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Organizational behavior

Targeted for criminal justice professionals who train, this curriculum demonstrates communication skills that strengthen positive interaction, evaluates the impact of individual cultural perspectives and personal beliefs on the effectiveness of interacting with others, and identifies positive and negative relationships that are impacted by cultural diversity in the work place. Section topics include creating a common understanding, what it means to be different in your organization, communicating across cultures, and development of cultural competency. The training package consists of a one volume, loose-leaf manual and a videotape that depicts numerous vignettes of interactions between people of different ethnic backgrounds. This thirty-six-hour course was delivered to trainers of the Missouri Department of Corrections Central Training Academy, St. Louis, Missouri, June 1-5, 1992.

Cultural Diversity: Training for Trainers Cover

This 16-hour course is designed for managers who run meetings and/or lead task groups. This curriculum is divided into seven modules:

  • Introduction and course overview;
  • What is facilitation;
  • Know yourself and your group;
  • Getting started;
  • Getting work done (task tools);
  • Handling challenges;
  • And completing work.

Lesson plans, Participant's Manual, and overheads are included.

 

Facilitation Skills for Managers: Training Curriculum Package Cover

This 16-hour course explores the skills needed in leading group participants to achieve specific learning goals. The following modules are contained in this curriculum:

  • Introduction and course overview;
  • How we process learning;
  • Predicting and accommodating learner behavior;
  • Setting the climate;
  • Utilizing facilitation strategies for learning;
  • Dealing with conflicts in groups;
  • And presentations.

Also included are copies of overheads used.

 

Group Facilitation Skills for Trainers Cover

Originally broadcast on August 20th, 2020 for one hour.

Webinar Summary : When was the last time you had your eyes examined? Just as the health of our vision is maintained through regular eye exams, the way in which we see the world is maintained through self-awareness and broadening our perspectives. In the midst of quarantines, telework, and increased isolation from both friends and colleagues, we are also living through a time of social unrest. For many people, this time in history has brought new insights into the criminal justice system and interaction across cultures and life experiences.

If you are interested in improving your cultural “eye sight,” this one-hour interactive webinar sponsored by the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) is for you! Our vision for how we view and perceive others is impacted by our individual beliefs, values, and past experiences. In this webinar, we’ll explore preconceptions and techniques that can be used to understand how other people see the world. By gaining insight into your own personal filters, you will be able to engage in difficult conversations and begin to develop a greater sense of awareness and empathy that starts with YOU.

Take Aways:
Prepare to learn how to develop your H.U.E.:

H elp with cultural considerations toward effective communication in corrections;

U nderstand how your preconceptions and values influence your vision;

E nhance your ability to navigate shared experiences.

Speakers:
Alfranda Durr, CEO ALD & Associates LLC
Kari Heistad, CEO Cultural Coach International

Alfranda (Al) and Kari are Certified Diversity and Inclusion Practitioners with 40 plus years of combined experience conducting in-person and virtual training on a wide range of Human Resources, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion topics. Al and Kari have partnered on a popular diversity webinar series covering a wide range of diversity topics. Combined, Al and Kari bring diverse perspectives and ways of seeing the world to their presentations.

 

What’s Your Eye Chart Saying? How Our Beliefs Filter Our Views [Webinar]
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