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Penal Reform International (PRI) (London, England)

"A short guide to the fundamental issues and arguments linked to introduction of alternative sanctions following abolition of the death penalty. It reviews current trends in the application of long-term and life imprisonment, highlighting relevant international and regional human rights standards and provides examples of good practice." Sections cover: the declining use of the death penalty; alternatives to the death penalty—a review of current practices—what a life sentence is, long and determinate prison sentences, indeterminate or reducible life sentences, preventive detention, mandatory and discretionary life sentences, and de facto sentences; the increasing use of "life" and long-term sentences; life imprisonment without the possibility of parole (LWOP); a human rights framework for life and long-term prisoners; use of solitary confinement for life and long-term prisoners; vulnerable life and long-term prisoners; prison management and resources; monitoring prisons where life and long-term prisoners are held; social integration of life and long-term prisoners; life and long-term sentencing practices in PRI countries; and 12 steps toward alternative sanctions to the death penalty.

Alternatives to the Death Penalty Cover

You need to read this document if you work with justice-involved girls. It explains the serious problems faced with girls in the criminal justice system and suggests ways to address these challenges and meet these girls' critical needs. This Briefing Paper is divided in to four sections: introduction—particular issues facing girls involved in criminal justice systems, numbers, and the right to non-discrimination; discrimination in the juvenile justice system—gender-specific offences, access to justice, alternatives to detention, and recommendations for eliminating this discrimination; recommendations for responding to the special needs of girls in detention—protection from violence, access to gender-sensitive healthcare, rehabilitation and reintegration, and access to effective remedy and monitoring; and conclusions. "Treating girls who are offenders and prisoners differently from their male counterparts is not unfair or discriminatory. In fact the reverse is true. Girls who offend and who are in detention have distinctive needs that must be identified and addressed so that they receive treatment that is neither better nor worse than that received by boys, but that is equitable. An important first step for policy-makers is to research and identify the background, characteristics and social reintegration needs of girl offenders and to use this to inform legislation and policies in a gender sensitive way. It is hoped that this paper demonstrates the need for gender specific policies that respond to the needs of girls and that the recommendations it contains can be a source of inspiration for law and policy makers to develop a proportionate and gender-sensitive response to offending by girls" (p. 19).

Neglected Needs: Girls in the Criminal Justice System Cover

"Myths and Realities" provides ‘quick answers to common questions’ about the death penalty … The booklet is interactive in format – allowing readers to read the myth and turn over a flap to discover the reality. We hope it will be a useful guide for activists and advocates of abolition, giving them the arguments they need to tackle common pre- and misconceptions." Some of the 13 realities to the myths are: the death penalty doesn't keep people safer than other sentences; you can never be 100% sure you're killing the right person; nobody can say who deserves to die; the death penalty is not applied fairly--people who are poor, mentally challenges, or from a minority are more likely to get a death sentence; the majority of the public do not want the death penalty; and one is not "soft on crime" if they oppose capital punishment-- the harshest sentence isn't the same as an effective response to crime.

The Death Penalty: Myths & Realities: Quick Answers to Common Questions cover

Individuals who want an up-to-date understanding of gender-responsive issues and all those who work with female offenders should read this document report. It “outlines the risks faced by women deprived of their liberty of being subjected to torture and ill-treatment and measures that can be taken to reduce such risks. The main focus of the paper is the situation of women in detention in the criminal justice system, though the discussion is in many cases equally relevant to women deprived of liberty in other contexts, such as psychiatric institutions and immigration detention facilities” (p. 3). Sections contained in this document include: introduction to gender-specific treatment; why monitoring bodies should look at this issue; concepts—gender and gender mainstreaming, and discrimination and violence against women; risk factors and measures to reduce risk—certain contexts which heighten risk, certain times that heighten risk, certain policies and practices that heighten risk or cause physical or mental suffering, and certain categories of women who are at heightened risk(girls, victims of human trafficking and sex workers, women with mental healthcare needs, and other groups; and the qualities monitoring bodies need to be effective in this endeavor.

Women in Detention: A Guide to Gender-Sensitive Monitoring Cover

Individuals who want an up-to-date understanding of gender-responsive issues and all those who work with female offenders should read this document report. "It outlines the risks faced by women deprived of their liberty of being subjected to torture and ill-treatment and measures that can be taken to reduce such risks. The main focus of the paper is the situation of women in detention in the criminal justice system, though the discussion is in many cases equally relevant to women deprived of liberty in other contexts, such as psychiatric institutions and immigration detention facilities.” (p. 2). Sections contained in this document include: introduction to gender-specific treatment; why monitoring bodies should look at this issue; concepts—gender and gender mainstreaming, and discrimination and violence against women; risk factors and measures to reduce risk—certain contexts which heighten risk, certain times that heighten risk, certain policies and practices that heighten risk or cause physical or mental suffering, and certain categories of women who are at heightened risk (girls, victims of human trafficking and sex workers, women with mental healthcare needs, and other groups); and the qualities monitoring bodies need to engage in this endeavor.

Women in Detention: A Guide to Gender-Sensitive Monitoring|Second edition Cover
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