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Recently found corrections resources available online.
New in the Library
On Life Support: Public Health in the Age of Mass Incarceration
Posted: 3 days ago
(2014) This report is an excellent introduction to the relationship between incarceration and public health and its significance for society. It is essential reading for anyone working within the fields of corrections and public health. Sections cover: the burden of disease behind bars—mental health, substance use and addiction, infectious disease, chronic disease, violence and self-harm, greater health disparities for women, and geriatric health; conditions of confinement and health—overcrowding, solitary confinement, sexual victimization, and quality of care; the health of communities--family structure, education and employment opportunities, housing stability and social entitlements, health insurance, and political capital; a political landscape ripe for reform; and the potential of the Affordable Care Act (ACA)—bolstering community capacity, strengthening front-end alternatives to arrest, prosecution, and incarceration, bridging health and justice systems, enabling outreach and care coordination, enrolling across the criminal justice continuum, granting Medicaid waivers and innovation, advancing health information technology, and regional challenges with the ACA.
New in the Library
Ten Economic Facts about Crime and Incarceration in the United States
Posted: 3 days ago
(2014) "Crime and high rates of incarceration impose tremendous costs on society, with lasting negative effects on individuals, families, and communities. Rates of crime in the United States have been falling steadily, but still constitute a serious economic and social challenge. At the same time, the incarceration rate in the United States is so high—more than 700 out of every 100,000 people are incarcerated—that both crime scholars and policymakers alike question whether, for nonviolent criminals in particular, the social costs of incarceration exceed the social benefits … Despite the ongoing decline in crime, the incarceration rate in the United States remains at a historically unprecedented level. This high incarceration rate can have profound effects on society" and is extremely expensive for state and federal agencies (p. 1). This policy memo provides a clear and concise explanation of the impacts of incarceration on communities in the United States. The ten facts are organized into three chapters: the landscape of crime in the U.S.—offenders and victims; the extraordinary growth of mass incarceration in the U.S.; and the economic and social costs of crime and incarceration. Some of these facts include: the majority of criminal offenders are younger than age thirty; federal and state policies have driven up the incarceration rate over the past thirty years; and per capita expenditures on corrections more than tripled over the same time period.
New in the Library
Think Before You Act: A New Approach to Preventing Youth Violence and Dropout
Posted: 3 days ago
(2014) This paper offers an innovative way to reduce the incarceration of juveniles in the United Sates based on randomized controlled trials in Chicago which showed a reduction in arrests for violent crime by an average of 40% with benefits to the community of almost 30 times the program's costs. "Improving the long-term life outcomes of disadvantaged youths remains a top policy priority in the United States. Unfortunately, long-term progress in improving outcomes like high school graduation rates and reduction of violent crime has been limited, partly because finding ways to successfully improve outcomes for disadvantaged youths (particularly males) has proven to be challenging. We believe one reason so many previous strategies have failed is because they at least implicitly assume that young people are forward-looking and consider the long-term consequences of their actions before they act. But a growing body of research in psychology and behavioral economics suggests that a great deal of everyone’s behavior happens intuitively and automatically, with little deliberate thought. Although it is often helpful for us to rely on automatic responses to guide our daily behavior, doing so can also get us into trouble, with consequences that are particularly severe for young people growing up in distressed urban areas where gangs, drugs, and guns are prevalent. We thus propose that the federal government aim to provide each teenager living in poverty in the United States with one year of behaviorally informed programming, intended to help youths recognize high-stakes situations when their automatic responses may be maladaptive" (p. 1).
New in the Library
Liberal but Not Stupid: Meeting the Promise of Downsizing Prisons
Posted: 4 days ago
(2014) This is essential reading for anyone involved or interested in corrections reform and in particular, the effective reduction of prison populations. "A confluence of factors — a perfect storm — interfered with the intractable rise of imprisonment and contributed to the emergence of a new sensibility defining continued mass imprisonment as non-sustainable. In this context, reducing America’s prisons has materialized as a viable possibility … In the end, successful downsizing must be “liberal but not stupid.” Thus, reform efforts must be guided not only by progressive values but also by a clear reliance on scientific knowledge about corrections and on a willingness to address the pragmatic issues that can thwart good intentions. Ultimately, a “criminology of downsizing” must be developed to foster effective policy interventions" (p. 1). Sections following an abstract address; the end of mass imprisonment; a perfect storm; good intentions are not enough; five reasons why downsizing reform might fail; five reasons why downsizing reform could succeed; lessons from California; and five principles to follow in downsizing prisons.
New in the Library
Positive Youth Justice Website
Posted: 4 days ago
(2014) This website "is designed to support and promote youth justice programs that are informed by the science of adolescent development. Despite the obvious relevance of developmental science for the design and operation of youth justice programs, these concepts are not yet the dominant framework for interventions in youth justice. One way to increase the efficacy of youth justice would be to build programs and policies using the Positive Youth Justice Model (PYJ), which is a practical guide for applying developmental principles in justice settings … The Positive Youth Justice website is designed to explain and disseminate the concepts and strategies suggested by the PYJ Model." The Positive Youth Justice Model integrates the interaction of two core assets (learning/doing and attaching/belonging) with six practice domains (work, education, relationships, community, health, and creativity). Points of access include: about—origins and background; basics, model authors, and the PYJ Model; key concepts—changing the frame, disruptive innovation, overcoming obstacles, social control theory, and understanding PYD; leading innovators; youth justice program Gold and Silver medal winners; and reference library—practice, and research.
New in the Library
Condom Distribution in U.S. Correctional Facilities and Canada
Posted: 5 days ago
(2014) This is an excellent document that provides information about how correctional facilities provide condoms within their walls. "Five cities or counties have condom distribution programs in their jails: Los Angeles, New York, Philadelphia, San Francisco, and Washington DC, and two states, Vermont and Mississippi, have condom distribution programs in their prisons" (p. 1). Also included is information gotten from the Correctional Service of Canada (CSC) about their issuance of condoms.
New in the Library
Certified Religious Diet Specifications Quote Sheet – FY 2015
Posted: 5 days ago
(2014) This is a great example of the specified ingredients for various types of kosher meals. This document contain sections covering; religious certification requirements for meals by accepted Orthodox kosher certification agencies; general meal specifications; and the exact diet specifications for 14 meals and 22 kosher items.
New in the Library
NDTAC Fact Sheet: Improving Services for Youth Who Are LGBT in Juvenile Justice Systems
Posted: 6 days ago
(2014) "To promote the safe, inclusive treatment of youth who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) in juvenile justice systems, this fact sheet serves as a resource to enhance the capacity of State and local administrators and practitioners to improve policies and practices" (p. 1). Sections of this fact sheet include: key concepts; experiences of youth who are LGBT; juvenile justice involvement among youth who are LGBT—a snapshot; entry of these youth into the juvenile justice system; juvenile justice system experiences of these youth; policy and practice recommendations; additional resources; and conclusion.
New in the Library
Updated Inventory of Evidence-Based, Research-Based, and Promising Practices for Prevention and Intervention Services For Children and Juveniles in the Child Welfare, Juvenile Justice, and Mental Health Systems
Posted: 6 days ago
(2014) Prevention and intervention services (mental health, child welfare, and juvenile justice) provided to children and juveniles are inventoried. These programs are primarily evidence-based and research-based and offered in a culturally competent way. "The definitions developed for evidence-based and research-based are high standards of rigor and represent programs that demonstrate effectiveness at achieving certain outcomes … To assemble the inventory, we operationalize each criterion for both the current law definitions for children as well as the suggested definitions of evidence-based and research-based … [In addition] the WSIPP benefit-cost model is used to determine whether a program meets the benefit-cost criterion by testing the probability that benefits exceed costs. Programs that do not achieve at least a 75% chance of a positive net present value do not meet the benefit-cost test" (p. 1). The Report explains any changes to the inventory since January 2014. The Inventory shows: budget area—child welfare, juvenile justice, mental health, general prevention, and substance abuse; program/intervention; manual; current law definitions—evidence-based, research-based, promising practice; suggested definitions—evidence-based, research-based, and promising practice; cost-beneficial; reason practice does not meet suggested evidence-based criteria—benefit-cost, heterogeneity, mixed results, program cost, single evaluation, and weight of evidence; and percent minority.
New in the Library
Youth Deincarceration
Posted: 9 days ago
(2014) "NCCD has produced a series of reports regarding the dramatic reduction of youth incarceration rates in most US states over the past 10 years. NCCD studied the deincarceration trend through interviews with key stakeholders, listening sessions in five states, a national convening of juvenile justice leaders, and the compilation and analysis of county-level data from five jurisdictions. While the trend is encouraging, much higher percentages of youth of color remain under formal supervision and in state secure facilities; more reform work is needed." Reports comprising this series are: "Stakeholders Views on the Movement to Reduce Youth Incarceration"; "Using Bills and Budgets to Further Reduce Youth Incarceration"; "Supervision Strategies for Justice-Involved Youth"; "Close to Home: Strategies to Place Young People in Their Communities"; "Engaging Juvenile Justice System-Involved Families"; "Study Methods for the NCCD Deincarceration Project"; "Stemming the Flow of Youth Into Adult Systems"; "Examining the Role of States in Monitoring Conditions and Outcomes for Youth"; and "Notes and Resources for the NCCD Deincarceration Report Series". All of the above reports are written by Antoinette Davis, Angela Irvine, and Jason Ziedenberg.
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News
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Important corrections news and announcements.
Corrections News
PRC Webinars December 2014
Posted: 5 days ago
The National PREA Resource Center (PRC), operated by the National Council on Crime and Delinquency through a cooperative agreement with the Bureau of Justice Assistance recently announced these items and events for December 2014. Check the the PRC website for the most up-to-date information. All are free to attend. From the PRC Website: Upcoming Webinars/Presentations Understanding LGBTI Inmates and Residents Tuesday, December 9, 2014 (3:00–4:30 p.m. EST)) Click here to learn more. Click here to register. Meeting the Youthful Inmate Standard: Implications for Operations, Promising Practices, and the Law Tuesday, December 16, 2014 (2:00–3:30 p.m. EST) Click here to learn more. Click here to register. For additional resources from NIC PREA/Offender Sexual Abuse
Corrections News
Apply Now: Women's Addiction Services Leadership Institute
Posted: 6 days ago
The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) is looking for candidates for the fourth national Women’s Addiction Services Leadership Institute (WASLI). The 2015 WASLI is focused on emerging leaders in women s behavioral health (treatment and prevention). It offers the resources, tools, and inspiration needed by tomorrow s leaders as they continue to grow and develop quality services for women across the United States. The 2015 WASLI associates will be selected through a competitive application process. SAMHSA CSAT sponsors WASLI and covers the following costs for Associates: program materials two in-person training programs, including airfare and lodging costs individualized assessments monthly calls using a toll-free teleconference line. Associates will be responsible for covering the costs of ground transportation, food, baggage fees, and incidentals during their travel. Applications must be received by December 8, 2014. Apply to become a
Corrections News
In the News: Stop Putting Women in Jail
Posted: 6 days ago
A recent article published in The Washington Post discusses the movement in Britain to close women’s prisons and applies that rationale to women’s incarceration in the United States. We should stop putting women in jail. For anything highlights the current state of women’s incarceration and possible alternatives through community interventions. From the article: Women’s incarceration has risen by 646 percent in the past 30 years. The majority are nonviolent offenders with poor education, little employment experience and multiple histories of abuse from childhood through adulthood. Efforts to make prison “work” for women have only perpetuated the growth of the prison industrial complex. State-funded Project Redeploy in Illinois has built upon the evidence that nonviolent offenders are more effectively treated in their communities by diverting 1,376 nonviolent offenders from prison since January 2011, when the program began, through the end of 2013. Read the full article
Corrections News
In the News: Improvements at Tutwiler Prison for Women
Posted: 14 days ago
A recent article published in AL.com, an Alabama online news service, outlines how Alabama prison officials and a national consulting firm, the Moss Group, are making significant improvements at the Julia Tutwiler Prison for Women. 6 months into consultants work at Tutwiler prison: What s finished? What else is planned? highlights accomplishments over the last six months at the prison and what is expected to occur over the next year. Example projects completed, in progress and upcoming: Completed: More than 300 cameras now monitor the prison 24/7. Completed: More women are becoming correctional officers. In progress: Staff and supervisors are learning how to interact with female offenders. Upcoming: Review process for investigating prisoner complaints. Upcoming: PREA coordinators training. Read the full article ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ This announcement is available at NIC s Gender-Respon
Corrections News
Upcoming Webinar - Justice-Involved Women: Understanding Trauma and Violence
Posted: 14 days ago
This free webinar, Justice-Involved Women: Understanding Trauma and Violence, is hosted by the National Clearinghouse for the Defense of Battered Women and will focus on women who have experienced or perpetrated interpersonal and domestic violence. The webinar will also introduce a new evidence-based curriculum, Beyond Violence, which is designed for women who are in the criminal justice system with histories of aggression and/or violence. Presenter: Stephanie Covington, PhD, LCSW, Center for Gender and Justice Date/Time: Wednesday, November 12th 3-4:30 PM ET Register here ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ This announcement is available at NIC s Gender-Responsive News for Women and Girls. Feel free to forward to friends and colleagues. Subscribe to the newsletter at http://nicic.gov/go/subscribe. For additional resources on Justice-Involved Women go to NIC’s Women Offenders.
Corrections News
New from NIC: Fundamentals of Bail
Posted: 18 days ago
The National Institute of Corrections (NIC) has partnered with Tim Schnacke from the Center for Legal and Evidence-Based Practices to produce a new publication titled, Fundamentals of Bail: A Resource Guide for Pretrial Practitioners and a Framework for American Pretrial Reform, part of a series of papers dealing with acute criminal pretrial issues. This paper, which summarizes (1) why America needs pretrial justice, (2) the history of bail, (3) the legal foundations of the pretrial phase of a criminal case, (4) the pretrial research, (5) the national standards, and (6) terms and phrases used at bail, is unique in the field and is designed to provide anyone interested in pretrial justice (from criminal justice line-staff to governors, legislators, and justices on the supreme court) a broad overview of the issues facing America in this generation of bail reform as well as rational solutions to those issues so that this generation will potentially be America’s last. Like the title s
Corrections News
New from NIC: Money as a Criminal Justice Stakeholder
Posted: 18 days ago
The National Institute of Corrections (NIC) has partnered with Tim Schnacke from the Center for Legal and Evidence-Based Practices to produce a new publication titled, Money as a Criminal Justice Stakeholder: The Judge’s Decision to Release or Detain a Defendant Pretrial, part of a series of papers dealing with acute criminal pretrial issues. This paper provides an in-depth discussion of arguably the most important part of the criminal pretrial process – the judge’s release or detain decision – and how America’s overuse of secured money at bail tends to hinder or derail that decision, leading to our current crisis of both unintended detention and release. The paper discusses the proper decision-making process in light of the history of bail and the law intertwined with that history, holds up the current process to the national pretrial best-practice standards, and shows how recent empirical pretrial research can be used by judges to make definitive “in-or-out” decisions, immediate
Corrections News
In the News: Washington State’s Gender Responsive Approach
Posted: 20 days ago
A recent article published in The Seattle Times outlines the steps Washington State has been taking to adapt to the needs of a larger women’s prison population. Women behind bars: State takes a new approach highlights how the Washington State prison system has embraced a decade-long University of Cincinnati study into every aspect of female felons’ lives to create a “Gender Responsiveness Action Plan.” Under the Gender Responsiveness Action Plan: Female offenders can attend seminars focusing on healthy relationships, safety awareness, health and nutrition, handling anger and stress, and goal setting. Inmates can also mentor others and offer a friendly ear to other women in need. Staff at the women’s prison have been undergoing training in gender issues, with education focusing on the past trauma female inmates have suffered. DOC officials are also reviewing their methods of classifying female inmates for housing and labeling their risk to reoffend. -------------------
Corrections News
New E-Course: Communicating Effectively and Professionally with LGBTI Offenders
Posted: 26 days ago
The National Institute of Corrections is now offering a one hour e-course focused on strategies for communicating respectfully with all offenders, with a specific focus on lesbian, gay, bi-sexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) offenders. Communicating Effectively and Professionally with LGBTI Offenders is available through the NIC Learning Center and is appropriate for corrections professionals working with adults in jails, prisons, and community correction. Enroll Here ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Additional resources from NIC on LGBTI Offenders
Corrections News
Problem Solving Clinic on the Women’s Risk Needs Assessment
Posted: 34 days ago
If you missed the live Webinar, you can still listen to the recorded version of “Problem Solving Clinic on the Women s Risk Needs Assessment”. This webinar was aired on August 20, 2014 and co-sponsored by the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Assistance and the National Institute of Corrections . A select list of invitees participating in this webinar: Articulated the benefits and challenges of using the WRNA. Learned about solutions to similar challenges. Acquired information about best practices for implementing gender-responsive assessments alone or in conjunction with other risk assessment tools. Were made aware of resources available from NRCJIW, National Institute of Corrections, and the University of Cincinnati. You can access the PowerPoint slides and the audio recording of the webinar at: http://cjinvolvedwomen.org/webinar-problem-solving-clinic-on-the-womens-risk-needs-assessment This announcement is available at NIC
Older News
Training
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Upcoming training, broadcasts, and e-learning opportunities.
Training Opportunity
Correctional Industries Director's Training
Register Before: July 24, 2015
(Begins September 22, 2015) Correctional Industries Director's Training. Correctional Industry Directors are called upon to provide dynamic and effective leadership which is a critical component in the success of any organization. Expanding leadership knowledge and enhancing leadership skills is the foundation for this training as it helps lay the groundwork for the complex work that must be done in this ever changing and challenging industry.
Training Opportunity
Women Offenders: Developing an Agencywide Approach
Register Before: June 13, 2015
(Begins August 11, 2015) This revised blended learning program, with combined independent and on-site activities will total approximately 40 hours over the course of a year. Incorporated into the course requirements are Blended-learning activities to include a webinar, an organizational readiness survey, independent reading and personalized coaching throughout the year to assist agencies in directing their planned change. On-site activities include a 2.5 day, in-class training at the National Corrections Academy in Aurora, Colorado.
Training Opportunity
National Sheriffs' Institute
Register Before: May 29, 2015
(Begins August 30, 2015) The National Sheriffs' Institute (NSI), sponsored by the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) and the National Sheriffs' Association (NSA), is designed to enhance your leadership skills as you take on the challenges of your first term as sheriff. It is the only executive leadership program designed specifically for first-term sheriffs. It was first developed and delivered in the early 1970s and has changed over the years to meet the evolving needs of first-term sheriffs. The program is held in Aurora, Colorado.
Training Opportunity
Executive Excellence Program
Register Before: March 31, 2015
(Begins May 31, 2015) This 10-month executive development program offers innovative learner-centered and competency-based training for future leaders of corrections agencies.
Training Opportunity
Offender Employment Retention Specialist (OERS) Training
Register Before: March 06, 2015
(Begins May 04, 2015) The OERS training combines motivational interviewing techniques with cognitive behavioral principles to teach practitioners how to increase the offenders’ motivation for change while addressing the thoughts and feelings that negatively impact employment retention and successful reentry.
Training Opportunity
Executive Manager Program in Correctional Health Care
Register Before: March 01, 2015
(Begins May 04, 2015) The goal of this new training is to develop a better-prepared correctional senior-level workforce that is knowledgeable in health care administration. Training topics include: Government regulatory standards; Constitutional requirements and ethics; Strategic planning; Quality improvement; Workforce development; Finances; Contracts; Administration of health care; Mental health, Dental health, Custody needs to know; Keystone/Capstone case.
Training Opportunity
Large Jail Administration
Register Before: February 27, 2015
(Begins May 31, 2015) Managing the operations of a large jail requires a unique set of tools and vision for daily operations that smaller jails cannot emulate. Recognizing the difference, NIC offers Large Jail Administration to address the specific needs of large jails. This 40-hour course focuses on assisting newly appointed jail administrators responsible for the oversight of a jail or jail system with 1,000 or more inmates.
Training Opportunity
Managing Restrictive Housing Populations
Register Before: February 01, 2015
(Begins March 23, 2015) This 40-hour training program focuses on the management of Restrictive Housing populations within the control and jurisdiction of departments of corrections throughout the country. The program explores fundamental issues in programs that attempt to reintegrate violent offenders back into general populations which precludes releasing them directly from maximum confinement back to the community. The program also addresses legal issues surrounding restrictive housing, gang management, prison culture and climate, and classification of restrictive housing offenders.
Training Opportunity
National Sheriffs' Institute
Register Before: January 09, 2015
(Begins April 12, 2015) The National Sheriffs' Institute (NSI), sponsored by the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) and the National Sheriffs' Association (NSA), is designed to enhance your leadership skills as you take on the challenges of your first term as sheriff. It is the only executive leadership program designed specifically for first-term sheriffs. It was first developed and delivered in the early 1970s and has changed over the years to meet the evolving needs of first-term sheriffs. The program is held in Aurora, Colorado.
Training Opportunity
Executive Training for New Wardens
Register Before: January 02, 2015
(Begins April 06, 2015) This 36 hour program helps participants enhance their skills in areas essential to effective leadership and administration of a correctional institution.
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