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Recently found corrections resources available online.
New in the Library
Reducing Recidivism in Massachusetts with a Comprehensive Strategy
Posted: 5 days ago
(2016) "This policy brief offers fodder for the state’s Justice Reinvestment leaders as they contemplate the changes necessary to increase the system’s focus on recidivism reduction and achieve results" (p. 2). Sections of this brief cover: key findings; the high cost of recidivism in Massachusetts-- incentive to reform, post-release supervision, step downs, and sentence length; evidence-based reentry strategies—post-release supervision, transitional housing, employment services, substance abuse and mental health, and multiservice reentry; collateral sanctions and criminal records in Massachusetts; how much reentry programs can reduce recidivism; conditions of confinement and recidivism risk; state reentry efforts—comprehensive reentry models (in Minnesota, Michigan, and Maryland), and funding reentry initiatives (justice reinvestment in Arkansas, Hawaii, South Dakota, and pay-for-success financing—California, Massachusetts, New York, and Oklahoma); justice reinvestment and effective supervision; and a five-part reentry plan for reducing recidivism in Massachusetts.
New in the Library
What Works? Short-Term, In-Custody Treatment Programs
Posted: 3 weeks ago
(2014) "Assessing the effectiveness of in-custody treatment programs is essential in the correctional system to appropriately allocate resources and reduce offender recidivism rates. With California passing AB 109, “2011 Public Safety Realignment”, it becomes imperative to understand the characteristics and principles of effective rehabilitation programing. Treatment programs that follow the core principles of the Risk-Needs-Responsivity model are found to be effective and to significantly decrease recidivism rates … The main question is whether jail treatment programs can be effective given the short duration of most jail terms. The transitory population in jails makes it difficult to provide continuous and effective treatment, further indicating the importance of analyzing the effectiveness of short-term, in-custody treatment programs. The authors reviewed the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy, education and vocational programs, substance and alcohol abuse treatment, faith-based, and mental illness treatment programs" (p. 3). Sections following an executive summary cover: effectiveness of in-custody treatment programs-- risk-needs-responsivity (RNR) model, and characteristics and principles of effective treatment programs; cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT); educational and vocational programs; substance and alcohol abuse; faith-based programs; and mental illness.
New in the Library
Fines, Fees, and Bail: Payments in the Criminal Justice System That Disproportionately Impact the Poor
Posted: 3 weeks ago
(2015) "As the use of fixed monetary penalties has increased, many observers have raised concerns about the equity, legality and efficiency of these regressive payments. At the same time, meaningful reforms could increase equity without sacrificing deterrent impacts of these payments or the goal of supporting criminal justice operations … [This document examines] the use and impact of fines, fees and bail, and highlight[s] potential options for reform" (p. 2). Sections cover: what fines, fees, and bail are; fines and fees—rising criminal justice budgets have motivated growth in these, the use and size of fees have increased over time, fines and fees are regressive payments that disproportionately impact the poor, fines and fees impose large financial and human costs on poor offenders, collection of fines and fees is often inefficient, reforming fines and fees could potentially increase both equity and efficiency; and bail—the use and size of bail bonds has increased over time, leading to increased pretrial detention of defendants leading to increased pretrial detention of defendants, bail assignments are regressive, leading to pretrial detention of the poorest rather than the most dangerous defendants, pretrial detention of low risk offenders is costly to taxpayers and defendants, and a number of bail reform options could both increase fairness and reduce pretrial misconduct.
New in the Library
Selecting and Using Risk and Need Assessment
Posted: 3 weeks ago
(2015) "The purpose of this document is to provide Drug Court staff with a concise and current overview of important issues relating to offender risk assessment and to provide a list of recommended contemporary risk instruments. Numerous risk scales are currently used in the United States … to assess static risk factors and criminogenic needs (dynamic risk factors that are related to the client’s propensity for criminal behavior), of which substance abuse is but one. Almost all of these are applied to predict risk post-adjudication" (p. 1). This publication focuses on those recommended and promising risk and needs instruments best for drug courts. Sections of this document include: risk assessment-an overview for drug courts; advantages, limits, and usage or risk assessment approaches in contemporary practice; issues for drub courts to consider in selecting risk instruments; selection criteria and overview of risk assessment instruments; best practice guidelines for integrating risk and clinical measures; summary of recommended and promising risk and need assessment instruments; summary of recommended purpose-specific risk assessment instruments; ten principles for using risk assessment; description of recommended risk instruments—Correctional Offender Management Profiling for Alternative Sanctions (COMPAS), Level of Service-Case Management Inventory (LS/CMI), Post Conviction Risk Assessment (PCRA), the Ontario Domestic Assault Risk Assessment (ODARA), and the Violence Risk Appraisal Guide-Revised (VRAG-R); promising risk instruments—Ohio Risk Assessment System (ORAS)—Pretrial Assessment Tool (PAT) and Community Supervision TOOL (CST), and the Risk and Needs Triage (RANT).
New in the Library
Arts Infusion Initiative, 2010-15: Evaluation Report
Posted: 4 weeks ago
(2015) "In 2010, an ambitious model for social change emerged in Chicago that aimed to connect detained youth and those at risk for incarceration (“at-risk youth”) to rigorous and engaging arts instruction, infused with social and emotional learning goals. Dubbed the Arts Infusion Initiative, the Chicago Community Trust (“the Trust”) spearheaded and funded this five year, $2.5 million demonstration while earning cooperation from the local detention facility, public school system, community policing office, and community arts program leaders to integrate arts programming into youths’ school and after school environments. Since its launch, the Arts Infusion Initiative has served more than 2,000 youth at an average annual cost of $700 per teen, linking them to high performing arts instruction associated with significant increases in social and emotional learning. This report marks the first large-scale evaluation of the Arts Infusion Initiative which was designed to: (1) assess the degree to which the project, as an emergent model for social change, was achieving its intended purposes and (2) generate actionable information for promoting effective Arts Infusion practices while redirecting those that have been less effective" (p. 3). Six chapters comprise this evaluation: introduction; importance of the Arts Infusion Initiative; components of the Arts Infusion Initiative; evaluation methods; seven key findings; and recommendations for promising practices. Two of the key findings are: Arts Infusion youth participants had statistically significant improvements in their social and emotional learning skills; and Arts Infusion programs were successful in "exposing at-risk youth "to new skills and technologies, providing confidence building experiences that opened their minds to a positive future" (p. 5).
New in the Library
Declines in Youth Communities and Facilities in the 21st Century
Posted: 4 weeks ago
(2015) "A major reduction has taken place in the number of teenagers committed to juvenile facilities in this century. At a time of increasing calls to cut the number of incarcerated adults by 50 percent over 10 years, the juvenile justice system has already attained this goal. Moreover, the decline has taken place without harming public safety" (p. 1). Information provided in this report includes: "Figure 1. Juvenile Facilities and Placements, 1997-2013"; "Table 1. Juvenile Commitment Changes by State, 2001-2013"; "Table 2. Juvenile Commitment Rates by State, 2013"; "Figure 2. Youth Commitment Changes by State, 2001-2013"; "Figure 3. Youth Commitment Rate per 100,000 by State, 2013"; racial and ethnic disparities; "Table 3. Black/White Commitment Rates per 100,000 Juveniles, 2011"; one in three juvenile facilities have closed since 2002; "Figure 4. Number of Juvenile Offenders by Size of Facility, 1997-2013"; "Figure 5. Percent of Juvenile Offenders by Size of Facility, 1997-2013"; and concluding remarks. "Reductions in juvenile offending combined with common-sense policy changes have led to large reductions in the number and percentages of teenagers in large state facilities and generally in confinement … Confinement should be used sparingly and briefly, and only as a last resort. For serious offenders, a successful program should be intensive and address teenaged aggression, focusing on rehabilitation to keep them in confinement only as long as they are a threat to public safety" (p. 6-7).
New in the Library
Prison guards and the death penalty
Posted: 4 weeks ago
(2015) This is an excellent primer on how correctional officers are deeply impacted by working on death row. It is essential reading for corrections professionals, policymakers, and the public. Sections of this paper include: introduction; guards on death row; interactions with prisoners; guards at executions; and conclusion. "Like murder, execution inflicts emotional and psychological damage on those linked to it. This can begin with anticipatory trauma when a court sets an execution date and the impact can remain even years after an execution. Prison guards, who most closely interact with condemned prisoners on a daily basis, are particularly affected, including and especially those acting as executioners. The death penalty compounds the anxiety and depression to which prison guards are already especially vulnerable (over a quarter of all US prison employees suffer from depression36 – three times the level in the general US population). Given such negative aspects to the work, executing nations use enticements and punishments to keep guards in execution service … Alternatively, they may try to dissuade guards from quitting by using ridicule, bullying or demotion: one guard was given "weird duty, weird hours" after asking to be removed from the execution team, while others reported being threatened with lower paying, lower status jobs. The exposure of guards to executions and anticipated executions should therefore be a matter of serious concern to prison administrations, which have a responsibility towards the wellbeing of their staff. The unacknowledged stress experienced by guards on death rows and execution teams risks dangerous mental health consequences for them and those around them. The simplest (and best) solution would be to remove the cause of the problem and abolish the death penalty" (p. 3).
New in the Library
Environmental Scan 2015
Posted: 4 weeks ago
(2016) “Beginning in the late 1990’s, the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) Information Center began scanning social, economic, and corrections issues to inform the development of programs and services offered by NIC. This report, now in its 10th edition, has continued to evolve into a popular tool that corrections practitioners also use to inform their work in jails, prisons, and community corrections. Because there are many issues beyond what is addressed in this environmental scan that will potentially influence corrections, this report is intended to give a broad overview of selected current and anticipated trends and not intended to be comprehensive. The method for selecting articles, reports, and other materials was based on a scan of popular magazines, newspapers, and websites as well as corrections-specific publications. As part of the ongoing work of the Information Center in supporting the work of corrections practitioners, staff regularly monitors reports and publications from state, national, and independent sources. The report is arranged starting with global and broader influences on corrections and moves to specific corrections issues. Each section of the report gives an overview of the topic followed by corrections-specific trends and developments in this area” (p. 3). Sections of this report are: introduction; international developments; demographic and social trends; the workforce; technology; public opinion; the economy and government spending; criminal justice trends; corrections populations and trends; and mass incarceration.
New in the Library
Managing the Elderly in Corrections
Posted: 5 weeks ago
(2014) "The elderly offender is still treated as distinctly marginal and remains more or less peripheral to policy and advocacy within most correctional jurisdictions. Where innovative practices have emerged, it is typically because of the local efforts of determined correctional professionals, often in partnership with the voluntary sector. Despite their increasing numbers, elderly offenders have not yet attained visibility as a national or international policy issue in corrections" (p. 18-19). This document discusses issues impacting the managing of senior inmates and offers suggestions on how to meet those challenges. Sections address: the scope of the problem; what is causing this problem of the graying of the prisoner population; the aging prisoner population—significant consequences and possible responses; managing the health care needs of the elderly prisoner; coping and adaptation to prison life for the elderly; types of stressors for the elderly in corrections; supporting the terminally ill and dying elderly in prisons; duties regularly performed by inmate caregivers; reintegration of the elderly offender back to the community; and a framework for best practice programming for the elderly offender. Appendixes include: "'True Grit': Description of a Model Correctional Program for the Elderly Offender"; and "UNODC Recommendations: Handbook on Prisoners with Special Needs".
New in the Library
Video Visitation: How Private Companies Push for Visits by Video and Families Pay the Price
Posted: 5 weeks ago
(2014) This publication explains how video visitation negatively impacts the families of inmates. "While prison advocates have long anticipated the technology that would allow for video visits as a way to increase communication between incarcerated individuals, their family, and community members, it was always envisioned as a supplement to in-person visitation. The reality of incarceration is that many individuals are assigned to units in rural communities, far away from their loved ones, burdening mostly low-income families with travel and lodging expenses far beyond their means. When one’s family does not have a vehicle, lives hundreds of miles away, and simply cannot afford the trip, a visit via video would be welcomed. But advocates always envisioned a choice for families with incarcerated loved ones as to whether or not they would make those sacrifices in order to support them – a choice that should be left in the hands of those with the most stake in the matter. Video-only visitation policies strip away that choice; they are simply another outgrowth of the idea that offering services to prisoners and their families can be commercialized" (p. 2). Sections of this publication include: introduction—significant expense and skyrocketing costs, disruptions to family bonding, removal of management tool, usage difficulties due to digital divide, and privacy violations; the benefits of in-person prison and jail visitation; growing restrictions on in-person visitation at the county level; whether limiting in-person visitation will decrease violence and contraband—a case study of Travis County, Texas—once in-person visitation was eliminated disciplinary infractions and incidents, inmate-on-inmate assaults, and inmate-on-staff assaults have increased significantly; money, money, money; conclusion; and four recommendations.
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News
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Important corrections news and announcements.
Corrections News
National Reentry Week and Victims
Posted: 2 days ago
The impact of reentry on the victim services system is an untapped area of need in corrections and community supervision. In the past two years, NIC has presented workshops on Reentry - the Value of Victim Involvement at several national conferences. NIC also produced an internet broadcast on this topic which was very well received. The broadcast focused on the unique opportunities and challenges of including victims in the offender reentry prodess. By including victims, we can obtain more balanced information about the offender and their offense history which can positively impact reentry decisions. This approach can result in better outcomes for the community, offenders and victims through enhanced offender accountability, increased victim satisfaction, and community safety. In addition, there is a desktop guide in development for use by Probation and Parole Agents to assist them in more effective response strategies when they have contact with victims. It will be introduced o
Corrections News
Roadmap for Reentry from the U.S. Department of Justice
Posted: 3 days ago
National Reentry Week April 24-30, 2016 National Reentry Week Fact Sheet In 2011 the Department of Justice (DOJ) established the Federal Interagency Reentry Council. The Reentry Council, a Cabinet-level group that includes 20 federal departments and agencies, is committed to coordinating reentry efforts and policies. In a continued effort to support that work, this week Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch announced the Roadmap to Reentry. The Roadmap outlines the five principles that the Federal Bureau of Prisons will use as guidelines to improve correctional practices and programs. The Five Principles are: Principle I: Upon incarceration, every inmate should be provided an individualized reentry plan tailored to his or her risk of recidivism and programmatic needs. Principle II: While incarcerated, each inmate should be provided education, employment training, life skills, substance abuse, mental health, and other programs that target their criminogenic needs and maximize their l
Corrections News
Reentry TIPSHEETS for Women
Posted: 3 days ago
The series, Reentry TIPSHEETS for Women, is designed to help correctional staff and other supportive stakeholders, who are working with women during the pre-release planning process and during reentry to address their needs as they transition to the community. The TIPSHEETS are an important resource for staff to use as a component of their ongoing discussions with the woman during her reentry planning process, and as a reminder of discussions and plans that have been identified during her period of incarceration. They are not intended to be handouts merely given to women on their way out the jail or prison door. Of necessity the Reentry TIPSHEETS for Women cover each topic generally and provide links to national resources. They will be most helpful when they can be paired with specific, on-the-ground resources that are available in the communities where each returning women lives. The twelve TIPSHEETS in the series include: Career Exploration and Training Tipsheet: Discover Your
Corrections News
Reentry E-Learning Courses – Workforce Development for Justice-Involved Individuals
Posted: 3 days ago
Available on the NIC Learning Center, the Community Services Division has developed a series of seven e-courses that address competencies required to provide effective workforce development services for justice-involved individuals. The series, entitled Workforce Development for Justice-Involved Individuals, includes the following courses: Career Development Theory and Its Application presents foundational and theoretical perspectives of career development. The course focuses on four types of theories: trait-and-factor, developmental, transition, and learning. It also includes instruction on assumptions underlying the theories and practical application of the theories in working with justice-involved individuals. Strategies to Lessen Barriers for Justice-Involved Individuals Entering the Workforce gives strategies to address barriers to employment and job retention. The course provides instruction on how to identify internal and external barriers, assess those barriers using the
Corrections News
NIC’s Justice Involved Women’s Initiative
Posted: 4 days ago
National Reentry Week April 24-30, 2016 NIC s work over the years with justice involved women incorporates evidence based, gender informed research that continues to emerge in several critical areas. The emergence of evidence based practices was a turning point in correctional work, but the addition of gender-informed research and knowledge from that body of work directs us to sharpen our practices with women. Two earlier and significant initiatives built the foundation for NIC s gender responsive work. The findings from them continue to inform the gender responsive products that NIC makes publicly available. They are: 1) Gender Responsive Strategies: Research, Practice, and Guiding Principles for Women Offenders- This study and resulting document identified six principles that remain the cornerstone of working with women. 2) Women s Risk and Need Assessment (WRNA)--A series of tools developed from extensive construction and validation research conducted entirely with samples
Corrections News
Register Now – Webinar on Medication Assisted Treatment Programs
Posted: 5 days ago
The Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) invites you to participate in a Webinar on Medication Assisted Treatment Programs for Justice Involved Populations on Tuesday, April 26, 2016 from 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm. The webinar will highlight examples of Medication Assisted Treatment programs for individuals with opioid use disorder in correctional facilities, and in reentry programs in three states: California, Connecticut, and Massachusetts. Opening remarks will be delivered by ONDCP Director Michael Botticelli followed by an introduction on the BJA Residential Substance Abuse Treatment (RSAT) Technical Assistance services. Date/Time: Tuesday April 26, 2016 12:00 pm 1:00 pm EST To register for the webinar, please go to http://ems6.intellor.com?do=register t=2 p=601251 For technical assistance, please contact Karen McHugh at kmchugh@ondcp.eop.gov or call (202) 395-6772. Download webinar agenda
Corrections News
The Reentry Challenge
Posted: 1 week ago
by Jim Cosby, Director, National Institute of Corrections National Reentry Week is April 24-30, 2016 America is the land of second chances, George W. Bush once said. The difference between making that statement and ensuring that people have the opportunity for second chances is what reentry is all about. It is no secret that the United States has the largest prison population and the second highest per capita incarceration rate in the world. An important effort in reducing that population is ensuring that individuals who are released to the community do not return to incarceration. This means investing in programs and policies that promote successful reentry and reduce recidivism. To encourage this important work, the U.S. Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch named April 24-30, 2016, as National Reentry Week. There will be many reentry related activities during this week that will help increase visibility of this important topic and hopefully raise public awareness. Thank
Corrections News
Register Now - Corrections Stress: Peaks and Valleys Live Internet Broadcast!
Posted: 1 week ago
Corrections Stress: Peaks and Valleys Register Online for this Live-Streaming Internet Broadcast at http://nicic.gov/training/ib201606 June 22, 2016 at 9am PT / 10am MT / 11am CT / 12pm ET. A live-streaming internet broadcast on the impact of operational stress and traumatic experiences on corrections professionals. All of life is peaks and valleys. Don t let the peaks get too high and the valleys too low. - John Wooden, Former Head Coach, UCLA Bruins Staff is the life blood of any agency and its most valuable resource. Their wellness is paramount to organizational health and mission effectiveness. What can individuals and organizations do to identify issues commonly associated with corrections stress and cultivate a climate of staff resilience and agency health, stability and excellence? This three-hour broadcast will be live on Wednesday, June 22, 2016 at 9am PT / 10am MT / 11am CT / 12pm ET. During this live event we will: Acknowledge the effects and consequenc
Corrections News
Women in Apprenticeship and Nontraditional Occupations (WANTO) Technical Assistance (TA) Grants
Posted: 1 week ago
The United States Labor Department is offering $1.9M in grant funding to expand apprenticeships and support for women in nontraditional occupations. Those occupations include manufacturing, transportation, energy, construction and information technology. The department will award approximately four grants to community-based organizations to create regional, multi-state Technical Assistance Resource Centers. The centers will support efforts to increase the number of women entering into nontraditional occupations and Registered Apprenticeships. Eligible applicants include community-based organizations capable of establishing technical assistance resources for Registered Apprenticeship programs to assist women to enter nontraditional occupations. People with criminal records can have a difficult time finding employment after release. This is certainly the case with women in the justice system. Many have minimal employment skills that can command a living wage and also have responsib
Corrections News
The Incarcerated and Formerly Incarcerated Women Launch National Council
Posted: 1 week ago
This Friday, April 22, at the National Press Club the National Council for Incarcerated and Formerly Incarcerated Women and Girls will launch a new organization. This Council is the first-ever national organization created and led by incarcerated and formerly incarcerated women and girls. From the press release: The National Council for Incarcerated and Formerly Incarcerated Women and Girls supports the work of incarcerated and formerly incarcerated women and girls who are contributing to changing the criminal justice system by working individually or within organizations. Members support one another by sharing their knowledge and powerful experiences. Council members know firsthand the impact of the current criminal justice policies. We know the realities of incarceration, the many hurdles women face after returning home, and what changes are necessary to shift the system to one based on human dignity and social justice. When: Friday, April 22, 2016, 9:30-11:00 AM Where:
Older News
Training
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Upcoming training, broadcasts, and e-learning opportunities.
Training Opportunity
2016 Virtual Conference - Save the Date! November 9, 2016
Register Before: November 09, 2016
(Begins November 09, 2016) A virtual conference hosted by the National Institute of Corrections.
Training Opportunity
Managing Restrictive Housing Populations
Register Before: July 01, 2016
(Begins September 12, 2016) This 40-hour training program focuses on the management of inmates in Restrictive Housing within the control and jurisdiction of departments of corrections throughout the country. 
Training Opportunity
Orientation for Parole Board Chairs
Register Before: July 01, 2016
(Begins September 27, 2016) Parole board chairs, whether appointed by their governor, elected by their peers, or rotated into their role from their seat on the parole board, are in an influential position to lead efforts to improve and reform the transition and reentry system, as well as enhance their board’s capacity to use evidence-based principles in effective offender management. Being an effective chair requires clearly defined roles and strategies to ensure that informed decisions are made relative to the release and return of offenders.
Training Opportunity
Conducting Security Audits
Register Before: June 30, 2016
(Begins September 12, 2016) With NIC’s hands-on, onsite training, gain the experience of auditing out-of-state institutions of various security levels and missions. This 36-hour training program supplements classroom instruction in auditing protocol with tours of assigned facilities and real-world assignments that put newly trained participants in charge of the auditing process.
Training Opportunity
Orientation for New Pretrial Executives
Register Before: June 24, 2016
(Begins August 08, 2016) Extensive training that enhances the effectiveness of pretrial executives in maintaining and capitalizing existing services.
Training Opportunity
Corrections Stress: Peaks and Valleys
Register Before: June 22, 2016
(Begins June 22, 2016) A live-streaming internet broadcast on the impact of operational stress and traumatic experiences on corrections professionals.
Training Opportunity
National Sheriffs' Institute
Register Before: June 06, 2016
(Begins September 19, 2016) The National Sheriffs' Institute (NSI), sponsored by the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) and the National Sheriffs' Association (NSA), is designed to enhance your leadership skills as you take on the challenges of your first term as sheriff. It is the only executive leadership program designed specifically for first-term sheriffs. It was first developed and delivered in the early 1970s and has changed over the years to meet the evolving needs of first-term sheriffs. The program is held in Aurora, Colorado.
Training Opportunity
Planning of New Institutions
Register Before: June 01, 2016
(Begins August 22, 2016) This 32-hour training program teaches the importance of in-depth planning before starting facility design.
Training Opportunity
National Sheriffs' Institute
Register Before: May 22, 2016
(Begins August 22, 2016) The National Sheriffs' Institute (NSI), sponsored by the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) and the National Sheriffs' Association (NSA), is designed to enhance your leadership skills as you take on the challenges of your first term as sheriff. It is the only executive leadership program designed specifically for first-term sheriffs. It was first developed and delivered in the early 1970s and has changed over the years to meet the evolving needs of first-term sheriffs. The program is held in Aurora, Colorado.
Training Opportunity
New Jail Inspectors Training
Register Before: May 18, 2016
(Begins June 06, 2016) This four-day program is designed to build the knowledge and skills of new detention facility inspectors in their core duties of inspecting, consultation, and technical assistance. In this program participants will examine their role as a detention facility inspector, create a plan for developing positive working relationships with detention officials and other key stakeholders, examine and practice key inspection and consulting skills, plan and carry out a practice inspection and report, review trends impacting detention facilities and standards, and gather contacts, information, and resources for professional development.
Full Training Catalog
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