearrested within three years of release. However, research also shows that access to correctional education can significantly reduce recidivism … it’s essential to invest in robust education and training opportunities for incarcerated people and to connect them to continued education and employment opportunities once they rejoin society. Providing these opportunities is cost-effective for states and has significant community and economic benefits. For individuals and families, coupling education and employment with reduced collateral and systemic barriers leads to economic self-sufficiency and improved life outcomes. CLASP’s forum examines promising policy options as well as lessons from state and federal initiatives." In addition to the forum video, agenda, and speaker biographies, this webpage provides access to the report "From Incarceration to Reentry: A Look at Trends, Gaps, and Opportunities in Correctional Education and Training" by Wayne Taliaferro, Duy Pham, and Anna Cielinski.

Reconnecting Justice Cover

“Failure to become employed after release is a major factor contributing to the high rate of recidivism. Having a record of arrest, conviction or imprisonment functions as a significant barrier to employment since employers generally view ex-offenders as potentially untrustworthy workers and insurance companies usually designate ex-offenders as being “not bondable” for job honesty … The bonds issued by the FBP [Federal Bonding Program] serve as a job placement tool by guaranteeing to the employer the job honesty of at-risk job seekers. Employers receive the bonds free-of-charge as an incentive to hire hard-to-place job applicants as wage earners. The FBP bond insurance was designed to reimburse the employer for any loss due to employee theft of money or property with no deductible amount to become the employer’s liability (i.e., 100% bond insurance coverage). The USDOL [U.S. Department of Labor] experiment has proved to be a great success, with over 42,000 job placements made for at-risk job seekers who were automatically made bondable. Since approximately 460 proved to be dishonest workers, bonding services as a job placement tool can be considered to have a 99% success rate.” Information is provided for: program background; highlights of the Federal Bonding Program; what to do if you are seeking bonding; procedures for bond purchases and management; Directory of State Bonding Coordinators; marketing tools; and news and resources.

The Federal Bonding Program: A US Department of Labor Initiative Cover
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