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Recently found corrections resources available online.
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Surviving the Streets of New York: Experiences of LGBTQ Youth, YMSM, and YWSW Engaged in Survival Sex
Posted: 1 hr ago
(2015) This is "the first study to focus on lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer or questioning (LGBTQ) youth; young men who have sex with men (YMSM); and young women who have sex with women (YWSW) who get involved in the commercial sex market in order to meet basic survival needs, such as food or shelter. The report documents these youth’s experiences and characteristics to gain a better understanding of why they engage in survival sex, describes how the support networks and systems in their lives have both helped them and let them down, and makes recommendations for better meeting the needs of this vulnerable population " (website). Sections of this report include; highlights; youths' engagement in the commercial sex trade for survival; current study goals and methodology; findings regarding the characteristics of LGBTQ youth, YMSM, and YWSW engaged in survival in New York City, the pathways into the survival-sex trade for this population, the characteristics of the commercial sex market, how much the youth earn and how they spend these earnings, the physical risks to them and how they protect themselves, the ways others help the youth find customers, the number of youth involved in exploitative situations, the composition of the youths' network, and the youths' perceptions of engaging in survival sex; discussion and summary; policy and practice guidelines; and main findings.
New in the Library
Improving Illinois’ Response to Sexual Offenses Committed by Youth: Recommendations for Law, Policy, and Practice
Posted: 2 hrs ago
(2014) While this report comments on issues related to youth who sexually offend in Illinois, its recommendations are applicable to any state. “The increased availability of high-quality, reliable, youth-specific research findings presents an exceptional opportunity to align law and practice with expert consensus about best practices for responding to youth sex offenses. Most importantly, research over the last few decades has conclusively established that youth are highly amenable to treatment and highly unlikely to sexually reoffend. Research also indicates that strategies used with adults—principally sex offender registries and residency/employment restrictions—are not only unnecessary as applied to youth, but also counterproductive, as they often jeopardize victim confidentiality and can interfere with youth rehabilitation to an extent that undermines the long-term safety and well-being of our communities. In recognition of this research and the vital need to identify evidence-based best practices with regard to this very serious issue, the General Assembly charged the Illinois Juvenile Justice Commission with making recommendations to ensure the effective treatment and supervision of youth who are adjudicated delinquent for a sex offense” (p. 6). While some of Illinois’ practices related to sex offending by youth are based on “what works” research, some are not. Thus, the Commission has made three recommendations to align law, policy, and practice with research on effective interventions for juvenile sex offenders: Recommendation 1--Develop and implement professional best practice standards and provide current, objective, and evidence-informed training for professionals who work with youth offenders and victims of sexual abuse; Recommendation 2--Equip courts and communities to intervene effectively with individualized, community-based, family-focused services and supervision; and Recommendation 3--Remove young people from the state’s counter-productive sex offender registry and the categorical application of restrictions and collateral consequences. This website provides access to: the full report (150 pages); the report without Appendices (61 pages); the Executive Summary; the Fact Sheet; the Press Release; and audio from the March 25, 2014 Report Release Conference Call.
New in the Library
What Caused the Crime Decline?
Posted: 3 hrs ago
(2015) This report "examines one of the nation’s least understood recent phenomena – the dramatic decline in crime nationwide over the past two decades – and analyzes various theories for why it occurred, by reviewing more than 40 years of data from all 50 states and the 50 largest cities. It concludes that over-harsh criminal justice policies, particularly increased incarceration, which rose even more dramatically over the same period, were not the main drivers of the crime decline. In fact, the report finds that increased incarceration has been declining in its effectiveness as a crime control tactic for more than 30 years. Its effect on crime rates since 1990 has been limited, and has been non-existent since 2000. More important were various social, economic, and environmental factors, such as growth in income and an aging population. The introduction of CompStat, a data-driven policing technique, also played a significant role in reducing crime in cities that introduced it" (website). This report is divided into two parts following an executive summary. Part I—State-Level Analysis of Crime: criminal justice policies—increased incarceration, increased police numbers, use of the death penalty, and enactment of right-to-carry gun laws; economic factors—unemployment, growth in income, inflation, and consumer confidence; and social and environmental factors—decreased alcohol consumption, aging population, decreased crack use, legalization of abortion, and decreased lead in gasoline. Part II—City-Level Analysis of Crime: policing—introduction of CompStat.
New in the Library
Corrections and Reentry: Protected Health Information Privacy Framework for Information Sharing
Posted: 1 day ago
(2014) "This resource was designed to enable correctional entities to comply with HIPAA and 42 CFR Part 2 in the receipt or sharing of PHI [public health information], whether the correctional entity meets HIPAA’s designation of a “covered entity,”17 is determined by 42 CFR Part 2 to be a “federally assisted program,”18 or does not meet either criteria. The tools within the resource may be used by any correctional entity interested in articulating its commitment to protecting PHI and implementing the components of a privacy framework." This publication is made up of three chapters: introduction; overview of HIPAA and 42 CFR Part 2 regulations—HIPAA regulations regarding medical and mental health information, and 42 CFR Part 2 regarding substance abuse information; and PHI policy development template. Appendixes include: glossary; listing of applicable federal laws; release of information—consent authorization guidance; contractual agreements; court orders; 42 CFR 2.22—Notice to Patients of Federal Confidentiality Requirements; PHI Privacy Policy Review Checklist; and standards and resource list.
New in the Library
Because Kids are Different: Five Opportunities for Reforming the Juvenile Justice System
Posted: 1 day ago
(2014) "As broader acceptance of recent findings in the field of adolescent development has opened the way for change, juvenile justice policymakers, stakeholders, practitioners, and advocates across the country have not been slow to champion numerous innovations in policy and practice, generating remarkable momentum for reform. This momentum can be leveraged to change policy in five areas where current practice is fundamentally incompatible with healthy adolescent development … This document seeks to concisely frame these policies in light of the research on adolescent development, and thereby aid the juvenile justice reform field in taking strategic action to create a developmentally appropriate juvenile justice system that keeps everyone safer" (p. 4). Sections of this report cover: what we know about adolescent development and juvenile justice interventions—research findings showing that juveniles are different, fairness demands a new approach to youth offending, a developmental approach makes communities safer, and treating youth differently costs less; four recent U.S. Supreme Court rulings stating youth must be treated differently than adults; four lessons for juvenile justice policymakers from the National Research Council; five opportunities for developmentally appropriate policy change with descriptions of current practice, the developmental perspective, and the characteristics of a model system—prosecution of youth in the adult criminal system, solitary confinement, safeguarding confidentiality, registries for youth who commit sex offense, and courtroom shackling; and towards an age-appropriate justice system for young people.
New in the Library
Envisioning the Next Generation of Behavioral Health and Criminal Justice Interventions
Posted: 2 days ago
(2014) "The purpose of this paper is to cast a vision for the next generation of behavioral health and criminal justice interventions by presenting a set of empirically informed individual and environmental factors that directly and indirectly contribute to criminal justice involvement for individuals with SMI and are, therefore, critical targets for intervention. Although justice-involved persons with SMI bear unique stressors attributable to their mental illness, they also have many “normal” risk factors for criminal behavior. Attending to these shared risk factors, when combined with those associated directly with mental illness, provides a richer, more nuanced foundation for the next generation of interventions, which will likely improve their performance in reducing recidivism and psychiatric relapse" (p. 428). Sections of this article include: introduction; first-generation mental health and criminal justice intervention, such as "jail diversion programs, mental health courts, specialized probation and parole caseloads, and forensic mental health services emphasizing psychiatric rehabilitation" (p. 427); the next generation of behavioral health and criminal justice interventions—person-place framework attributes of criminality, person-level factors (mental illness, criminogenic risk, addictions, and trauma), place-level factors (social and environmental disadvantages), stress as a mediating catalyst, and identifying "intervenable" risk factors; recommendations for the next generation of interventions; and conclusions.
New in the Library
Prisoner Reentry, Parole Violations, and the Persistence of the Surveillance State
Posted: 2 days ago
(2014) "The increasing reliance on revocation as a standard tool of parole supervision has created a "separate path to prison for large numbers of former prisoners" … Despite the routine use of parole violations and sanctions – collectively referred to as “back-end sentencing” – as a means of surveillance and punishment, policymakers and reentry scholars are only just starting to explore the contribution of this process to the reentry recycling of offenders through the correctional system" (p. 1-2). This dissertation examines how parole revocation impacts offenders' abilities to successfully reenter their communities. Five chapters make up this dissertation: introduction to parole violations and the three stages of prison's revolving door; the role of social service proximity in prisoner reentry—"how neighborhood contextual conditions shape the likelihood that parolees receive violation reports"; institutional sanctions in context—the impact of county-level characteristics on parole outcomes; the effects of short-term custodial sanctions on labor market outcomes among former prisoners; and conclusion.
New in the Library
Guiding Principles for Providing High-Quality Education in Juvenile Justice Secure Care Settings
Posted: 2 days ago
(2014) This is necessary reading for anyone involved with educating incarcerated youth. "Providing high-quality education in juvenile justice secure care settings presents unique challenges for the administrators, teachers, and staff who are responsible for the education, rehabilitation, and welfare of youths committed to their care … The more than 2,500 juvenile justice residential facilities across the country need support from federal, state, and local educational agencies; the broader juvenile justice system (particularly the juvenile justice agencies that oversee facilities); and their communities to improve services for committed youths. The services provided to them in secure care facilities should be developmentally appropriate and focus on the youths’ educational, social-emotional, behavioral, and career planning needs so that their time within a secure care facility is a positive experience during which they attain new skills and move on to a more productive path. Building on prior guidance from ED and DOJ, this report focuses on five guiding principles recommended by the federal government for providing high-quality education in juvenile justice secure care settings" (p. iv). Briefly, the five guiding principles and supporting core activities are: the need of a safe, healthy, and facility-wide climate that supports all youth; necessary funding; recruitment, employment, and retention of qualified staff; rigorous and relevant curricula; and formal processes and procedures. The report expands and describes each principle in detail. A list of relevant federal laws, with links to the documents, is also included.
New in the Library
Black Lives Matter: Eliminating Racial Inequality in the Criminal Justice System
Posted: 3 days ago
(2015) "The criminal justice system’s high volume of contact with people of color is a major cause of African Americans’ disproportionate rate of fatal police encounters, as well as of broader perceptions of injustice in many communities. This briefing paper identifies four key features of the justice system that contribute to its disparate racial impact, and presents recent best practices for targeting these inequities drawn from adult and juvenile justice systems around the country. In many cases, these practices have produced demonstrable results" (p. 3). Six sections follow and executive summary: uneven policing in Ferguson and New York City; a cascade of racial disparities throughout the criminal justice system; causes of disparities—differential crime rates, and four key sources of unwarranted racial disparities in criminal justice outcomes; best practices for reducing racial disparities--revise policies and laws with disparate racial impact, address implicit racial bias among criminal justice professionals, reallocate resources to create a fair playing field, and revise policies that exacerbate socioeconomic inequalities and redirect public spending toward crime prevention and drug treatment; implementation strategies and metrics for success; and conclusion.
New in the Library
A Confinement in Texas Solitary Failure: The Waste, Cost and Harm of Solitary
Posted: 3 days ago
(2015) "The Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ) confines 4.4 percent of its prison population in solitary confinement. Texas locks more people in solitary-confinement cells than twelve states house in their entire prison system. On average, prisoners remain in solitary confinement for almost four years; over one hundred Texas prisoners have spent more than twenty years in solitary confinement. The conditions in which these people live impose such severe deprivations that they leave prison mentally damaged; as a group, people released from solitary are more likely to commit more new crimes than people released from the rest of the prison system. Yet in 2013, TDCJ released 1,243 people directly from solitary-confinement cells into Texas communities. These prisoners return to society after living for years or decades in a tiny cell for twenty-two hours a day, with no contact with other human beings or access to educational or rehabilitative programs. As documented in this report, this dangerous and expensive practice is making our state less safe" (p. 2). Section of this report following an executive summary discussing findings and recommendations: background—the early failure of solitary confinement, the misguided return to solitary confinement in the late Twentieth-Century, and the renewed consensus that solitary is a dangerous and expensive correctional practice; solitary confinement increases crime—solitary permanently damages people who will one day return to Texas communities, and the consequences of overusing solitary is more crime in Texas communities; Texas overuses solitary confinement at tremendous cost to taxpayers—costs are at least $46 million a year; TDCJ increases prison violence by overusing solitary confinement—solitary makes Texas prisons less safe, solitary deprives officers of the option to incentivize good behavior, violence escalates when officers deny people in solitary basic necessities, and other states improved prison safety by reducing solitary; mentally ill people deteriorate in solitary confinement-the universal consensus is that you should never place the seriously mentally ill in solitary, Texas sends thousands of people with mental illness to solitary, and TDCJ inadequately monitors and treats people with mental illness in solitary; and conclusion—values and commitments as Texans.
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News
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Important corrections news and announcements.
Corrections News
Upcoming NCJA Webinar: Leveraging Health Care Reform to Enhance Successful Reentry
Posted: 2 days ago
From the National Criminal Justice Association (NCJA): With support from various agencies NCJA is offering this free webinar. See below for information on how to register for upcoming webinar events. Webinar Title: Planning For Success: Leveraging Health Care Reform to Enhance Successful Reentry Webinar Description: With more than 11 million people cycling through US jails every year and an estimated 10-30 percent of corrections spending going to inmate health and behavioral healthcare, there is an obvious need to not only focus on reentry but also on improving the continuity of care for individuals returning to the community. Planning For Success: Leveraging Health Reform to Enhance Successful Reentry will highlight planning efforts currently underway in Louisville, Kentucky and in Maricopa County, Arizona. Speakers will address how their multi-disciplinary planning efforts have used healthcare reform to bring together justice and health agencies to begin addressing the complex
Corrections News
Upcoming Webinar on Co-Occurring Mental Health Issues and Trauma in Women with Substance Use Disorders
Posted: 2 days ago
Join this free webinar, Women in the Mirror: Addressing Co-Occurring Mental Health Issues and Trauma in Women with Substance Use Disorders, being held on March 5, 2015 3:00-4:30 PM ET. Overview Women with substance use disorders have alarmingly high rates of co-occurring mental health issues and histories of trauma. Failure to address these issues and their interconnections can lead to significant setbacks in recovery. This session offers current information about effective interventions and strategies for supporting women with co-occurring substance use, trauma, and mental health issues. Topics include: trauma, eating disorders, depression, bipolar disorder, and PTSD among women with substance use disorders. Featured Speakers Francine Feinberg, Psy.D., LCSW: Dr. Feinberg is a nationally recognized expert in treating women with substance use disorders. For almost three decades she served as Executive Director of Meta House, in Milwaukee, WI, a substance abuse and mental health t
Corrections News
Register Now - Thinking for a Change: Train the Trainer
Posted: 1 week ago
Pass it on! Join NIC s Thinking for a Change (T4C): Train the Trainer course being held in Aurora, CO from July 7-9, 2015. Overview This training for trainers learning experience will equip participants that satisfactorily pass course requirements to use NIC s Thinking for a Change Facilitator Training curriculum in their own agencies. This course is designed to capacitate staff to train others to facilitate Thinking for a Change. Temporary access to NIC s web platform for delivery of the Facilitator Training will be granted to qualified graduates of this course to train facilitators in their agencies. Specific Course Events June 1,4,8,11,15,18,22, 25 (Internet and inter-session work) July 7,8,9 NCA Aurora (On-site classroom) Objectives This sixty-hour course, like the Facilitator Training course, is delivered in a blended format, consisting of live interactive web sessions, homework, practice sessions, and culminates in a three-day face-to-face advanced practicum at
Corrections News
Mark Your Calender: AJFO Conference
Posted: 1 week ago
The 16th Bi-Annual Adult and Juvenile Female Offenders (AJFO) conference will be held October 13-15, 2015. The conference is entitled Justice Involved Women and Girls: New Paths to Resiliency and will be located in Hartford, Connecticut at the Marriott Downtown. For future announcements visit: www.ajfo.org www.facebook.com/AJFOConnecticut www.womensconsortium.org Download flyer This announcement is available at NIC s Gender-Responsive News for Women and Girls. Feel free to forward to friends and colleagues. Subscribe to the newsletter at http://nicic.gov/go/subscribe. For additional resources on Justice-Involved Women go to NIC s Women Offenders.
Corrections News
TEDx Event: Does Gender Matter?
Posted: 1 week ago
The Washington State Department of Corrections is hosting a TEDx event at its Washington Corrections Center for Women, located in Gig Harbor, Washington. TED is a nonprofit devoted to Ideas Worth Spreading , usually in the form of short, powerful talks. It began in 1984 as a conference where Technology, Entertainment and Design converged, and today covers almost all topics from science to business to global issues in more than 100 languages. TEDx is an independently organized event designed to help communities, organizations and individuals spark conversation and connection through local TED-like experiences. Because ideas worth spreading are never bound by location or source, the Washington Corrections Center for Women is uniquely positioned to present a TEDx event entitled Does Gender Matter? . On March 14, 2015, the audience will hear 18 speakers, including community members, facility staff and volunteers and offenders present their ideas worth spreading, ideas that mak
Corrections News
NIC Live Event - Offender Reentry: The Value of Victim Involvement
Posted: 1 week ago
Live Event Preparation Information February 13, 2015 Offender Reentry: The Value of Victim Involvement There is still time to join us for a three hour live broadcast focusing on the unique opportunities and challenges of including victims in the offender reentry process. I think during reentry that a crime victim should be viewed as an opportunity, not an obligation. They can bring great input to the process. Anne Seymour, National Victims Advocate February 18, 2015 9am PT / 10am MT/AZ / 11am CT/ 12pm ET Register Now at this link http://nicic.gov/training/ib2015feb (green button on the right) Participant Guide In preparation for the broadcast, download the custom Participant Guide at this link http://nicic.gov/downloads/files/ib2015feb_15c9002%20part%20guide%20nic%20offender_%20reentry%20final%20508%202-18-15.pdf On-air Presenters will refer to it during the broadcast, and it contains content information, activities, useful resources and links to more informati
Corrections News
Streaming Tests - Offender Reentry: The Value of Victim Involvement Live Event
Posted: 2 weeks ago
Live Broadcast Registration and Preparation Information February 12, 2015 Offender Reentry: The Value of Victim Involvement There is still time to join us for a three hour live broadcast focusing on the unique opportunities and challenges of including victims in the offender reentry process. I think during reentry that a crime victim should be viewed as an opportunity, not an obligation. They can bring great input to the process. Anne Seymour, National Victims Advocate February 18, 2015 9am PT / 10am MT/AZ / 11am CT/ 12pm ET Register Now at this link http://nicic.gov/training/ib2015feb (green button on the right) Preparation for Internet Viewing Check Your Internet Stream Tests Continue Today! To view the broadcast via the internet, we are running streaming internet tests on the following dates and times (please adjust your time zones accordingly): Thursday, February 12 7 am - 5 pm PT / 10am 8pm ET Friday, February 13 12 pm - 5 pm PT / 3pm 8pm ET
Corrections News
Upcoming APPA Webinar: Re-entry in Alaska
Posted: 3 weeks ago
From the American Probation and Parole Association (APPA): With funding and support from various federal and private agencies, APPA periodically offers complimentary webinars designed to enhance its constituents knowledge and skills for providing more effective community-based corrections services. See below for information on current topics and how to register for upcoming webinar events. Webinar Title: Re-entry in Alaska - A Grassroots Approach to Reducing Recidivism through Community-Based, Collaborative Re-Entry Programs Webinar Description: Alaska has been making steady strides forward in focusing on initiatives that will help address the alarmingly high levels of incarceration and recidivism rates within the State. In April of 2014, with the passing of Senate Bill 64; Alaska made historical progress by addressing public safety, correctional spending and most importantly for this webinar; reducing recidivism rates. This webinar is produced by the American Probation and Pa
Corrections News
Updated – Corrections Statistics by State!
Posted: 3 weeks ago
Looking for the latest statistics for your state s crime or incarceration rate? See NIC s Corrections Statistics by State. In addition to an interactive map to select the state of your choice, you can view the state statistics in a table format and easily compare your state with others. Jails, prisons, and community corrections data are included for each state. State statistics are provided for: Violent Crime Rate Property Crime Rate Incarceration Rate Number of Probationers Number of Parolees Cost Per Inmate Find your state s statistics here.
Corrections News
NIC Virtual Conference: Call for Presentations
Posted: 3 weeks ago
The NIC Academy Division is currently accepting proposals to present workshops for the NIC Virtual Conference 2015: New Directions in Corrections. The Conference will go live June 10, 2015 from 9:00 AM MT to 2:00 PM MT. Join your colleagues as we learn together about current trends and issues in corrections, cutting-edge work in corrections, research-informed programs, and thought-provoking inspirational innovations that promote the best in corrections. The 2015 Virtual Conference will have an emphasis on the topic of Correctional Staff Wellness. However, a variety of topics are encouraged and examples include: undocumented immigrants, racial disparity in offender population and effects of privatization. Submission Deadline: February 10, 2015 Download details for submitting presentations here
Older News
Training
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Upcoming training, broadcasts, and e-learning opportunities.
Training Opportunity
Correctional Industries Director's Training
Register Before: July 24, 2015
(Begins September 22, 2015) Correctional Industries Director's Training. Correctional Industry Directors are called upon to provide dynamic and effective leadership which is a critical component in the success of any organization. Expanding leadership knowledge and enhancing leadership skills is the foundation for this training as it helps lay the groundwork for the complex work that must be done in this ever changing and challenging industry.
Training Opportunity
Offender Employment Retention Specialist (OERS) Training
Register Before: June 26, 2015
(Begins August 24, 2015) The OERS training combines motivational interviewing techniques with cognitive behavioral principles to teach practitioners how to increase the offenders’ motivation for change while addressing the thoughts and feelings that negatively impact employment retention and successful reentry.
Training Opportunity
Large Jail Network Meeting
Register Before: June 19, 2015
(Begins September 27, 2015) The goals of the Large Jail Network are to explore issues facing jail systems from the perspectives of network members with administrative responsibility and to discuss strategies and resources for dealing successfully with these issues.
Training Opportunity
Executive Training for New Wardens
Register Before: June 18, 2015
(Begins September 21, 2015) This 36 hour program helps participants enhance their skills in areas essential to effective leadership and administration of a correctional institution.
Training Opportunity
Conducting Security Audits
Register Before: June 16, 2015
(Begins September 14, 2015) With NIC’s hands-on, onsite training, gain the experience of auditing out-of-state institutions of various security levels and missions. This 36-hour training program supplements classroom instruction in auditing protocol with tours of assigned facilities and real-world assignments that put newly trained participants in charge of the auditing process.
Training Opportunity
Women Offenders: Developing an Agencywide Approach
Register Before: June 13, 2015
(Begins August 11, 2015) This revised blended learning program, with combined independent and on-site activities will total approximately 40 hours over the course of a year. Incorporated into the course requirements are Blended-learning activities to include a webinar, an organizational readiness survey, independent reading and personalized coaching throughout the year to assist agencies in directing their planned change. On-site activities include a 2.5 day, in-class training at the National Corrections Academy in Aurora, Colorado.
Training Opportunity
Executive Excellence Program
Register Before: June 01, 2015
(Begins August 23, 2015) This 10-month executive development program offers innovative learner-centered and competency-based training for future leaders of corrections agencies.
Training Opportunity
Orientation for New Parole Board Members
Register Before: June 01, 2015
(Begins July 28, 2015) This training program helps participants build competencies and skills in performing the tasks that matter most.
Training Opportunity
National Sheriffs' Institute
Register Before: May 29, 2015
(Begins August 30, 2015) The National Sheriffs' Institute (NSI), sponsored by the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) and the National Sheriffs' Association (NSA), is designed to enhance your leadership skills as you take on the challenges of your first term as sheriff. It is the only executive leadership program designed specifically for first-term sheriffs. It was first developed and delivered in the early 1970s and has changed over the years to meet the evolving needs of first-term sheriffs. The program is held in Aurora, Colorado.
Training Opportunity
Planning of New Institutions
Register Before: May 22, 2015
(Begins August 24, 2015) This 32-hour training program teaches the importance of in-depth planning before starting facility design.
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