Back to top

Community-based rehabilitation

Detailed information regarding the use and benefits of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in prisons and jails is provided. Chapters comprising this guide address: the increasing need for effective treatment services; what cognitive-behavioral therapy is; prominent CBT programs for offenders; measuring the effectiveness of rehabilitation programs; evaluating specific CBT curricula; and "real world" program applications.

Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment: A Review and Discussion for Corrections Professionals Cover

The effectiveness of "Thinking for a Change" -- a cognitive behavioral program for adult probationers -- is investigated. Following an abstract, this dissertation contains these chapters: introduction; literature review; study purpose and major aims; method; results; and discussion. While "results for changes and improvements in criminal sentiments found in the present study [are] disappointing and counter to expectation," there are significant positive changes in social skills and social problem-solving (p. 90). More importantly, new criminal offense rates for group completers dropped 33%.

Evaluation of the Efficacy of a Cognitive Behavioral Program for Offenders on Probation:  Thinking for a Change Cover

This presentation is an extended interview with Dr. William Miller regarding the utilization of motivational interviewing (MI) in correctional settings. Topics discussed include:

  • Background of MI
  • MI in corrections
  • How MI works
  • The spirit of MI
  • Implementing MI
  • MI applications and assessment
  • Brief and one-time MI
  • Essentials of MI
  • MI roll-out and training
  • The supervisor’s role
  • MI research
  • And implications for policy makers, supervisors and MI coaches.

The resources contained on the CD-ROM are transcripts of the video presentation and a copy of "Motivating Offenders to Change."

Implementing Motivational Interviewing in Correctional Settings: An Interview with Dr. William Miller Cover

This publication "provides probation and parole officers and other correctional professionals with both a solid grounding in the principles behind MI [motivational interviewing] and a practical guide for applying these principles in their everyday dealings with offenders" (p.2). Seven chapters are contained in this guide: how MI fits in with evidence-based practice; how and why people change; the motivational interviewing style; preparing for change; building motivation for change; navigating through tough times--working with deception, violations, and sanctions; and from start to finish--putting MI into practice.

Motivating Offenders to Change: A Guide for Probation and Parole Cover

Motivational Interviewing (MI) was introduced to the field of corrections in the 1990s through the Evidence-based Practices (EBP) Model as a method for enhancing intrinsic motivation. Since that time, agencies throughout the U.S., in all criminal justice settings, have—to a greater or lesser degree—explored if, when, and how to implement this approach to communicating, building rapport, and tapping into the internal motivation of the clients and staff members they work with. This annotated bibliography contains the written resources pertaining specifically to the criminal justice field. In addition, certain documents considered seminal to the training, implementation, evaluation, coaching, and quality assurance of MI skills are included.

Motivational Interviewing (with a Criminal Justice Focus) Motivational Interviewing Annotated Bibliography Cover

“This study evaluates the efficacy of MI [motivational interviewing] versus RT [relaxation training] in reducing substance use outcomes for incarcerated adolescents and examines the role of depressive symptoms in moderating outcomes.” While MI is shown to be effective in reducing the use of alcohol in adolescents with low and high levels of depression and marijuana use in individuals with low levels of depression, it appears RT is better suited to marijuana-involved adolescents with high depressive symptoms.

Motivational Interviewing for Incarcerated Adolescents: Effects of Depressive Symptoms on Reducing Alcohol and Marijuana Use After Release Cover

The application of evidence-based research findings to the practice of offender supervision is explained. Sections of this manual include: introduction -- supervision as a behavioral management process to reduce recidivism; behavior and change; assessment and planning; communication tools; information tools; incentives to shape offender behavior; service tools; offender types; and guiding principles.

Tools of the Trade Cover
Subscribe to Community-based rehabilitation