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Recently found corrections resources available online.
New in the Library
The Effect of Collateral Consequence Laws on State Rates of Returns to Prison
Posted: 2 days ago
(2014) "In this dissertation I [Sohoni] examine the effect of states’ collateral consequence laws in the categories of voting, access to public records, employment, public housing, public assistance, and driver’s licenses. I examine the impact of these laws on state rates of returns to prison, as measured by percent of prison admissions that were people on conditional release when they entered prison, the percent of exits from parole that were considered unsuccessful due returning to incarceration; the percent of exits from parole that were returned to incarceration for a new sentence, and the percent of exits from parole that were returned to incarceration for a technical violation. I also run an additional fixed effects analysis on the effect of restrictions on Temporary Assistance for Needy Children (TANF) over a seven year period." This study is the first one done to address what is known empirically about how certain collateral consequence laws negatively influence the ability of ex-offenders to reenter their communities. This dissertation is comprised of five chapters: introduction to reentry and the era of mass incarceration, goals and realities of collateral consequence laws, and the current study; collateral consequence laws in the United States—overview, legal challenges and concerns, effects, and collateral consequences and recidivism; data and methods; findings regarding voting, access to records, employment, public housing, public assistance, driver's licenses, the cumulative effect, fixed effects analysis of TANF restrictions, and discussion of results; and conclusions.
New in the Library
Using Title IV-E for Juvenile Justice: The Multnomah County Experience [Webinar]
Posted: 2 days ago
(2014) This webinar explains how your agency can utilize funds from Title IV of the Social Security Act, Part E – Federal Payments for Foster Care and Adoption Assistance for programming in your agency. Topics discussed include: what Title IV-E is; classification of Title IV-E claiming; what juvenile agencies can receive Title IV-E reimbursements for; developing and implementing a Title IV-E Claiming Program; stakeholders need for collaboration; the critical role of the Oregon Department of Human Services in collaboration; the critical role of the Multnomah County Circuit Court; implementing the Title IV-E program—a myriad of changes in business practices; why implementation is so monumental; innovation in action—Youth Villages Intercept Model; programs and services to be funded in the upcoming fiscal year by Title IV-E; recommendations for Title IV-E implementation; Administration for Children and Families (ACF) regions; child welfare placement authority; three components of a Title IV-E Administrative Claim; definition of a reasonable candidate; court orders and case plans; and benefits for your department.
New in the Library
Correctional Populations in the United States, 2013
Posted: 3 days ago
(2014) This report presents "statistics on offenders supervised by adult correctional systems in the United States at yearend 2013, including offenders supervised in the community on probation or parole and those incarcerated in prison or local jail. The report provides the size and change in the total correctional population during 2013. It details the slowing rate of decline in the population since 2010 and the downward trend in the correctional supervision rate since 2007. It also examines the impact of changes in the community supervision and incarcerated populations on the total correctional population in recent years. Findings cover the size of the male and female correctional populations and compare the rates of change in the populations by correctional status since 2000. Appendix tables provide information on other correctional populations, including prisoners under military jurisdiction, inmates held by correctional authorities in the U.S. territories and commonwealths, and jail inmates held in Indian country facilities, and estimates of the total correctional population by jurisdiction and correctional status." Some highlight include: an estimated 6,899,000 persons were under the supervision of adult correctional systems at yearend 2013, a decline of about 41,500 from yearend 2012; all of the decline in the correctional population during 2013 resulted from decreases in the probation (down 32,100) and local jail (down 13,300) populations; About 1 in 35 adults (2.8%) in the United States was under some form of correctional supervision at yearend 2013, unchanged from 2012; and about 1 in 51 adults was on probation or parole at yearend 2013, compared to 1 in 110 adults incarcerated in prison or local jail.
New in the Library
ADAM II 2013 Annual Report
Posted: 3 days ago
(2014) The prevalence of drug use in the male arrestee population is determined by the Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring Program II (ADAM II). The major drugs monitored are marijuana, crack and powder cocaine, heroin and other opiates, and methamphetamine. Four sections follow an executive summary: ADAM II overview; the ADAM II sample; drug use and drug market activity among arrestees; and summary and conclusions. The most commonly detected drug was marijuana followed by cocaine metabolites.
New in the Library
Girls, Status Offenses and the Need for a Less Punitive and More Empowering Approach
Posted: 4 days ago
(2013) “’Why are girls so much more likely than boys to be petitioned and incarcerated for a status offense?’ This brief explores the complex answer to this question, and previews steps that can be taken to unravel, understand, and better address the complex needs of girls who engage in status offense behaviors” (p. 1). This is an excellent resource for people who work with girls who are status offenders. Sections of this publication cover: the prevalence of status offenses for girls; how different expectations of girls lead to a double standard; the need for gender-responsive services; defiance or self-defense; girls, structural racism, and implicit bias; the pathways girls take into the juvenile justice system are different from boys—they need different interventions not the same ones for boys painted pink; judicial leadership in Nevada; moving toward a less punitive and more empowering approach; and implications for further juvenile justice reform.
New in the Library
Justice Reinvestment Initiative State Assessment Report
Posted: 5 days ago
(2014) “States across the country are increasingly seeking cost-effective and evidence-based strategies to enhance public safety and manage their corrections and supervision populations. One such effort emerged in the mid-2000s, when several states experimented with a criminal justice reform effort built on a foundation of bipartisan collaboration and data-driven policy development. This model—justice reinvest-ment—yielded promising results, supporting cost-effective, evidence-based policies projected to generate meaningful savings for states while maintaining a focus on public safety. In response to these early successes, Congress appropriated funds to the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) to launch the Justice Reinvestment Initiative (JRI) in 2010 in partnership with the Pew Charitable Trusts (Pew). The initiative formalized the process and provided both financial support and in-kind technical assistance for states to engage in this work. This report describes the JRI model and the experiences and interim outcomes in 17 participating JRI states: Arkansas, Delaware, Geor¬gia, Hawaii, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Caro¬lina, South Dakota, and West Virginia” (p. 1). Sections following an executive summary include: introduction; the JRI Model described; population and cost drivers and responses; projected and preliminary outcomes; reinvestment; challenges; and concluding remarks and implications. The appendix provides case studies of the 17 participating states.
New in the Library
Health Coverage and Care for Youth in the Juvenile Justice System: The Role of Medicaid and CHIP
Posted: 5 days ago
(2014) "This brief provides an overview of the health and mental health needs of girls and boys in the juvenile justice system and the role of Medicaid in addressing those needs. It focuses on the circumstances of those girls and boys who are placed in juvenile justice residential facilities, the discontinuity of Medicaid coverage for those youth, and the options for improving coverage, continuity of care and access to needed services post-discharge, including new opportunities provided by the Affordable Care Act" (p. 1). Sections of this publication cover: profile of youth in the juvenile justice system; types of juvenile justice residential placements; health needs of girls and boys in the juvenile justice system; health services for youth in juvenile justice residential placements; the roles of Medicaid and the Children's health Insurance Program (CHIP); and key issues looking forward. Also includes are these appendixes: "Girls and Boys in the Juvenile Justice by State, 2010" (table); "Girls Health Screen (GHS)"—description; and "Origins of Medicaid's Inmate Exclusion".
New in the Library
Juvenile Delinquency Probation Caseload, 2009
Posted: 6 days ago
(2012) Information regarding the probation caseload for juvenile delinquents from 1985 to 2009 is provided. Results show that: one-third of all delinquency cases received probation as the most serious disposition; probation can be court ordered or voluntary; white youth and males were placed the most on probation; and the greatest offense profile for juvenile probationers were property crimes.
New in the Library
Mindfulness Meditation in American Correctional Facilities: A "What Works" Approach to Reducing Reoffending
Posted: 10 days ago
(2014) This article explains why mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) can be effective in offender rehabilitation and reduce recidivism. Sections address: the program structure of MBIs in correctional settings in the U.S.; findings from controlled research studies in U.S. prisons; mindfulness as a reoffending reduction strategy resulting in improved "inmate levels of negative affect; substance use and drug-related self-control; anger and hostility; relaxation capacity; and self-esteem and optimism" (p. 50); and integration and rollout issues.
New in the Library
Women in the Criminal Justice System: Towards a Non-Custodial Approach
Posted: 10 days ago
(2013) "The past decade has seen dramatic changes in relation to the profile of women in prison in Ireland, one of the most profound being the doubling of the numbers of women imprisoned. Unfortunately, such changes have not been accompanied by advancements in the way in which the criminal justice system deals with women offenders. On the contrary, the conditions for many women prisoners in Ireland have deteriorated, while community-based alternatives for women offenders remain underexplored" (p. 2). This position paper discusses the hardships faced by women in the Irish criminal justice system is explained while it also offers two evidence-based recommendations to address these challenges. Eight sections comprise this report: seven key messages; women prisoners—a growing population; complex needs among women prisoners; women prisoners with caring responsibilities; challenges facing women leaving prison; towards a community-based approach; models of good practice; and conclusions and recommendations.
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News
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Important corrections news and announcements.
Corrections News
In the News: Ireland’s Strategy for Women Offenders
Posted: 6 days ago
A recent article in the Village, an Irish publication, discusses the approach the Irish Prison Service is taking toward their increasing population of women offenders. Imprison fewer women highlights limitations in both current facilities and incarceration alternatives for a largely non-violent female population. From the article: Between 2005 and 2010, there was a dramatic 87% increase in the number of women committed to prison in Ireland. On average, only about 3-4% of the total prison population are women. Because women only make up a small minority of the prison population, conditions in women’s prisons tend to be overlooked in the formation and application of penal policy. The Probation Service and Irish Prison Service have launched a Strategy for 2014-16, entitled ‘An Effective Response to Women who Offend’, which sets out how the two agencies will work together with other statutory, community and voluntary sector partners to reduce offending and imprisonment rates amo
Corrections News
Mental Health Webinar: The Court’s Role in Solving Mental Health Issues in the Criminal Justice System
Posted: 6 days ago
In collaboration with the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the National Criminal Justice Association, and the Arizona Criminal Justice Commission, the Justice Clearinghouse is sponsoring a no-cost webinar to all public safety stakeholders on effective strategies to investigate, respond to, and approach individuals with mental health issues. All are free to attend. From the event announcement: Webinar DescriptionIndividuals with mental illness enter the criminal justice system on a repeat basis. What are courts doing to stop the cycle? Should courts get into the business of coordinating mental health treatment for those involved in the criminal justice system? The presenter in this webinar will discuss these questions in the context of the multitude of mental health court models in operation across the country. Mental health court models vary by the point of entry into the criminal justice system, the agencies invested in the program, and who the program serves. There is a trend acros
Corrections News
Women in Prison: Comparing the U.S. and Britain
Posted: 13 days ago
Although the number of women in the prison systems are different, the issues surrounding incarcerated women in both the U.S. and Britain have many similarities. Highlighting those similarities are two reports: Ten Truths that Matter when Working with Justice Involved Women by the National Resource Center on Justice Involved Women and Women in prison: the cycle of violence by the British Open Democracy. Several key points from the reports are outlined in the chart below. United States Britain Prison Population 111,300* 3,959 Type of Offense Typically commit non-violent crimes 81% committed non-violent offenses Risk Women pose a lower public safety risk than men Many women offenders do not pose a significant risk of harm to public safety Drug Use 60% drug dependence or abuse in year prior to incarceration 68% drug use at time committed Physical or Sexual Violence Nearly 6 in 10 women in state prisons had experienced physical or sexual abuse
Corrections News
NIC Virtual Conference: Call for Presentations
Posted: 19 days ago
The NIC Academy Division is currently accepting proposals to present workshops for the NIC Virtual Conference 2015: New Directions in Corrections. The Conference will go live June 10, 2015 from 9:00 AM MT to 2:00 PM MT. Join your colleagues as we learn together about current trends and issues in corrections, cutting-edge work in corrections, research-informed programs, and thought-provoking inspirational innovations that promote the best in corrections. The 2015 Virtual Conference will have an emphasis on the topic of Correctional Staff Wellness. However, a variety of topics are encouraged and examples include: undocumented immigrants, racial disparity in offender population and effects of privatization. Submission Deadline: February 10, 2015 Download details for submitting presentations here
Corrections News
Penal Reform International – Focused on Women in the Criminal Justice System
Posted: 20 days ago
Penal Reform International (PRI) is an independent non-governmental organization working to develop and promote “fair, effective and proportionate responses to criminal justice problems worldwide”. A key priority for PRI is specifically related to women in the criminal justice system and the promotion of non-custodial alternatives for women, as well as incorporating gender-sensitive policies. They address issues around domestic violence, sexual abuse, sex trafficking, children and parental incarceration. Resources found on the PRI website include: No escape from violence: childhood abuse, offending, and women in prison (podcast and blog) The “Bangkok rules” – United Nations rules for the treatment of women prisoners and non-custodial measures for women offenders And key facts, standards, briefings, and other resources on justice-involved women. ------------------------------------------------------------- This announcement is available at NIC s Gender-Responsive News fo
Corrections News
Join the Webinar: Safeguarding Children of Arrested Parents during Investigative and Tactical Operations
Posted: 26 days ago
Participate in this free webinar, Safeguarding Children of Arrested Parents during Investigative and Tactical Operations, hosted by International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) and in collaboration with the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA). Panelists will discuss the potential risks to children of arrested parents during investigative and tactical operations, and will provide strategies and best practice recommendations for law enforcement to mitigate these risks. Resources will be provided to assist law enforcement agencies in developing and implementing a policy to safeguard children during these operations. Presentations will include: An overview of the impact of parental arrests on children, whether or not they are present at the time of arrest A discussion of the development and implementation of model protocols to protect children during investigative and tactical operations Tips and tactics to use during field operations to reduce trauma to children of ar
Corrections News
Infographic: Most States Cut Imprisonment and Crime
Posted: 27 days ago
The PEW Charitable Trusts recently released an infographic comparing changes in the imprisonment rate and crime rate by state over the last five years. As the data shows, although the relationship between incarceration and crime is complex, states can reduce both at the same time. Highlighted statistics: In the 33 states where imprisonment rates decreased, crime rates fell an average of 13% In the 17 states where imprisonment rates increased, crime rates fell an average of 11% Full article on infographic
Corrections News
PRC Webinars December 2014
Posted: 33 days ago
The National PREA Resource Center (PRC), operated by the National Council on Crime and Delinquency through a cooperative agreement with the Bureau of Justice Assistance recently announced these items and events for December 2014. Check the the PRC website for the most up-to-date information. All are free to attend. From the PRC Website: Upcoming Webinars/Presentations Understanding LGBTI Inmates and Residents Tuesday, December 9, 2014 (3:00–4:30 p.m. EST)) Click here to learn more. Click here to register. Meeting the Youthful Inmate Standard: Implications for Operations, Promising Practices, and the Law Tuesday, December 16, 2014 (2:00–3:30 p.m. EST) Click here to learn more. Click here to register. For additional resources from NIC PREA/Offender Sexual Abuse
Corrections News
Apply Now: Women's Addiction Services Leadership Institute
Posted: 34 days ago
The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) is looking for candidates for the fourth national Women’s Addiction Services Leadership Institute (WASLI). The 2015 WASLI is focused on emerging leaders in women s behavioral health (treatment and prevention). It offers the resources, tools, and inspiration needed by tomorrow s leaders as they continue to grow and develop quality services for women across the United States. The 2015 WASLI associates will be selected through a competitive application process. SAMHSA CSAT sponsors WASLI and covers the following costs for Associates: program materials two in-person training programs, including airfare and lodging costs individualized assessments monthly calls using a toll-free teleconference line. Associates will be responsible for covering the costs of ground transportation, food, baggage fees, and incidentals during their travel. Applications must be received by December 8, 2014. Apply to become a
Corrections News
In the News: Stop Putting Women in Jail
Posted: 34 days ago
A recent article published in The Washington Post discusses the movement in Britain to close women’s prisons and applies that rationale to women’s incarceration in the United States. We should stop putting women in jail. For anything highlights the current state of women’s incarceration and possible alternatives through community interventions. From the article: Women’s incarceration has risen by 646 percent in the past 30 years. The majority are nonviolent offenders with poor education, little employment experience and multiple histories of abuse from childhood through adulthood. Efforts to make prison “work” for women have only perpetuated the growth of the prison industrial complex. State-funded Project Redeploy in Illinois has built upon the evidence that nonviolent offenders are more effectively treated in their communities by diverting 1,376 nonviolent offenders from prison since January 2011, when the program began, through the end of 2013. Read the full article
Older News
Training
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Upcoming training, broadcasts, and e-learning opportunities.
Training Opportunity
Correctional Industries Director's Training
Register Before: July 24, 2015
(Begins September 22, 2015) Correctional Industries Director's Training. Correctional Industry Directors are called upon to provide dynamic and effective leadership which is a critical component in the success of any organization. Expanding leadership knowledge and enhancing leadership skills is the foundation for this training as it helps lay the groundwork for the complex work that must be done in this ever changing and challenging industry.
Training Opportunity
Women Offenders: Developing an Agencywide Approach
Register Before: June 13, 2015
(Begins August 11, 2015) This revised blended learning program, with combined independent and on-site activities will total approximately 40 hours over the course of a year. Incorporated into the course requirements are Blended-learning activities to include a webinar, an organizational readiness survey, independent reading and personalized coaching throughout the year to assist agencies in directing their planned change. On-site activities include a 2.5 day, in-class training at the National Corrections Academy in Aurora, Colorado.
Training Opportunity
National Sheriffs' Institute
Register Before: May 29, 2015
(Begins August 30, 2015) The National Sheriffs' Institute (NSI), sponsored by the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) and the National Sheriffs' Association (NSA), is designed to enhance your leadership skills as you take on the challenges of your first term as sheriff. It is the only executive leadership program designed specifically for first-term sheriffs. It was first developed and delivered in the early 1970s and has changed over the years to meet the evolving needs of first-term sheriffs. The program is held in Aurora, Colorado.
Training Opportunity
Executive Excellence Program
Register Before: March 31, 2015
(Begins May 31, 2015) This 10-month executive development program offers innovative learner-centered and competency-based training for future leaders of corrections agencies.
Training Opportunity
Offender Employment Retention Specialist (OERS) Training
Register Before: March 06, 2015
(Begins May 04, 2015) The OERS training combines motivational interviewing techniques with cognitive behavioral principles to teach practitioners how to increase the offenders’ motivation for change while addressing the thoughts and feelings that negatively impact employment retention and successful reentry.
Training Opportunity
Executive Manager Program in Correctional Health Care
Register Before: March 01, 2015
(Begins May 04, 2015) The goal of this new training is to develop a better-prepared correctional senior-level workforce that is knowledgeable in health care administration. Training topics include: Government regulatory standards; Constitutional requirements and ethics; Strategic planning; Quality improvement; Workforce development; Finances; Contracts; Administration of health care; Mental health, Dental health, Custody needs to know; Keystone/Capstone case.
Training Opportunity
Large Jail Administration
Register Before: February 27, 2015
(Begins May 31, 2015) Managing the operations of a large jail requires a unique set of tools and vision for daily operations that smaller jails cannot emulate. Recognizing the difference, NIC offers Large Jail Administration to address the specific needs of large jails. This 40-hour course focuses on assisting newly appointed jail administrators responsible for the oversight of a jail or jail system with 1,000 or more inmates.
Training Opportunity
Offender Reentry: The Value of Victim Involvement
Register Before: February 18, 2015
(Begins February 18, 2015) This live 3-hour broadcast focuses on the unique opportunities and challenges of including victims in the offender reentry process.
Training Opportunity
Managing Restrictive Housing Populations
Register Before: February 01, 2015
(Begins March 23, 2015) This 40-hour training program focuses on the management of Restrictive Housing populations within the control and jurisdiction of departments of corrections throughout the country. The program explores fundamental issues in programs that attempt to reintegrate violent offenders back into general populations which precludes releasing them directly from maximum confinement back to the community. The program also addresses legal issues surrounding restrictive housing, gang management, prison culture and climate, and classification of restrictive housing offenders.
Training Opportunity
National Sheriffs' Institute
Register Before: January 09, 2015
(Begins April 12, 2015) The National Sheriffs' Institute (NSI), sponsored by the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) and the National Sheriffs' Association (NSA), is designed to enhance your leadership skills as you take on the challenges of your first term as sheriff. It is the only executive leadership program designed specifically for first-term sheriffs. It was first developed and delivered in the early 1970s and has changed over the years to meet the evolving needs of first-term sheriffs. The program is held in Aurora, Colorado.
Full Training Catalog
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