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Kamala Mallik-Kane

“This report was designed as a resource for the justice and health fields to: Identify the full range of beneficial information exchanges between the criminal justice and healthcare systems; Provide detail on specific information exchanges within the context of routine criminal justice and health operations; Serve as a guide to policymakers and practitioners seeking to implement information exchange, by offering detail on workflow and implementation issues; and, Offer a “blueprint” to certain specific information exchanges through the development of technical use cases” (p. 13). Sections comprising this document are: executive summary—issue overview, key findings according to beneficial uses by the criminal justice system and by healthcare providers, types of information to be exchanged, and implementation of information exchange, and next steps; background; implementation issues and potential challenges—privacy and consent, technical considerations, cost, and organizational factors like trust and leadership; catalog of beneficial criminal justice and health information exchange—criminal justice and health connections Matrix, and 34 information exchange synopses; implementation scenarios for reentry into the community after incarceration, and community-based treatment with effective criminal justice supervision; and next step recommendations. Appendixes provide: a list of acronyms and abbreviations; contributors; Phase II recommendations; additional implementation challenges information (HIPAA, HITECH Act, and 42 CFR Part 2); related information, standards, and guidelines; and success stories for SMART and WITS, BHIPS/CMBHS, and the Hampton County Sheriff’s Department.

Opportunities for Information Sharing to Enhance Health and Public Safety Outcomes: A Report by the Criminal Justice and Health Collaboration Project, Version 1 Cover

"People leaving prison often return to the community lacking health insurance and thus access to appropriate health care. Many have mental illness, substance abuse, and other health issues that need treatment and compound reintegration challenges. Left untreated, they are at risk of falling into a cycle of relapse, reoffending, and reincarceration. Providing Medicaid coverage upon release has the potential to improve continuity of care that may interrupt this cycle. This report examines whether efforts to enroll people in Medicaid prior to their release from prison are successful in generating health insurance coverage after release. Urban Institute (Urban) researchers analyzed data from Oregon’s pre-Affordable Care Act (ACA) Medicaid program to determine the extent to which released prisoners successfully gained coverage" (p. 1). The results from this study my help your state in ensuring continuity of care for newly released offenders.

Prison Inmates' Prerelease Application for Medicaid Cover
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