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  • 2018 Corrections Environmental Scan

    A screenshot of the Corrections Environmental Scan Website
    2018 Corrections Environmental Scan

    Now in its thirteenth edition, an updated online version of the Corrections Environment Scan is presented for the first time. Renamed the Corrections Environmental Scan in 2017, it continues to evolve into a popular tool that corrections practitioners use to inform their work in jails, prisons, and community supervision.

    The report is arranged into five topics: Population Demographics, Economy, Workforce, Technology, and Statistics, with the special highlighted topic: Criminal Justice Reform. The Corrections Environmental Scan is intended to give a broad overview of the latest news and trends in these topics, from the corrections, domestic and global perspective.

    Web Page
  • Model Practices for Parents in Prisons and Jails: Reducing Barriers to Family Connections

    Model Practices for Parents in Prisons and Jails: Reducing Barriers to Family Connections

    The objective of this document is to detail a set of practices that correctional administrators can implement to remove barriers that inhibit children from cultivating or maintaining relationships with their incarcerated parents during and immediately after incarceration. This handbook contains ten chapters: partnership building; training and core competencies; intake and assessment; family notification and information provision; classes and groups; visitor lobbies; visiting; parent-child communication; caregiver support; family-focused reentry.

    Document
  • Paving the Way: Lessons Learned in Sentinel Events Reviews

    Paving the Way: Lessons Learned in Sentinel Events Reviews

    This report reviews the lessons learned by three forward-leaning teams in their review of a negative criminal justice outcome ("sentinel event") in their jurisdictions. The project represents the next step in NIJ's exploration of the feasibility of using sentinel event reviews as a way to learn from errors in the criminal justice system. See also 029617.

    Document
  • Using Front End Interventions To Achieve Public Safety And Healthy Communities

    Using Front End Interventions To Achieve Public Safety And Healthy Communities

    The symposium highlighted promising law enforcement, prosecutorial, and judicial interventions at the pretrial stage and promoted dialogue among justice practitioners on how front-end interventions could fit within an evidence-based, harm reduction-focused criminal justice framework. As illustrated above, participants at the symposium learned about and considered various alternative approaches to increasing public safety and addressing health issues facing their communities. They also shared their experiences with—and perspectives on—implementing front-end interventions in their own jurisdictions.

    Document
  • Best Practices in the Assessment, Treatment, and Risk Management of Persons Who Have Sexually Offended

    Best Practices in the Assessment, Treatment, and Risk Management of Persons Who Have Sexually Offended

    The assessment, treatment, and risk management of persons who have sexually offended is of considerable interest to a wide variety of stakeholder groups, including legislators and policymakers, court and law enforcement personnel, corrections and community supervision staff, mental health clinicians, victim advocates, and the community-at-large, among others. Many of these stakeholders have expressed concerns regarding the potential for sexual recidivism and other harms posed by offenders released to the community. As a consequence, most jurisdictions have enacted legislative frameworks to manage those risks.

    The past 40 years have been witness to significant growth in our understanding of the dynamics of sexual offending, the people who engage in these behaviors and how best to assess their risk for reoffending, and what treatment and supervision interventions are most likely to result in success. In this context, success may be defined as: (1) greater community safety, and (2) safe and humane reintegration opportunities for offenders returning to the community.

    This report is intended to provide a comprehensive review of best practices in the assessment, treatment, and risk management of persons who have sexually offended. 

    Document
  • Prescription Drugs of Abuse and Misuse in Jails and Prisons [Webinar]

    Prescription Drugs of Abuse and Misuse in Jails and Prisons [Webinar]

    Are you and your agency knowledgeable of commonly abused and/or misused prescription medications in correctional settings? Have you considered prescription drugs which can be used as weapons? If you are interested in learning from pharmacists from the largest correctional system in the United States as well as a state department of corrections, come and join NIC for this interactive one (1) hour webinar!Through a series of interactive activities, including polling and chat, we will explore how the Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) Health Services Division and the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services (DPSCS) is addressing these challenges. Additionally, this webinar is an overview of BOP’s Drugs of Abuse & Misuse Initiative. During the webinar, participants will have the opportunity to hear from pharmacists in BOP facilities and the Maryland DPSCS on how they are addressing this ongoing challenge.

    Webinar
  • The FEPPS Program [Webinar]

    The FEPPS Program [Webinar]

    FEPPS’ provides a rigorous college education for 108 women in Washington Corrections Center for Women, currently leading to an Associates of Arts degree. FEPPS was formed in 2012 at the request of the Women’s Village, a leadership organization formed by women inside WCCW, to collaborate on college education for female prisoners. In addition to offering 28 college courses per year, FEPPS offers academic advising, college readiness coursework, and non-credit enrichment programs which are available to prison staff as well as inmates. Our volunteer faculty, all have whom have an MA or PhD, develop and deliver high-quality courses that meet credit/degree requirements while creatively adapting to the logistical constraints that come with teaching in prison. Over the past three years we have graduated 30 students earning an AA degree. FEPPS is a signature initiative of the University of Puget Sound and we have proposed a bachelor’s degree program for women inside the prison. This session discusses how we have collaborated with the library at the university to provide academic research materials and skills to students inside the prison through a partnership with outside undergraduates and the university librarians, and some of the challenges of creating a college program in prison without access to academic databases.

    Webinar
  • Assessment, Your Library, and Your Collections [Webinar]

    Assessment, Your Library, and Your Collections [Webinar]

    Expanding on Ranganathan’s five laws, we know that libraries are for use and that every library has its community (users). In order to ensure that a library is meeting the needs of its users, the library must be able to assess its services, including its collections, and understand how those are meeting the requirements of its community. This webinar will investigate the assessment activities that a library can utilize to determine the needs of its community, as well as those assessments which can help a library assure that a service is meeting its community’s desires. Specific assessments, which can be completed in any type of environment, will be discussed and examples given.

    Webinar
  • Measuring the Effect of Library Usage [Webinar]

    Measuring the Effect of Library Usage [Webinar]

    Learn about how one university library measured the effects of first-time-college students’ library use on their success outcomes. Apply these same approaches to more confidently measure the effects of library programs on offender outcomes in correctional settings. Using Generalized Propensity Scoring (GPS) and/or Precision Matching (PM) you can hone in how your library program affected your participants and rule out other factors that may have affected the result. For example, you want to measure the effectiveness of a literacy program on preventing first-time offender recidivism while controlling for their background educational level and family income.

    Webinar
  • How To Use Research in Practice [Webinar]

    How To Use Research in Practice [Webinar]

    Webinar held May 30, 2018

    Evidenced based library and information practice (EBLIP) evolved from evidence based medicine two decades ago when a group of health sciences librarians thought that the process they saw doctors using had something to offer librarianship. Since then, EBLIP has shifted and evolved. EBLIP can be used in any type of library to assist with decision-making, aid in developing policy, and support decisions, requests, and procedures. EBLIP is a way of working that incorporates various types of information into decision-making. The benefit of practicing in an evidence based way is that not only can decision-making be improved upon but also it can increase confidence when there is appropriate evidence to support decisions. This webinar will take participants through the steps of EBLIP in such a way that you can begin to incorporate EBLIP into your practice right away. Then, we will look at specific uses of EBLIP and explore how you can incorporate evidence based practice at your own workplace.

    Webinar
  • Law Enforcement Officers Respecting Service, Restoring Honor for Vets in Crisis

    Law Enforcement Officers Respecting Service, Restoring Honor for Vets in Crisis

    This white paper is based on a series of interviews, buttressed by personal observations, of key players in several jurisdictions where law enforcement officers, Veteran Justice Outreach Specialists from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), and community-based agency representatives collaborate to implement approaches to de-escalate veterans in crisis in our communities. These programs are improving public safety. They are creating opportunities for veterans struggling to re-acclimate to civilian life. These traumatized men- and increasingly women- receive the help they need to address mental health issues, such as post-traumatic stress disorder or traumatic brain injury, related to their military service.

    This is the third publication in the National Institute of Corrections justice-involved veterans compendium project. It shares the views of law enforcement programs at several locations across the country, from small towns to large cities, and highlights how each jurisdiction went about creating and implementing teams or programs to improve practices meant to serve veterans who are in crisis.

    Veteran Response Teams are improving outcomes for these veterans and minimizing hostile and sometimes volatile situations for both law enforcement officers and veterans. This paper shares the views of police officers, sheriff’s deputies, corrections professionals, representatives from the VA and other community-based treatment providers, each of whom, in their own words, have stories to tell.

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  • Offender Use of the Library [Webinar]

    Offender Use of the Library [Webinar]

    Webinar held July 18, 2018.

    Dr. Jane Garner will present the details and findings of a recent doctoral study that focused on the experiences of using libraries in prisons from the prisoner perspective. Her presentation will explain the reasons why this study was undertaken, the research methodology and methods, and the major findings. The study found that libraries in prisons can have a positive influence on prisoner education, behavior management, and personal transformations as well as support positive links to communities and families outside prison. The study provides ample evidence of the positive experiences offered by prison libraries. Dr. Garner will discuss the importance of data-driven studies, such as her own in examining and understanding the role of libraries in prisons. Her study demonstrates that prison libraries have the potential to contribute positively to offender outcomes, both during their time in prison, and in their lives upon release, and that these benefits can flow on to the families of prisoners and to the broader community.

    Webinar
  • Working Effectively with the Law Library [Webinar]

    Working Effectively with the Law Library [Webinar]

    Webinar held May 2, 2018

    Blythe will be talking to us about the ways in which the general correctional library and law libraries can partner, the challenges correctional librarians must negotiate daily, and how to streamline correctional library operations. Her presentation covers some of the history of correctional libraries, challenges that these libraries can face, and how librarians can to work to alleviate some of them. Professor Balestrieri listed five actions that correctional library staff can take to combat some of their challenges: Advocacy, Communication, Education, Training and Team Building. Makes reference to court cases Bounds v. Smith, Thornburgh v. Abbot, Lewis v. Casey.

    Webinar
    Streaming Video
  • Preventing and Controlling Hepatitis A in Jails and Prisons [Webinar]

    Preventing and Controlling Hepatitis A in Jails and Prisons [Webinar]

    Join the National Institute of Corrections (NIC), Federal Bureau of Prisons (FBOP) and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) to learn about how current community hepatitis A outbreaks are affecting correctional jurisdictions, and how you can prevent cases from becoming outbreaks in your own facilities.

    Webinar
  • Training from A (Analysis) to E (Evaluation) ‐ Are You Applying the Science of Learning and Performance? [Webinar]

    Training from A (Analysis) to E (Evaluation) ‐ Are You Applying the Science of Learning and Performance? [Webinar]

    This webinar is an overview of NIC’s white paper Training from A to E: Analysis to Evaluation (032740) on learning and performance, and its application to corrections training. During the webinar, participants had the opportunity to engage in activities to apply learning and performance research to the training they analyze, design, develop, implement and evaluate in their own organization. There is a transcript available for the webinar.

     

     

     

     

     

    Webinar
  • Undue Familiarity: Do You Believe You Can Never Be Comprised? [Webinar]

    Undue Familiarity: Do You Believe You Can Never Be Comprised? [Webinar]

    Webinar held April 24, 2019.

    This webinar is meant to instruct correctional staff at every level on best practices and organizational policy related to professionalism between staff and inmates.  Relationships between staff and inmates can start to blur, and in doing so it can put correctional staff in harms way.  This webinar is intended to equip correctional staff with the information needed to examine the precursors of staff and inmate interaction that could lead to harmful and inappropriate acts, up to and including sexual misconduct.

    Webinar presenters explore how staff accountability and responsibility are the two most important factors in protection against inappropriate behaviors.  Presenters look at indicators, red flags, and preventative measures that keep the balance of safety and security in a healthy environment for both staff and inmates.

    Webinar
  • Replication Validation of the Employment Retention Inventory: An Assessment Tool of the National Institute of Corrections

    Replication Validation of the Employment Retention Inventory: An Assessment Tool of the National Institute of Corrections

    This report summarizes findings from the Urban Institute’s replication validation of the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) Employment Retention Inventory (ERI). This study was conducted under NIC Cooperative Agreement Award 16CS04GKU7 to determine the ERI’s ability to identify workforce detachment risks for employed and unemployed justice-involved populations in Indiana, New York, and Massachusetts. This study also examined practitioners’ use of the ERI in diverse community correctional settings.

    From June 2017 to July 2018, 185 employed and 148 unemployed people participated in the study, completing the ERI during check-in meetings with NIC-trained Employment Retention Specialists. Most study participants were living in the community under probation or parole supervision or with a history of justice involvement; others were incarcerated in state prison. ERI baseline responses were quantitatively compared with employment outcomes approximately 3 to 6 months later for all participants. The relationship between employment and recidivism was also examined. Qualitative interviews with ERI-trained professionals provided insight into the instrument’s use in practice

    Items in the ERI showed strong content and construct validity, meaning the tool conceptually covered the key domains related to employment retention, particularly for community-based participants. Predictive validity analyses demonstrated that the ERI yielded “good” and “excellent” performance ratings in predicting unemployment 3 to 6 months later for those in community settings. Analyses of the ERI’s validity for incarcerated participants were insufficient due to small sample sizes. For all participants, bivariate analyses supported a linkage between employment experiences and recidivism. ERI practitioners expressed that the instrument had strong utility and potential for their work.

    Overall, validation analyses coupled with practitioners’ feedback suggests that the ERI, when implemented with motivational interviewing and cognitive behavioral techniques learned through NIC’s Employment Retention Specialist training, could be a useful case management tool for community correctional populations.

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  • Environmental Scan 2017

    Environmental Scan 2017

    Beginning in the late 1990’s, the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) Information Center began scanning social, economic, and corrections issues to inform the development of training programs and services offered by NIC. This report, now in its twelfth edition, and renamed from the Environmental Scan to the Corrections Environmental Scan, has continued to evolve into a popular tool that corrections practitioners use to inform their work in jails, prisons, and community corrections. Because there are many issues beyond what is addressed in this environmental scan that will potentially influence corrections, this report is intended to give a broad overview of selected current and anticipated trends and not to be comprehensive in scope. The methods for selecting articles, reports, and other materials was based on a scan of news sources, websites, and corrections-specific publications. As part of the ongoing work of the NIC Information Center in supporting the work of corrections professionals, staff regularly monitors reports and publications from state, national, global, and independent sources. The report is arranged with the topics: population, demographics, economy, workforce, technology, substance abuse and mental health, healthcare, and crime and recidivism statistics. Each section gives a summary of trends and developments in corrections, and includes national and global perspectives. A new feature debuts the new NIC website and highlights the State Statistics Information page. This web page provides lists of resources related to local, state, and federal statistics displayed to help you see the current state of the corrections industry as of the last set of reported data.

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  • Agenda Jail PIO Network Meeting 2017 [Proceedings]

    Agenda Jail PIO Network Meeting 2017 [Proceedings]

    The Public Information Officer (PIO) plays a vital role in local jails. The public’s perception/misperception of jail operations can influence public safety, funding, elections and numerous other factors. Responding to media inquiries regarding crisis situations is just one of the many roles of the PIO. Building a positive rapport with the media, taking control of your message, and conveying your mission are priority tasks for a PIO. The Jail Public Information Officers Network Meeting provides for the free exchange of ideas and information that allows colleagues to share and learn new strategies. These proceedings highlight the events that happened during this meeting.

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  • Pretrial Release and Probation: What is the Same and What is Different?

    Pretrial Release and Probation: What is the Same and What is Different?

    According to those who study evidence-based teaching methods, comparing and contrasting two different objects, persons, or even fields and disciplines, such as pretrial release and probation, can have one of the greatest effects on learning. Indeed, comparing and contrasting is considered to be one of the earliest ways that we humans begin learning (going back to how we identify things in early childhood) and makes the best use of elements necessary for all effective learning methods, each of which allows us to form relationships between constructs through reasoning. In sum, comparing and contrasting is highly valuable. Nevertheless, there are three prerequisites to any compare and contrast exercise. 

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  • Sustaining Systems Change: Findings from a Transition from Jail to Community Initiative Stakeholder Survey

    Sustaining Systems Change: Findings from a Transition from Jail to Community Initiative Stakeholder Survey

    The TJC Initiative seeks to improve public safety and to enhance the success of individuals returning to the community from local jails through implementation of an innovative, evidence-informed transition models in four key areas: collaborative structures, evidence-based targeted interventions, data and self-evaluation, and sustainability mechanisms and capacity-building. During Phase 1 (2008-2011), the national TJC team tested the TJC model in six learning communities: Davidson County, TN; Denver, CO; Douglas County, KS; Kent County, MI; La Crosse County, WI; and Orange County, CA. During Phase 2 (2012-2015), six additional learning sites joined the TJC Initiative. Respondents of the program credit TJC TA with helping their communities build highly functional collaborations between their jails, other criminal justice agencies and reentry stakeholders; establish or expand evidence-based practices and interventions; enhance foundational capacity to monitor and measure system performance; and reduce recidivism.

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  • A Framework for Evidence-Based Decision Making in State and Local Criminal Justice Systems

    A Framework for Evidence-Based Decision Making in State and Local Criminal Justice Systems cover
    A Framework for Evidence-Based Decision Making in State and Local Criminal Justice Systems

    The Framework describes key criminal justice decisions, evidence-based knowledge about effective justice practices, and practical local and state-level strategies for applying risk and harm reduction principles and techniques.

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  • LGBT: A Personal Story "Becoming Rachel"

    LGBT: A Personal Story "Becoming Rachel"

    NCA video chronicling the transition from male to female of corrections officer Rachel Esters, featuring moderator Bernie Iszler, CPS NIC Academy division. This may be used as a staff training video.

    Mixed Media
  • Adult Pre-Release Handbook: Pre-Release Information for an Informed Re-Entry and a Successful Transition

    Adult Pre-Release Handbook: Pre-Release Information for an Informed Re-Entry and a Successful Transition

    This guide will help offenders in determining where they are at in terms of preparing for release and in creating a plan to succeed once they leave prison. This handbook contains ten chapters: identification; life skills; housing; education; transportation; living under supervision; family; health; money management; and employment.

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  • Barracks Behind Bars

    Barracks Behind Bars Cover
    Barracks Behind Bars

    The purpose of Veterans Treatment Courts is to offer vets with a substance use problem and/or diagnosis of a mental health issue an opportunity to avail themselves of treatment-oriented justice. Based on anecdotal evidence and an increasing accretion of data from the field—in many of the projects funded by the National Institute of Corrections and the Bureau of Justice Assistance—these courts appear to be achieving their goal. They are helping worthy individuals find a degree of redemption while paying their debt to society. They are restoring family relationships, strengthening communities, cutting rates of recidivism and, hence, making communities safer.

    But what of those veterans who are incarcerated, serving a sentence, or awaiting trial or other resolution of the charges against them?

    This paper is the second in the National Institute of Corrections justice-involved veteran compendium project. It illuminates programs in jails across the country and how justice involved veterans have been helped by them. It illustrates the design, development, implementation, and sustainment of initiatives taken by enlightened, pragmatic corrections officials who have set up veteran-specific housing—in pods, dorms, units, wings, or floors—and programming for military veterans.

    Barracks Behind Bars introduces several of the facilities and the men and women whose vision is paying off with reportedly fewer behavioral problems and incidents of violence by incarcerated veterans. This may contribute to a less stressful, safer environment for correctional personnel and facilitates opportunities for assistance from the Veterans Justice Outreach specialists of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, personnel from state and county departments, and volunteers from community and veterans organizations. This white paper shares the views of jail administrators, judges, and formerly incarcerated veterans—each of whom have stories to tell—in their own words.

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  • 2018 National Crime Victims’ Rights Week (NCVRW) Resource Guide

    National Crime Victims’ Rights Week Poster
    2018 National Crime Victims’ Rights Week (NCVRW) Resource Guide

    This annual suite of resources includes a variety of user-friendly sample materials, current statistics, professional artwork, and tutorials—all designed to help you quickly and capably develop and implement public awareness campaigns for NCVRW and throughout the year. This year’s theme—Expand the Circle: Reach All Victims—emphasizes the importance of inclusion in victim services. The theme addresses how the crime victims field can better ensure that every crime victim has access to services and support and how professionals, organizations, and communities can work in tandem to reach all victims.

    Web Page
  • DV/IPV: Domestic Violence/Intimate Partner Violence

    DV/IPV: Domestic Violence/Intimate Partner Violence cover
    DV/IPV: Domestic Violence/Intimate Partner Violence

    “Domestic violence is the willful intimidation, physical assault, battery, sexual assault, and/or other abusive behavior as part of a systematic pattern of power and control perpetrated by one intimate partner against another. It includes physical violence, sexual violence, psychological violence, and emotional abuse. The frequency and severity of domestic violence can vary dramatically; however, the one constant component of domestic violence is one partner’s consistent efforts to maintain power and control over the other. In the United States, an average of twenty people are physically abused by intimate partners every minute. This equates to more than ten million abuse victims annually. Domestic violence affects everyone regardless of age, socio-economic status, sexual orientation, gender, race, religion or nationality and has devastating consequences that last a lifetime. " (p. 2).

    If you are looking for an excellent introduction to domestic abuse and issues related to it, then this annotated bibliography is a great place to start. Citations are organized into the following topical areas: Introduction; General; Assessment Instruments; Community Corrections; Courts; State Statutes; Juveniles; Family Programs; Victim Programs; Victim Programs and Services; Treatment (Perpetrators) ; Safety Planning/Plans; Confidentiality; and Resource Centers.

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  • Critical Issues Impacting Women in the Justice System: A Literature Review

    Critical Issues Impacting Women in the Justice System: A Literature Review

    “In the following, we review the literature relevant to the study of violence and safety in women’s prison. We begin with the demographic and background characteristics of female offenders. The pathways model is then described, which emphasizes the life experiences of women that contribute to criminal behavior. This review will then describe the subcultural elements of women’s prisons that influence vulnerabilities, victimization, and violence. The types and prevalence of violence in women’s prisons, particularly sexual assault, are also summarized. A summary of the National Inmate Survey, a PREA-mandated data collection that measures inmate self-reports is provided. This review then provides a summary of recent research by the authors that examines the context of gendered violence and safety in women’s correctional facilities and results from a project that sought to validate an instrument intended to measure women’s perceptions of safety and violence” (p. 1).

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  • Project Guide: Assessment of Project Status & Technical Assistance Needs

    Project Guide: Assessment of Project Status & Technical Assistance Needs

    A checklist for assessing the Tribe's progress through the facility development process is provided. Activities tracked include team development, planning, programming, site selection, environmental review; consultant selection, design, construction, transition planning and facility activation, and project contact persons.

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  • National Institute of Corrections Training Academy Evaluation Project, 2005-2006: Participant Demographics, Overall Evaluation of Training, and Applicability Ratings NIC Training Academy Evaluation Project, 2005-2006

    National Institute of Corrections Training Academy Evaluation Project, 2005-2006: Participant Demographics, Overall Evaluation of Training, and Applicability Ratings NIC Training Academy Evaluation Project, 2005-2006

    Initial results from the Training Academy Evaluation Project (TAEP) assessing the training offered by the National Institute of Corrections' Academy are presented. Sections of this bulletin are: highlights; research strategy; findings regarding participant demographic and background profile, participants' overall evaluation of training, participants' evaluations of training applicability, and pre/post comparison of perceived applicability; and future directions. Overall, participants rate the training they receive as being of high quality and relevance.

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  • National Institute of Corrections Training Academy Evaluation Project, 2005-2006: Participant Evaluation of Trainers NIC Training Academy Evaluation Project, 2005-2006

    National Institute of Corrections Training Academy Evaluation Project, 2005-2006: Participant Evaluation of Trainers NIC Training Academy Evaluation Project, 2005-2006

    Results from the Training Academy Evaluation Project (TAEP) assessing the training offered by the National Institute of Corrections' Academy are presented. This bulletin discusses how participants felt about individual trainers. Some highlights include: twenty-eight of the 34 trainers received high marks for satisfaction while also receiving an average score of 98% for them to lead classes again. The trainer strength most noted was knowledge of the field (27%), with the trainer weakness most often being insufficient time or hurried pace (10%).

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  • National Institute of Corrections Drug-Free Prison Zone Project: Evaluation Component for Each of Eight State Sites: Final Report

    National Institute of Corrections Drug-Free Prison Zone Project: Evaluation Component for Each of Eight State Sites: Final Report

    Results from projects implementing new strategies for drug interdiction within an institutional setting are presented. This compilation includes findings from final evaluation reports provided by Maryland, California, Kansas, New York, and Florida.

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  • Training Programs for Juvenile Corrections Professionals, June 1, 2004 - May 31, 2005

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    Training Programs for Juvenile Corrections Professionals, June 1, 2004 - May 31, 2005

    Describes the training programs and technical assistance available from the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) Academy Division through an interagency partnership with the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP). Includes application instructions and forms.

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  • Survey of Sexual Violence in Adult Correctional Facilities, 2009–11 - Statistical Tables

    Survey of Sexual Violence in Adult Correctional Facilities, 2009–11 - Statistical Tables Cover
    Survey of Sexual Violence in Adult Correctional Facilities, 2009–11 - Statistical Tables

    These statistical tables present “jurisdiction- and facility-level counts of allegations and substantiated incidents of nonconsensual sexual acts, abusive sexual contacts, staff sexual misconduct, and staff sexual harassment reported by correctional authorities in adult prisons, jails, and other correctional facilities in 2009, 2010, and 2011. Facilities include the Federal Bureau of Prisons, state prison systems, facilities operated by the U.S. military and Immigration and Customs Enforcement, sampled jail jurisdictions, privately operated jails and prisons, and jails in Indian country … In 2011, correctional administrators reported 6,660 allegations of sexual victimization in prisons. Of these, 605 were substantiated based on follow-up investigation. Local jail authorities reported 2,042 allegations, of which 284 were substantiated. About half (51%) involved allegations of nonconsensual sexual acts or abusive sexual contacts of inmates with other inmates, and half (49%) involved staff sexual misconduct or sexual harassment directed toward inmates.”

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  • Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) Toolkit - End the Abuse: Protecting LGBTI Prisoners from Sexual Assault (2014)

    Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) Toolkit: End the Abuse - Protecting LGBTI Prisoners from Sexual Assault Cover
    Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) Toolkit - End the Abuse: Protecting LGBTI Prisoners from Sexual Assault (2014)

    “A prison or jail sentence should never include sexual assault. On May 17, 2012, the Department of Justice released the final federal regulations implementing the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA). These regulations apply to federal, state and local correctional facilities and lock-ups and include key protections for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex (LGBTI) individuals. Despite— or likely because of—the decade-long process leading up to the passage of the final regulations, much confusion remains about how PREA’s protections can be leveraged to protect LGBTI individuals from sexual assault. This four-part toolkit is designed for advocates both in and outside of correctional settings to use PREA’s requirements to end the abuse of LGBTI individuals. As federal, state and local agencies reassess their policies and practices to come into compliance with PREA, there will be key opportunities to make important policy changes that will impact all individuals in confinement settings.” (p. ii). Part One “Advocacy Guide”—sections addressing documenting violations, policy and legislative change, and key LGBTI issues to monitor in custodial settings. Part Two “Overview”—sections covering what PREA is, whether LGBTI individuals are particularly vulnerable in prison, jail and juvenile detention, whether the PREA regulations include protections for LGBTI individuals, and how facilities should protect LGBTI individuals from abuse. Part Three “Know Your Rights” sections explaining what PREA is, PREA regulations apply to all the prisons and jails, how PREA protects LGBTI individuals, and what one can do if the facility holding them is not following PREA. Part Four “Regulations” containing the full text of key LGBTI provisions.

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  • Sexual Victimization Reported By Adult Correctional Authorities, 2009–11

    Sexual Victimization Reported By Adult Correctional Authorities, 2009–11 Cover
    Sexual Victimization Reported By Adult Correctional Authorities, 2009–11

    This report presents “counts of nonconsensual sexual acts, abusive sexual contacts, staff sexual misconduct, and staff sexual harassment reported to correctional authorities in adult prisons, jails, and other adult correctional facilities in 2009, 2010, and 2011. An in-depth examination of substantiated incidents is also presented, covering the number and characteristics of victims and perpetrators, location, time of day, nature of the injuries, impact on the victims, and sanctions imposed on the perpetrators … Correctional administrators reported 8,763 allegations of sexual victimization in prisons, jails, and other adult correctional facilities in 2011, a statistically significant increase over the number of allegations reported in 2009 (7,855) and 2010 (8,404) … About half of all allegations (51%) involved nonconsensual sexual acts (the most serious, including penetration) or abusive sexual contacts (less serious, including unwanted touching, grabbing, and groping) of inmates with other inmates. Nearly half (49%) involved staff sexual misconduct (any sexual act directed toward an inmate by staff) or sexual harassment (demeaning verbal statements of a sexual nature) directed toward inmates.”

    Mixed Media
  • Technical Assistance, Information, and Training for Adult Corrections: All Corrections Disciplines, Jails, Prisons, [and] Community Corrections [Service Plan: October 1, 2009 - September 30, 2010]

    Technical Assistance, Information, and Training for Adult Corrections: All Corrections Disciplines, Jails, Prisons, [and] Community Corrections [Service Plan: October 1, 2009 - September 30, 2010] Cover
    Technical Assistance, Information, and Training for Adult Corrections: All Corrections Disciplines, Jails, Prisons, [and] Community Corrections [Service Plan: October 1, 2009 - September 30, 2010]

    The National Institute of Correction's (NIC's) Service Plan for fiscal year 2010 contains opportunities available to those working in local, state, and federal corrections. Programming, information services, the NIC Learning Center, technical assistance, distance learning via satellite/Internet broadcasts, NIC training programs at the National Corrections Academy in Aurora (CO), NIC-paid training beyond Aurora (CO), and partnership programs are described.

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  • A Review of the Jail Function Within State Unified Corrections Systems

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    A Review of the Jail Function Within State Unified Corrections Systems

    A state unified system is one in which there is an integrated state-level prison and jail system. This document describes the provision of jail services in the six states that have such a system. The first part examines commonalities and differences in the ways the systems operate, and part two presents a profile of each state's corrections system and its jail function within the system. The six states are: Alaska, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Rhode Island, and Vermont.

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  • 2016 NIC Learning and Performance Symposium: Interactive Instruction Ignites Learning Proceedings Document

    2016 NIC Learning and Performance Symposium Cover
    2016 NIC Learning and Performance Symposium: Interactive Instruction Ignites Learning Proceedings Document

    This Proceedings Document reflects all the key content and activities of the three-day 2016 NIC Learning and Performance Symposium attended by approximately 100 corrections professionals from all disciplines including prisons, jails, community corrections and juvenile justice.

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  • Proceedings of the Large Jail Network Meeting: September 2017

    Proceedings of the L.J.N. Meetings Cover
    Proceedings of the Large Jail Network Meeting: September 2017

    Presentations: “Mental Health Inmate Management—Texas Initiative” (1) “Jails and the Sandra Bland Act” by Dennis D. Wilson and (2) “How to Be a Force Multiplier” by Kelly Howell; “Heroin Epidemic—M.A.T. Model in Franklin County, Ohio” by Geoff Stobart; “Addressing Staff Wellness” by Elias Diggins, Jacob Matthews, and Sonya Gillespie-Carter; “Immigration Screening” by Clint Haggard; “Legal Updates” by Carrie L. Hill. Open forum (short discussions): Inmate Art Programs, Cell Improvements to Reduce In-Custody Suicide, Preparations for Civil Disturbances, Medical Care Vendor RFPs and Selection, Recruitment and Overtime, Restrictive Housing and Tier Time, Inmates and Yoga, Housing to Manage Gang Members, Mental Health Care for Veterans, Alternative Shifts, Canine Detection of Contraband, Background Checks for Medical Providers, COs Equipped with NARCAN, Use of Long-Range Acoustic Devices. There were updates from the NSA, NCCHC, AJA, ACA, NIC, and LJN. Included with the proceedings are the final meeting agenda, participant list, and index of meeting topics.

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  • Stronger Together

    Stronger Together Cover
    Stronger Together

    This collection of handbooks is an excellent resource for anyone who cares for or works with children who have incarcerated parents. These “handbooks include information, tools, and resources, as well as vignettes and quotes to illustrate real-life examples. They are written for a diverse and broad audience who significantly touch and influence children’s lives, including caregivers of all kinds, professionals, volunteers, family members, and other caring adults. While the handbooks focus on children and the criminal justice system in New York State, they are designed to be helpful for those in other states as well.” “Volume I: The Experiences of Children of Incarcerated Parents” by Margaret Brooks, Elizabeth Gaynes, Tanya Krupat, Dana Lemaster-Schipani, and John Hunt covers what is known about these youth, their common feelings and emotions, criminal justice system stress points, individual experiences, diverse responses, and what you can do. “Volume II: Maintaining and Strengthening Family Ties for Children of Incarcerated Parents” by Elizabeth Gaynes, Tanya Krupat, Dana Lemaster-Schipani, and John Hunt discusses why relationships between children and their incarcerated parents need to be maintained, supporting positive visiting experiences for these children, the power of conversation, and facilitating communication between children and their incarcerated parents. “Volume III: Information for Non-Parent Caregivers of Children with Incarcerated Parents” by Gerald Wallace, Rachel Glaser, Michelle Rafael, Lynn Baniak, Tanya Krupat, Dana Lemaster-Schipani, and Elizabeth Gaynes provides background information about non-parent caregivers, and explains how kin become caregivers, custodial arrangements—a caregiver’s options, visiting and co-parenting, financial assistance, and health care, educational assistance, child care, and other services.

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  • Correctional Industries Programs for Adult Offenders in Prison: Estimates of Benefits and Costs

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    Correctional Industries Programs for Adult Offenders in Prison: Estimates of Benefits and Costs

    Results of a cost-benefit analysis of correctional industries programs are provided. Sections of this report are: research methods; research results; benefits and costs; and conclusion. "We find that correctional industries programs for adult offenders in prison can achieve a statistically significant reduction in recidivism rates, and that a reasonably priced program generates about $6.70 in benefits per dollar of cost (p. 2)."

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  • Meeting the Challenge in Correctional Mental Health Care: The Prison Experience [Videoconference Held June 19, 2002]

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    Meeting the Challenge in Correctional Mental Health Care: The Prison Experience [Videoconference Held June 19, 2002]

    Information regarding cooperation between correctional agencies and mental health authorities to ensure continuity of care and adequate treatment for offenders with mental illness or mental health problems is provided. Participants will learn about: the scope of the problem concerning mental illness in prison; innovative program strategies and best practices; the value of early planning for community re-entry; and approaches for determining program efficacy.

    Video
  • Transition from Prison to Community: Making It Work [Satellite/Internet Broadcast]

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    Transition from Prison to Community: Making It Work [Satellite/Internet Broadcast]

    Public safety is everyone's business. This year, 600,000 offenders will leave prison and return to our communities. Whether released offenders live as law-abiding citizens or return to criminal behavior is largely dependent on the preparations made for their release while in prison and their transition process from prison to the community. Many jurisdictions have embraced NIC's Transition from Prison to Community (TPC) Model to increase public safety, support a successful transition process, and utilize scarce taxpayers dollars more effectively. The TPC Model involves community organizations and partnering agencies in creating system change that holds offenders accountable and supports their success in the community. This 3-hour program, originally broadcast September 28, 2005, focuses on the TPC implementation experiences of two states - Missouri and Michigan. Panelists will discuss their experiences with and insights to implementing the reentry model. The goals of this broadcast are for participants to: * Understand the importance of offender transition from prison to community from a variety of perspectives. * Understand the primary elements of the TPC model and the key principles underlying the model's approach. * Understand the key steps in the process of designing and implementing a more effective approach to transition from prison to community.

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  • Foundation Skills for Trainers: 32-Hour Training Program [Videoconference Held March 22-25, 2004]

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    Foundation Skills for Trainers: 32-Hour Training Program [Videoconference Held March 22-25, 2004]

    This 32-hour program will help participants develop the preparation, presentation, and platform delivery skills needed to conduct training using established curricula. Focus areas include the needs and characteristics of adult learners, learning styles, the role of the correctional trainer, managing a learner-centered training environment, asking and responding to questions, facilitating lesson plans, teaching to performance objectives, and basic teaching methods.

    Video
  • Juvenile Justice: Annotated Bibliography

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    Juvenile Justice: Annotated Bibliography

    Are you looking for a comprehensive list of resources about juvenile justice? Then this publication is for you. It offers a wide range of sources that will give you an excellent review of the field of juvenile justice. Each annotation explains what the item is about, with many having Web links. Citations are organized into the following areas: courts; juvenile assessment; assessment tools; programs; programs for young women; facilities; training; websites; and juvenile sex offenders.

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  • Implementing Evidence-Based Practice in Community Corrections: Quality Assurance Manual

    Implementing Evidence-Based Practice in Community Corrections Cover
    Implementing Evidence-Based Practice in Community Corrections: Quality Assurance Manual

    "This manual provides a simple and straightforward approach to implementing evidence-based practice" (p. 3). This manual explains: quality assurance plan development; peer review; quality assurance indicators; customer satisfaction; program evaluation; and individual performance measurement. Samples of pertinent forms are also included.

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  • Virginia Pretrial Risk Assessment Instrument (VPRAI)

    Virginia Pretrial Risk Assessment Instrument Cover
    Virginia Pretrial Risk Assessment Instrument (VPRAI)

    This pretrial assessment instrument is a great resource for developing and implementing or retuning such a tool for your agency. This collection contains: “VPRAI Instruction Manual Version 1.2”; and "VA Pretrial Risk Assessment Instrument Training".

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  • Evidence-Based Practice: Principles for Enhancing Correctional Results in Prisons

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    Evidence-Based Practice: Principles for Enhancing Correctional Results in Prisons

    "The purpose of this paper is to introduce prison administrators and staff to an accumulated body of knowledge regarding correctional practice to enhance their management of their prisons" (p.1). Sections comprising this discussion paper are: introduction -- transition from prison to the community, effective correctional practice, overview of prison research findings for prison classification, and summary; an overview of prison classification and risk assessment – correctional programming, guidelines, staff, and impact; and prison realities -- organizational culture and priorities, staff recruitment and training, role of staff, additional considerations (such as gangs, drugs, threats, and extortion), excellence in prison practice, implications for correctional practice, anticipated goals and outcomes, integration with community corrections, and corporate accountability. Provided as appendixes are "Eight Evidence-Based Principles for Effective Practice: Linking to Prison-Based Corrections" and "Measuring Inmate Competencies."

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  • Evidence-Based Practice to Reduce Recidivism: Implications for State Judiciaries

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    Evidence-Based Practice to Reduce Recidivism: Implications for State Judiciaries

    The reduction of recidivism by state judiciaries utilizing six principles of evidence-based practice (EBP) is explained. Seven sections follow an executive summary: introduction; current state sentencing policies and their consequences; drug courts -- the state judiciary's successful experiment with EBP; the principles of EBP; local sentencing and corrections policy reforms; state sentencing and corrections policy reforms; and conclusion. "[C]arefully targeted rehabilitation and treatment programs can reduce offender recidivism by conservative estimates of 10-20%" (p. 72).

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