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Probation & Parole - Probation - Mentally Ill Offenders

The present study examined the effect of mental health and substance abuse diagnoses had on probation officers’ (PO) perception of risk and the impact on their case management decisions.

The present study examined the effect of mental health and substance abuse diagnoses had on probation officers’ (PO) perception of risk and the impact on their case management decisions.

“This guide is organized around policymakers’ common questions about people with mental illnesses under community corrections supervision and the type and effectiveness of strategies designed to respond to this population” (p.3). Sections include: executive summary; introduction; the extent and nature of the problem; strategies to improve outcomes for people with mental illnesses under community corrections supervision; future research questions and implications for policy and practice; and conclusion.

Improving Outcomes for People with Mental Illnesses Under Community Corrections Supervision: A Guide to Research-Informed Policy and Practice Cover

“This report articulates 10 essential elements for all probation interventions that involve people with mental illnesses, regardless of the particular program model” (p. vii). The essential elements are: collaborative planning and administration; defining, identifying, and assessing a target population; designing the initiative and matching individuals to supervision and treatment options; setting conditions of community supervision; developing an individualized case plan; providing or linking to treatment and services; supporting adherence to conditions of community supervision and case plans; providing specialized training and cross-training; sharing information and maintaining confidentiality; and conducting evaluations and ensuring sustainability.

Improving Responses to People with Mental Illnesses: The Essential Elements of Specialized Probation Initiatives Cover

In this four-page policy brief, Nancy Wolff, Matthew Epperson, and Siobhan Fay examine the use of specialized probation units (SPU) to supervise mentally ill offenders.

With the large and growing number of persons with mental illnesses under probation supervision, a form of specialized probation called specialized mental health caseload (SMHC) has been implemented. This study explores the effectiveness of a prototypic SMHC implemented statewide. 

In his 2009 Presidential Address to the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences (ACJS), University of Southern Mississippi criminologist William Wesley Johnson observed that American corrections has gone through three deinstitutionalization movements: the first being probation and parole in the mid- and late-1800s, the second being community-based rehabilitation and "alternative to incarceration" programs between the 1950s and 1970s, and the third being current efforts to move mentally ill offenders from jails and prisons to community-based programming.

In this article, University of Tennessee psychologists Gina Owens, Shannon Rogers, and Allison Whitesell assess mental health symptoms, mental health service use, and barriers to mental health service use experienced by 100 probationers and parolees from two counties in a "southeastern state."

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