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  • Model Practices for Parents in Prisons and Jails: Building Partnerships and Innovative Practices

    Model Practices for Parents in Prisons and Jails: Building Partnerships and Innovative Practices

    The National Institute of Corrections in collaboration with the Bureau of Justice Assistance presented “Building Partnerships & Innovative Practices” as part of an ongoing webinar series from the Family Connections Project. The presenters of the webinar discuss their unique partnerships centered on keeping children connected to their incarcerated parents. The webinar stems from the Model Practices for Parents in Prisons and Jails document.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Learn about promising practices pertaining to keeping children connected with their incarcerated parents.
    • Gain an understanding of approaches to partnerships correctional administrators and community leaders have taken to successfully implement these practices.
    • Learn of the different types of partnerships that can be formed and the importance of these partnerships.

    Orginally broadcast: August 23rd, 2021 8am PST / 9am MST /10am CST /11am EST
     

    Speakers

    Hilary Cuthrell, (PhD) Correctional Program Specialist, National Institute of Corrections

    Trina Sexton, Warden York Correctional Institution, Connecticut Department of Correction

    Nancy Correa, (DrPH), Practice Administrator: Public Health Pediatrics, Texas Children’s Hospital

    Pajarita Charles (PhD), Assistant Professor, Sandra Rosenbaum School of Social Work, University of Wisconsin-Madison

    Webinar
  • Learning to Value Your Employees

    Learning to Value Your Employees

    As a leader, when was the last time you seriously thought about the kind of influence you want to have on your people? With a new generation of employees entering the criminal justice field, leaders need to examine how effectively they influence and develop others. Employees today want to be engaged; expect to grow their knowledge, skills, and abilities; and work for a purpose.

    To be effective, leaders must shift from the practice of simply managing to get work done to leading from a people-centered perspective. This webinar identifies how you can inspire people to achieve unexpected or remarkable results, both individually and as a team. You will learn about the four pillars of transformational leadership and how you can redefine the nature of leadership in the field of corrections.

    Takeaways:

    • Leaders are deeply respected and serve as powerful role models with high moral and ethical integrity.
    • Leaders are mentors, coaches, or guides who listen and address each employee’s concerns and needs as best as possible.
    • Leaders inspire and motivate employees to perform beyond expectations.
    • Leaders support a growth mindset and stimulate employees’ creativity and innovation.

    This webinar was orginally broadcast on August 18, 2021 10 am PT / 11 am MT /12 pm CT / 1 pm ET for one hour.

    Speakers

    Dr. Rowlanda Cawthon, Dean and Associate Professor, Northwest University
    Dr. Janice Doucet Thompson, Founder and Managing Principal, JD Thompson & Associates, LLC, Adjunct Faculty at the University of San Diego and the University of California, Davis

    Dr. Cawthon served the Washington State Department of Corrections for over 11 years before transitioning to higher education. Her corrections experience includes serving as a classification counselor, community corrections officer, communications consultant, and correctional unit supervisor. Rowlanda is a passionate and innovative leader who capitalized on her leadership experience in corrections and doctoral education to drive change in her workplace. In her role as dean, she is leading a Ready to Work initiative that promises to unleash the leadership potential of undergraduate and graduate students in the workplace.

    Dr. Thompson has achieved results for people and organizations for more than 30 years. A highly experienced and skilled executive leadership coach, Janice leads her Sacramento-based organizational development consultancy with a focus on leadership coaching, succession planning and talent management, change management, and leadership development.

    Janice is certified as a Marshall Goldsmith stakeholder-centered coach; a fellow at the Institute of Coaching, McClean (Affiliate of Harvard Medical School); and channel partner with the Ken Blanchard Companies.

    Rowlanda and Janice earned their doctoral degrees together, co-instructed an international consulting experience for MBA students in Prague, Czech Republic, and are equally committed to developing transformational leaders in all professional sectors.

    Webinar
  • Learning to Lead from the Inside Out

    Learning to Lead from the Inside Out

    So, you are a leader now? Here comes the hard part, working on you! Every leader who seeks to transform people and organizations must look inward. What sets transformational leaders apart from the rest is a desire to continuously understand and improve themselves. Your willingness to work on yourself with all your good parts and flaws will be the pivotal turning point that determines what kind of leader you will be. Correctional settings need leaders who have the capacity to drive creativity and innovate change. In this interactive webinar, we discuss how to lead from within by exploring the power of personal awareness, personal mastery, and personal integrity. These essential traits will lay the foundation for you to effectively transform yourself, creating the pathway for you to influence others and transform the correctional agency you serve.

    Takeaways

    • Personal awareness is understanding yourself.
    • Personal integrity inspires you to become who others want to follow.
    • Personal mastery is the discipline of personal growth and learning.

    This webinar was orginally broadcast on July 21, 2021 / 10 am PT / 11 am MT /12 pm CT / 1 pm ET for one hour.

    Speakers

    Dr. Rowlanda Cawthon, Dean and Associate Professor, Northwest University
    Dr. Janice Doucet Thompson, Founder and Managing Principal, JD Thompson & Associates, LLC, Adjunct Faculty at the University of San Diego and the University of California, Davis

    Dr. Cawthon served the Washington State Department of Corrections for over 11 years before transitioning to higher education. Her corrections experience includes serving as a classification counselor, community corrections officer, communications consultant, and correctional unit supervisor. Rowlanda is a passionate and innovative leader who capitalized on her leadership experience in corrections and doctoral education to drive change in her workplace. In her role as dean, she is leading a Ready to Work initiative that promises to unleash the leadership potential of undergraduate and graduate students in the workplace.

    Dr. Thompson has achieved results for people and organizations for more than 30 years. A highly experienced and skilled executive leadership coach, Janice leads her Sacramento-based organizational development consultancy with a focus on leadership coaching, succession planning and talent management, change management, and leadership development.

    Janice is certified as a Marshall Goldsmith stakeholder-centered coach; a fellow at the Institute of Coaching, McClean (Affiliate of Harvard Medical School); and channel partner with the Ken Blanchard Companies.

    Rowlanda and Janice earned their doctoral degrees together, co-instructed an international consulting experience for MBA students in Prague, Czech Republic, and are equally committed to developing transformational leaders in all professional sectors.

    Webinar
  • The Foundation of Practical Application of Risk, Need, and Responsivity in the Age of COVID-19 and Justice Reform

    The Foundation of Practical Application of Risk, Need, and Responsivity in the Age of COVID-19 and Justice Reform

    Risk and need (RNR) assessments have been administered in the criminal justice system for decades but often have not influenced professional decision-making in intended ways. Although these assessments should improve outcomes by matching individuals to indicated services, information derived from these tools has often been ignored or has been connected to increased incarceration rates and unfair racial and ethnic disparities. For example, people classified as high risk may be more likely to be detained pretrial or to receive a jail or prison sentence, when almost no tools have been developed or validated for this purpose. Most commonly used tools were created to set community-based conditions of treatment and supervision in lieu of detention. Especially in the light of the COVID-19 pandemic and discussions around criminal justice reform, practitioners and policy makers must understand what RNR is and how it should be applied correctly to enhance both public health and public safety. This webinar seeks to define the core principles and practical application of Risk-Need-Responsivity along with strategies to create and maintain critical collaborative relationships to achieve reentry goals.

    Learning Objectives: During this 90-minute webinar, participants will:

    • Understand how common fallacies and misunderstandings about RNR principles have contributed to unnecessary reliance on incarceration and links to racial and ethnic disparities
    • Learn how proper use of RNR can reduce disparities, enhance criminal justice outcomes, and contribute to effective and equitable justice reform
    • Experience a practical application of the principles in a case study of reintegrating individuals within Multnomah County, Oregon
    • Learn strategies to create and maintain collaborative relationships to achieve your jurisdiction’s reentry goals

    This webinar was originally broadcast  July 21, 2021/ 11am PT / 12pm MT /1pm CT / 2pm ET for 90 minutes.

     

    Speakers
    Douglas B. Marlowe, J.D., Ph.D., is a senior scientific consultant for the National Association of Drug Court Professionals (NADCP) and senior science and policy advisor for Alcohol Monitoring Systems. Previously, he was the chief of science, law and policy for NADCP, the director of law and ethics research at the Treatment Research Institute, and an adjunct associate professor of psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Dr. Marlowe has published over 175 journal articles, monographs, books, and book chapters on the topics of correctional rehabilitation, forensic psychology, and treatment of substance use disorders.

    Erika Preuitt is the director of Multnomah County Department of Community Justice in Oregon, which provides adult and juvenile probation, pretrial release detention and parole and juvenile services. Ms. Preuitt has over twenty years of experience with the Department of Community Justice. Her core value is that people can change, and she is committed to evidence-based practices and community engagement and partnership. Ms. Preuitt is also the immediate past-president of the American Probation and Parole Association. She has served in several leadership roles in APPA.

    Mack Jenkins’s career in the criminal justice system spanned four decades. Chief Jenkins retired as the chief probation officer for San Diego County, where he oversaw a department of more than 1,300 staff who provided supervision and services to more than 13,000 adults and 2,500 juveniles under supervision. During his career, Jenkins has developed expertise in the use of evidenced-based practices for community supervision, implemented special supervision programs for people with domestic violence and sex crime convictions, and managed reentry programs for justice-involved juveniles. He has more than 20 years of experience working in drug courts and collaborative justice programs. While chief in San Diego, he chaired both the San Diego County Community Corrections Partnership and the Juvenile justice Coordinating Council.

     

     

    Webinar
  • Measuring What Matters: Outcome and Performance Measures for the Pretrial Services Field

    cover image for publication
    Measuring What Matters: Outcome and Performance Measures for the Pretrial Services Field

    The first edition of this publication was released in 2011. As pretrial services have redefined its goals and strategic objectives, so must its outcome and performance metrics change. To that end—and to ensure that metrics for the field continue to be developed by practitioners—NIC commissioned PEN to assess the current pretrial landscape and revise current metrics to match these new dynamics. This process included internal discussion by PEN members and input via a survey from pretrial services agency directors whose agencies collect performance metrics. PEN member discussions and the survey focused on which measures “work” in the real world, which were problematic, and what other data should be considered to gauge agency outcomes. The metrics presented here reflect this feedback. Outcomes are now tied to the three principles of bail—maximizing release, court appearance, and public safety—and a more refined definition of system “success” in meeting these objectives. Included commentary discusses how changes in the pretrial landscape over the past decade have helped redefine outcome and performance metrics.

    Document
  • Solving the Dilemma of Self-Injurious Behavior in the Incarcerated Population

    Solving the Dilemma of Self-Injurious Behavior in the Incarcerated Population Image
    Solving the Dilemma of Self-Injurious Behavior in the Incarcerated Population

    Do you want to develop a better understanding of the self-injurious behavior found among adults under your care and custody in a correctional setting? Would you like to improve your knowledge of the causes of their behavior and the most appropriate responses? 

    Self-injury continues to significantly affect correctional systems around the world, leading to adverse outcomes for the incarcerated people who participate in this behavior and the staff charged with their supervision and care.  To address this issue, correctional staff need a better understanding of self-injurious behaviors and the potential toll that witnessing these actions can take on correctional officers and other key staff.

    This interactive one-hour webinar delivers a practical, professional framework that can help staff protect themselves while also providing superior institutional responses to the self-injurious behavior found among the men and women in their custody. We will emphasize the nuances of self-injury in the correctional setting and the need for partnerships between multi-disciplinary teams to maximize outcomes.

    Learning Objectives:

    • During this one-hour interactive webinar, participants will:
    • Develop an understanding of the underlying motivations, prevalence, and manifestation of self-injurious behavior among incarcerated adults,
    • Identify the potential risks associated with witnessing self-injurious behavior and how that could affect correctional staff wellness and resiliency, and
    • Gain knowledge about the most appropriate institutional responses to self-injury among the incarcerated population.

    Speaker

    Dr. Hayden Smith is a professor of criminology and criminal justice at the University of South Carolina.  His principal focus of study is the intersection of the criminal justice and public health systems. Dr. Smith is a national and international expert on self-injurious and suicidal behaviors occurring in incarcerated populations. Other areas of study include officer wellness and resiliency, the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA), reentry initiatives, and best practices in evaluating corrections-based programs. Dr. Smith has published extensively on self-harm among the incarcerated population and has numerous experiences working with diverse correctional agencies.

    Originally broadcast on May 27, 2021

    Webinar
  • That’s DOPE – Making Every Voice Count!, Part 4

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    That’s DOPE – Making Every Voice Count!, Part 4

    We know how you say it matters, and now, in today’s multicultural world, why we said it is equally important. Our experiences and values lead us to unique perspectives about our behavior. A correctional organization’s ability to leverage all voices is much like a music producer. Each unique perspective has its own melody, scale, and intensity that, when combined, can lead to making an impactful DOPE sound.

    In the workplace, it’s the team’s collective finely tuned voice that, when in sync, will have the most considerable impact on success. Implementing the techniques that we will share with you will help you get to the D.O.P.E. sound/impact you are striving for. We will walk you through the steps of creating an environment, which allows your team to learn how to listen and be heard together. You will leave as producers with the latest tools to aid in encouraging the engagement and contributions indicative of a high-performing team.

    Take-Aways :
    Techniques to create a (D.O.P.E) unified voice through:

    D iverse and Inclusive: Representative at all levels of the organization
    O pen and Fair: Transparent and equal access to opportunities
    P sychologically Safe Place: A space where people can feel free to be themselves
    E quitable: Access to shape and develop

    Speakers
    Alfranda Durr, CEO ALD & Associates LLC
    Kari Heistad, CEO Cultural Coach International

    Alfranda (Al) and Kari are Diversity and Inclusion Practitioners with 40 plus years of combined experience conducting in-person and virtual training on a wide range of Human Resources, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion topics. Al and Kari have partnered on a popular webinar series covering a wide range of diversity topics. Combined, Al and Kari bring varied perspectives and ways of seeing the world to their presentations.

    Originally broadcast May 12, 2021

    Webinar
  • A Leader’s Role in Promoting Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Culture, Part 3

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    A Leader’s Role in Promoting Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Culture, Part 3

    The landscape of the work environment has been irreversibly changed. Stepping into a leadership role continues to be a great privilege, but today it also comes with the even greater responsibility of creating a workplace culture that values all individuals. We designed this presentation to help you build on the fundamentals that will allow you to L.E.A.D. the charge in promoting diversity, equity, and inclusion (DE&I). Allow us to provide you four foundational actions that will distinguish you as a forward-thinking influencer who can communicate and demonstrate DE&I practices. This webinar gives you the tools to confidently move your team in the right direction to achieve exceptional performance in the corrections workplace.
    This one-hour webinar:
    1. Explores ways to dive deep into your “why” as an influencer on the correctional organization’s culture and workforce performance through purposeful interactions with clients, community partners, and stakeholders.
    2. Provides insights on how to utilize emotional intelligence principles to better understand colleagues, team members, and the correctional organization’s clients/stakeholders.
    3. Participates in interactive skill-building exercises to put that “why” into action to achieve personal and professional goals.

    Originally broadcast on April 20 , 2021.
    This is part three in a four part series.

    Take-Aways :

    Pathway to L.E.A.D. a DE&I Culture

    Listen: Gain a perspective or understating of the issues and opportunities people are facing
    Engage: Develop and implement strategies to drive change that is relevant and meaningful
    Assess: Sources of inclusion at the Organization, Leadership, and Individual level
    Direct and facilitate change: Based on your assessments, implement interventions and solutions to address opportunities to build and develop an inclusive culture


    Speakers

    Alfranda Durr, CEO ALD & Associates LLC
    Kari Heistad, CEO Cultural Coach International

    Alfranda (Al) and Kari are Diversity and Inclusion Practitioners with 40 plus years of combined experience conducting in-person and virtual training on a wide range of Human Resources, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion topics. Al and Kari have partnered on a popular diversity webinar series covering a wide range of diversity topics. Combined, Al and Kari bring varied perspectives to their presentations.

    Webinar
  • Indian Country Jail Administration

    Indian Country Jail Administration

    This 36-hour training program focuses on the basic skills and competencies jail administrators in Indian Country need to effectively meet their responsibilities. Eleven modules comprise this training: program overview and clarifying the role of the Jail Administrator; building support for the jail in the justice system and community; using jail standards as a basis for policy and operations; managing risk; developing and assessing policies and procedures; determining staffing needs; promoting optimal staff performance; managing jail resources; managing inmate behavior; assessing jail operations; and action plan development, reports, closeout, and evaluation.

    Document
  • BIA Detention Facility Staffing Analysis Workshop

    BIA Detention Facility Staffing Analysis Workshop

    In this workshop, you will: examine your role and purpose in conducting staffing analyses for detention facilities; learn the steps in conducting a jail staffing analysis based on the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) model; plan and conduct a mock staffing analysis; prepare and present a staffing analysis; and explore ways to optimize staff available staff resources. Six modules comprise this manual: workshop overview and agenda; clarifying roles and expectations; laying a foundation; conducting the staffing analysis—Part 1 and Part 2; and other staffing considerations.

    Document
  • BIA Adult Detention Facility Guidelines: Assessing, Achieving, and Sustaining Compliance: Lesson Plans and Slides [and] Participant Manual

    BIA Adult Detention Facility Guidelines: Assessing, Achieving, and Sustaining Compliance: Lesson Plans and Slides [and] Participant Manual

    Participants of this training program will: understand the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Detention Guidelines—content and purpose; learn steps to take to prepare for and conduct a facility audit; know how to determine compliance and to identify deficiencies; plan and conduct an audit; develop and present a compliance plan in a written report; and learn how to serve as a resource to help facilities achieve and sustain compliance. Modules cover: welcome, introductions, and program overview; detention guidelines overview; detention guidelines content review; preparing for the audit; conducting the audit; developing and presenting a corrective action plan; and monitoring and providing support in sustaining compliance.

    Document
  • What’s Your Eye Chart Saying? How Our Beliefs Filter Our Views, Part 1

    What’s Your Eye Chart Saying? How Our Beliefs Filter Our Views, Part 1

    When was the last time you had your eyes examined? Just as the health of our vision is maintained through regular eye exams, the way in which we see the world is maintained through self-awareness and broadening our perspectives. In the midst of quarantines, telework, and increased isolation from both friends and colleagues, we are also living through a time of social unrest. For many people, this time in history has brought new insights into the criminal justice system and interaction across cultures and life experiences.

    If you are interested in improving your cultural “eye sight,” this one-hour interactive webinar sponsored by the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) is for you! Our vision for how we view and perceive others is impacted by our individual beliefs, values, and past experiences. In this webinar, we’ll explore preconceptions and techniques that can be used to understand how other people see the world. By gaining insight into your own personal filters, you will be able to engage in difficult conversations and begin to develop a greater sense of awareness and empathy that starts with YOU.

    Originally broadcast on August 20, 2020.
    This is part one in a four part series.

    Take Aways:
    Prepare to learn how to develop your H.U.E.:
    H elp with cultural considerations toward effective communication in corrections;
    U nderstand how your preconceptions and values influence your vision;
    E nhance your ability to navigate shared experiences.


    Speakers:
    Alfranda Durr, CEO ALD & Associates LLC
    Kari Heistad, CEO Cultural Coach International

    Alfranda (Al) and Kari are Certified Diversity and Inclusion Practitioners with 40 plus years of combined experience conducting in-person and virtual training on a wide range of Human Resources, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion topics. Al and Kari have partnered on a popular diversity webinar series covering a wide range of diversity topics. Combined, Al and Kari bring diverse perspectives and ways of seeing the world to their presentations.

     

    Webinar
  • Building Inclusion Across Multi-Disciplinary Teams, Part 2

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    Building Inclusion Across Multi-Disciplinary Teams, Part 2

    Do you feel like you are working in an inclusive environment? Organizations of all kinds – including corrections – have wrestled with how to create an inclusive culture and promote inclusivity for decades. Now the stakes are even higher to develop and cultivate a culture that promotes excellence by leveraging everyone’s skills, abilities, knowledge, and workplace experiences. Focusing on your workforce’s diverse talents will promote a heightened awareness of each person’s contribution and produce higher performing teams.

    If you are interested in being part of a team where everyone can contribute and feel they are a valued member, this one-hour interactive webinar sponsored by the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) will benefit you. In this webinar, we explore the benefits of building inclusion across multi-disciplinary teams in corrections to increase cultural awareness, operational effectiveness, and program efficacy.

    Originally broadcast on March 31, 2021.
    This is part two in a four part series.

    Take-Aways :
    Prepare to learn Building Inclusion (I.C.E):
    I ncrease effective communication and collaboration between teams and working units;
    C odify processes and behaviors that promote innovative solutions to complex issues; and
    E xcel in the face of organizational change.


    Speakers:

    Alfranda Durr, CEO ALD & Associates LLC

    Kari Heistad, CEO Cultural Coach International

    Alfranda (Al) and Kari are Certified Diversity and Inclusion Practitioners with 40 plus years of combined experience conducting in-person and virtual training on a wide range of Human Resources, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion topics. Al and Kari have partnered on a popular diversity webinar series covering a wide range of diversity topics. Combined, Al and Kari bring varied perspectives and worldviews to their presentations.

    Webinar
  • Promoting Wellness and Resiliency in Correctional Staff

    wellness webinar
    Promoting Wellness and Resiliency in Correctional Staff

    Do you want to see what some of the latest data and promising practices are revealing about staff wellness for corrections officers and staff?  Would you like to learn how to apply a holistic approach to your workplace along the continuum of preventive to reactive responses?  Correctional staff face significant stress and challenges in maintaining wellness and resiliency in the workplace.  There is emerging evidence that effective strategies and programs exist; however, they often occur in a piecemeal or sporadic fashion.  This webinar provides academic insight into the current research on officer wellness and references emerging areas of innovative practices.  It includes practitioner expertise on valuable resources and support for correctional officers and staff.  The webinar moves from preventive to reactive strategies and builds on new approaches to increase resiliency.  Participants will learn what research and practice tell us about the short and long-term effects that working in corrections can have and how to promote staff wellness and manage trauma in response to what they experience.

    Learning Objectives: 

    During this one-hour interactive webinar, participants will

    1. Develop an understanding of the current research on correctional staff wellness and resiliency,
    2. Learn how to apply a holistic approach to their workplace, and
    3. Gain knowledge on promising real-world practices that can assist and promote both wellness and resiliency.

    Speakers

    Dr. Hayden Smith is an Associate Professor of Criminology & Criminal Justice at the University of South Carolina.  His principal focus of study is the intersection of the criminal justice and public health systems.  Core areas include self-injurious and suicidal behaviors in incarcerated populations, physical and mental health needs in correctional settings, jail diversion, reentry initiatives, and correctional staff well-being and safety.  Dr. Smith has expertise in program evaluation and policy analysis and has worked with numerous correctional and health systems.

    Ms. Karin Ho is the Director for Victim Services with the South Carolina Department of Corrections.  She has more than 30 years of victim advocacy experience and over 25 years in corrections.  Recognizing how correctional staff were affected by traumatic events, she implemented the Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM) Peer Team and Post Critical Incident Seminars for employees with ongoing trauma-related issues.  As part of the CISM Team, Karin is the handler for a specially trained trauma dog who responds to correctional staff throughout the state.

    The presenters have engaged in several academic-practitioner partnerships that address correctional officer and staff well-being.

    Webinar
  • Recommendations for Practice: Post-Conviction Victims' Rights and Services

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    Recommendations for Practice: Post-Conviction Victims' Rights and Services
    In 2017, the National Institute of Corrections and the National Crime Victim Law Institute began work on a project to analyze existing rights and services, identify gaps and opportunities for inter-agency collaboration, and draft a set of recommendations to assist jurisdictions in the development of systems to improve rights compliance and implementation of integrated trauma-informed services post conviction.
    Stakeholders participating in this project collaboratively envisioned a model of trauma-informed post-conviction systems, processes, laws, and policies that were responsive to the rights, needs, and recovery of victims while holding offenders accountable and promoting safe communities. As a result of this collaboration, a list of recommendations were developed that aim to move post-conviction services and systems toward consistently affording victims their rights—including the rights to be treated with fairness, dignity, and respect—and recognizing victims as integral actors in, and consumers of, meaningful and effective post-conviction systems. This paper is the product of project efforts.
    Document
  • BIA Adult Detention Facility Guidelines

    BIA Adult Detention Facility Guidelines

    This resources contains: The BIA Adult Detention Facility Guidelines are drawn from the national Performance-Based Core Jail Standards, developed by the American Correctional Association (ACA). BIA Corrections Handbook: contains policies, rules, and regulations that apply to all detention personnel. ADF audit form: A checklist for preforming an audit of a detention facility. ADF Guidelines which outline the standards.

    Document
  • 2019 Corrections Environmental Scan

    2019 Corrections Environmental Scan

    Now in its 14th edition, an updated online version of the Corrections Environment Scan is presented here. Renamed the Corrections Environmental Scan in 2017, it continues to evolve into a popular tool that corrections practitioners use to inform their work in jails, prisons, and community supervision.

    The report is arranged into five topics: Population Demographics, Economy, Workforce, Technology, and Statistics, with the special highlighted topic: Justice Involved Women. The Corrections Environmental Scan is intended to give a broad overview of the latest news and trends in these topics, from the corrections, domestic, and global perspectives.

    Web Page
  • How Do I Design / Add Engagement, Interaction and Collaboration Tools? Part 3

    How Do I Design / Add Engagement, Interaction and Collaboration Tools? Part 3

    This is a three part webinar series. Each webinar builds into the next!

    Are you converting your instructor led training (a.k.a. face-to-face or in-person training) to live virtual instructor led training (VILT)? Do you know where to start to convert face-to-face training and materials, such as your facilitator guides, participant guides, slide shows, and other learning experience materials?

    What We Will Do in the Webinar Series?

    1. Explore popular virtual platforms, compare and contrast them to your unique agency needs / outcomes for virtual learning.
    2. Assess agency technology infrastructure as well as learner, trainer, and agency readiness for virtual learning.
    3. Survey best practices to determine the duration of virtual learning based upon training outcomes.
    4. Apply options for participant engagement, interaction, and collaboration during virtual learning.
    5. Share experiences from other correctional agencies with respect to in-person to virtual conversions.

    If you are interested in the answers to these questions and more, then watch this webinar series!

    Part 3:

    In the third webinar of this series, participants use the ADDIE road map to guide steps needed to design in and add engagements, interactions, and collaboration tools into their virtual instructor led training (VILT) conversion process. The webinar includes defining engagements and interactions that lead to virtual collaboration, and highlights various examples of how to design and add these tools to virtual training design and facilitation. Included in the webinar is demonstration and practice of using a design flow tool for detailing engagements, interactions, and collaborations to meet a performance objective. Sample design flow is shared for a virtual performance objective from NIC's Correctional Leadership Development (CLD) virtual training series.

    Facilitators

    • Jeff Hadnot, Chief, NIC Academy Division
    • Ashley Kerr, Training Officer, Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction
    • Elizabeth Kreger, Assistant Director of Adult Options, Ohio Department of Education
    • Leslie LeMaster, Correctional Program Specialist, NIC Academy Division
    • Jim Wiseman, Director of Training (retired), Missouri Department of Corrections
    Webinar
  • What’s Next? How Do I Convert ILT to VILT? The Basics, Part 2

    What’s Next? How Do I Convert ILT to VILT? The Basics, Part 2

    This is a three part webinar series. Each webinar builds into the next!

    Are you converting your instructor led training (a.k.a. face-to-face or in-person training) to live virtual instructor led training (VILT)? Do you know where to start to convert face-to-face training and materials, such as your facilitator guides, participant guides, slide shows, and other learning experience materials?

    What We Will Do in the Webinar Series?

    1. Explore popular virtual platforms, compare and contrast them to your unique agency needs / outcomes for virtual learning.
    2. Assess agency technology infrastructure as well as learner, trainer, and agency readiness for virtual learning.
    3. Survey best practices to determine the duration of virtual learning based upon training outcomes.
    4. Apply options for participant engagement, interaction, and collaboration during virtual learning.
    5. Share experiences from other correctional agencies with respect to in-person to virtual conversions.

    If you are interested in the answers to these questions and more, then watch this webinar series!

    Part 2:

    In the second webinar of this series, participants use the ADDIE road map to guide steps needed to analyze, design, develop, implement and evaluate the instructor led training (ILT) to virtual instructor led training (VILT) conversion process. Best practices for converting from ILT to VILT are detailed including analyzing status of curriculum you are converting to virtual, is it a one to one hour ratio from in person to live virtual delivery hours, virtual digital live and off-live activities, and determining session duration and number of live virtual sessions. The webinar includes three agency conversion stories, focused on the steps to converting from in person to virtual training.

    Experiences are shared from
    1) Ohio Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation's (ODRC) New Employee Orientation (NEO) training,
    2) NIC's Correctional Leadership Development (CLD) training, and
    3) NIC's Thinking for a Change (T4C) Facilitator training.

    Facilitators

    • Jeff Hadnot, Chief, NIC Academy Division
    • Ashley Kerr, Training Officer, Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction
    • Elizabeth Kreger, Assistant Director of Adult Options, Ohio Department of Education
    • Leslie LeMaster, Correctional Program Specialist, NIC Academy Division
    • Jim Wiseman, Director of Training (retired), Missouri Department of Corrections
    Webinar
  • Where Do I Start? Using ADDIE as a Roadmap for Conversion, Part 1

    Where Do I Start? Using ADDIE as a Roadmap for Conversion, Part 1

    This is a three part webinar series. Each webinar builds into the next!

    Are you converting your instructor led training (a.k.a. face-to-face or in-person training) to live virtual instructor led training (VILT)? Do you know where to start to convert face-to-face training and materials, such as your facilitator guides, participant guides, slide shows, and other learning experience materials?

    What We Will Do in the Webinar Series?

    1. Explore popular virtual platforms, compare and contrast them to your unique agency needs / outcomes for virtual learning.
    2. Assess agency technology infrastructure as well as learner, trainer, and agency readiness for virtual learning.
    3. Survey best practices to determine the duration of virtual learning based upon training outcomes.
    4. Apply options for participant engagement, interaction, and collaboration during virtual learning.
    5. Share experiences from other correctional agencies with respect to in-person to virtual conversions.

    Part 1:
    In this webinar, participants used the ADDIE framework (Assessment, Design, Development, Implementation and Evaluation) as a virtual roadmap to:

    • Compare and contrast the characteristics of popular virtual training platforms;
    • Assess agency technology infrastructure versus what is needed for effective live virtual training delivery;
    • Assess learner, trainer, and agency readiness for virtual learning; and
    • Determine initial steps for conversion of training from in person (instructor led training / ILT) to virtual instructor led (VILT).

     

    Facilitators

    • Jeff Hadnot, Chief, NIC Academy Division
    • Ashley Kerr, Training Officer, Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction
    • Elizabeth Kreger, Assistant Director of Adult Options, Ohio Department of Education
    • Leslie LeMaster, Correctional Program Specialist, NIC Academy Division
    • Jim Wiseman, Director of Training (retired), Missouri Department of Corrections
    Webinar
  • Becoming Trauma Informed and Moving to Trauma Responsive, Part 3

    Becoming Trauma Informed and Moving to Trauma Responsive, Part 3

    With increased awareness of the effects of stress, adversity, and trauma on people’s lives, criminal justice professionals are considering what this means in their correctional settings. There is growing evidence of the effects of child neglect and abuse (as well as other forms of traumatic stress) on the health, mental health, and behavior of men and women residing in jails and prisons. While research and clinical experience indicate that there is a high incidence of trauma and co-occurring problems among these groups, corrections professionals struggle to provide them with effective management and services. It is particularly challenging when many institutions have staff who are affected by trauma in their personal and work lives. Organizational stress and trauma create additional challenges in the environment and culture of the workplace. Moving from trauma informed to trauma responsive to implement trauma-informed care can be challenging. The webinar speakers have extensive experience in delivering trauma informed education and services to the men and women in the custody of the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation as well as other state and local agencies nationally. This webinar series guides administrators and correctional staff through the process and will provide updated information and research.

    Webinar Objectives:
    The primary goals of this three-part webinar series are to:

    •     Provide criminal justice, mental health, and substance use treatment professionals with up-to-date information regarding trauma-informed care within the criminal justice system.
    •     Provide information on the lifelong effects of trauma, recovery needs, and implementation of trauma-focused treatment interventions (including research findings).
    •     Provide an outline for the process of becoming a trauma-informed organization.

    Part 3: Becoming Trauma Informed and Moving to Trauma Responsive 
    This session discusses trauma triggers, examples of calming and grounding strategies that can be employed within correctional settings, a brief exploration of the presence of and effects of vicarious trauma with correctional staff, and suggestions regarding self-care.

    Moderators/Speakers

    •     Maureen Buell, Correctional Program Specialist, National Institute of Corrections
    •     Stephanie Covington, Ph.D., LCSW, Co-Director, Center for Gender and Justice
    •     Nena Messina, Ph.D., Research Criminologist at UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs and President of Envisioning Justice Solutions, Inc.

     

    Webinar
  • Trauma-Informed Treatment and Theory, Part 2

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    Trauma-Informed Treatment and Theory, Part 2

    With increased awareness of the effects of stress, adversity, and trauma on people’s lives, criminal justice professionals are considering what this means in their correctional settings. There is growing evidence of the effects of child neglect and abuse (as well as other forms of traumatic stress) on the health, mental health, and behavior of men and women residing in jails and prisons. While research and clinical experience indicate that there is a high incidence of trauma and co-occurring problems among these groups, corrections professionals struggle to provide them with effective management and services. It is particularly challenging when many institutions have staff who are affected by trauma in their personal and work lives. Organizational stress and trauma create additional challenges in the environment and culture of the workplace. Moving from trauma informed to trauma responsive to implement trauma-informed care can be challenging. The webinar speakers have extensive experience in delivering trauma informed education and services to the men and women in the custody of the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation as well as other state and local agencies nationally. This webinar series guides administrators and correctional staff through the process and will provide updated information and research.

    Webinar Objectives:
    The primary goals of this three-part webinar series are to:

    •     Provide criminal justice, mental health, and substance use treatment professionals with up-to-date information regarding trauma-informed care within the criminal justice system.
    •     Provide information on the lifelong effects of trauma, recovery needs, and implementation of trauma-focused treatment interventions (including research findings).
    •     Provide an outline for the process of becoming a trauma-informed organization.

    Each of the sessions includes discussion of content, polling and video clips, a question and answer period, as well as a list of resources referenced during the presentations.  

    Part 2: This session discusses the rationale for trauma-informed treatment, the values and efficacy of trauma informed services, and related research findings.

    Moderators/Speakers

    • Maureen Buell, Correctional Program Specialist, National Institute of Corrections
    • Stephanie Covington, Ph.D., LCSW, Co-Director, Center for Gender and Justice
    • Nena Messina, Ph.D., Research Criminologist at UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs and President of Envisioning Justice Solutions, Inc.
    Webinar
  • The Association between ACEs and Criminal Justice Involvement, Part 1

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    The Association between ACEs and Criminal Justice Involvement, Part 1

    With increased awareness of the effects of stress, adversity, and trauma on people’s lives, criminal justice professionals are considering what this means in their correctional settings. There is growing evidence of the effects of child neglect and abuse (as well as other forms of traumatic stress) on the health, mental health, and behavior of men and women residing in jails and prisons. While research and clinical experience indicate that there is a high incidence of trauma and co-occurring problems among these groups, corrections professionals struggle to provide them with effective management and services. It is particularly challenging when many institutions have staff who are affected by trauma in their personal and work lives. Organizational stress and trauma create additional challenges in the environment and culture of the workplace. Moving from trauma informed to trauma responsive to implement trauma-informed care can be challenging. The webinar speakers have extensive experience in delivering trauma informed education and services to the men and women in the custody of the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation as well as other state and local agencies nationally. This webinar series guides administrators and correctional staff through the process and will provide updated information and research.

    Webinar Objectives:
    The primary goals of this three-part webinar series are to:

    •     Provide criminal justice, mental health, and substance use treatment professionals with up-to-date information regarding trauma-informed care within the criminal justice system.
    •     Provide information on the lifelong effects of trauma, recovery needs, and implementation of trauma-focused treatment interventions (including research findings).
    •     Provide an outline for the process of becoming a trauma-informed organization.

    Each of the sessions includes discussion of content, polling and video clips, a question and answer period as well as a list of resources referenced during the presentations.  

    Part 1: This session provides a series of definitions, a brief research overview, the implications of adverse childhood exposures (ACEs) and the potential for lifelong impact.  It further addresses the relationship between trauma and substance use disorders (SUD), the relationship between trauma and violence, and the complex needs of recovery.

    Moderators/Speakers

    • Maureen Buell, Correctional Program Specialist, National Institute of Corrections
    • Stephanie Covington, Ph.D., LCSW, Co-Director, Center for Gender and Justice
    • Nena Messina, Ph.D., Research Criminologist at UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs and President of Envisioning Justice Solutions, Inc.
    Webinar
  • Defining and Measuring Correctional Performance Final Report

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    Defining and Measuring Correctional Performance Final Report

    Development of outcome-based performance systems of management for correctional agencies has been an important initiative for the Association of State Correctional Administrators (ASCA) since the early 1990s. It was envisioned as a means of assessing performance across jurisdictions, promoting the use of performance-based management by correctional agencies, and improving the planning and management capacities of correctional organizations across the nation. Our specific project objectives were threefold: 1) identify a series of correctional measures that are considered to be the most crucial aspects of quality incarceration; 2) develop a set of indicators that reflect the essence of each measure; and, 3) define each indicator to allow for standard application of the measures across jurisdictions. Recognizing the complexity and scope of the potential performance measures for correctional agencies, for the purposes of this project, we focused on measures of public safety, institutional safety, treatment and programming, and contextual data. This report describes our work to date, identifies the performance indicators developed by the subcommittee, summarizes a preliminary assessment of state correctional agencies’ capacity to participate, and outlines the next steps for continued development of a national performance measurement system.

    Document
  • Performance-Based Measures System Resource Manual

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    Performance-Based Measures System Resource Manual

    PBMS is an automated web-based system developed by ASCA for collecting, managing, and sharing accurate adult prison-based corrections data that will enable timely and sound decision-making by correctional administrators to ensure institutional safety, to enhance the security of our facilities for prisoners and staff, and to maximize the effectiveness and efficiency of correctional resources. This manual provides the user all the tools necessary to use PBMS.

    Document
  • Performance-Based Measures System Counting Rules: Revised Key Indicators and Characteristics

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    Performance-Based Measures System Counting Rules: Revised Key Indicators and Characteristics

    This document provides correctional facilities definitions and the rules for maintaining statistics for their institutions. Including, but not limited to, operational capacity, inmates, housed, inmates outsourced, male security staff, female security, institutional staff.

    Document
  • COVID-19: How are Pretrial Service Agencies Dealing with the Coronavirus? [Webinar]

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    COVID-19: How are Pretrial Service Agencies Dealing with the Coronavirus? [Webinar]

    In line with directives from the White House, state authorities, and local officials, criminal justice agencies around the country have modified operations to comply with social distancing, travel restrictions, and mandatory health orders due to COVID-19. These policies have a significant impact on the judiciary, causing courthouse closures, the suspension of jury trials, and the halting or modification of court orders. It has required criminal justice decision makers to swiftly examine their pretrial populations and practices to comply with these modified operations.

    In this webinar you will hear from decision makers who were responsible for upholding these recommendations. They will share their challenges and experiences in implementing these directives, as well as the opportunities they found for adopting long- term practice changes that focus on maximizing public safety, court appearances, and release of pretrial defendants.

    Webinar Objectives:

    • Discuss the collaborative efforts among pretrial services, the courts, district attorney’s offices, and jails to manage the pretrial population during the coronavirus pandemic.
    • Identify innovative approaches to support defendant court appearance and connection with pretrial service officers.
    • Highlight early challenges and opportunities.
    • Show how technology is playing a key role in the new normal.
    • Provide key resources to the field.

    Moderators/Speakers:
    Greg Crawford, Correctional Program Specialist, National Institute of Corrections
    Lori Eville, Correctional Program Specialist, National Institute of Corrections
    Spurgeon Kennedy, Vice-President, National Association of Pretrial Services Agencies

    Panel Members:
    The Honorable Karen Thomas, Judge, 17th Judicial District of Kentucky
    Tara Boh Blair, Executive Officer, Kentucky Court of Justice, Department of Pretrial Services
    Kevin Burns, Captain, San Juan County Sheriff’s Office, New Mexico
    Krista Lawrence, Division Director, 11th Judicial District and Magistrate Courts, New Mexico
    Jon Tunheim, Prosecuting Attorney, Thurston County District Court, Washington
    Marianne Clear, Director, Thurston County Pretrial Services, Washington

    This webinar aired on September 3rd, 2020.

     

    Webinar
  • Putting the Science into Self-Injury Risk Assessment and Prevention

    Putting the Science into Self-Injury Risk Assessment and Prevention
    Putting the Science into Self-Injury Risk Assessment and Prevention

    Are you interested in learning about some of the reasons that people repeatedly and purposely injure themselves? Do you want to learn ways to manage serial self-injurious behavior? We know that self-injurious behavior is a significant problem in correctional settings. Compounding the problem is confusion about what constitutes self-injurious behavior, how to define it, and what are the potential motivational and etiological factors involved. A number of researchers have attempted to address these issues, but efforts to construct a paradigm have proven problematic. In response to this growing problem, this interactive one-hour webinar will introduce an innovative profiling system designed to develop profiles of inmates who engage in serial self-injuries. The Self-Injury Profile System (SIPS) identifies diagnostic and personality characteristics, behavioral patterns, and associated risk factors that create a SIPS profile which is used to analyze individual and group trends. Implementing a SIPS will help you and your agency develop a classification system for defining self-injurious behaviors and a paradigm for understanding the motivational and etiological factors involved. SIPS allows for the implementation of evidence-based management interventions, improvement in clinical outcomes, and reduction in health care costs associated with serial self-injurious behaviors across a facility, agency, or an entire correctional system.

    During this one-hour interactive webinar, you will learn to 1) recognize the problems and obstacles to effective assessment and treatment of non-suicidal self-injury, 2) understand the differences and unique characteristics associated with serial self-injurious behaviors and how to document the risk assessment, and 3) identify how a profiling system may be useful in developing a classification system and a paradigm for better management of serial self-injurious behaviors.

    Speaker : Dean Aufderheide Ph.D.
    Dr. Aufderheide is a board-certified correctional psychologist and licensed clinical and forensic psychologist. A former president of the International Association of Correctional and Forensic Psychology, he is the Chief of Mental Health Services for the Florida Department of Corrections and serves as the American Correctional Association’s National Mental Health Advisor.

    Webinar
  • Communicating with Families and Children in Correctional Facilities

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    Communicating with Families and Children in Correctional Facilities

    This webinar is part of a series created for the Family Connections Project, the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) invites you to attend a 1.5-hour training on how to communicate with families and children in correctional facilities. Installment two of the series will provide relevant information and strategies for staff. This webinar will cover three major topics:

    • Communication 101: Basic Types and Everyday Challenges
    • Workplace Culture and Practices: Interacting with Families and Children in Correctional Facilities
    • Applicable Practices for Staff: Interacting with Families and Children in Correctional Facilities

    Webinar
  • National Institute of Corrections Report to the Nation FY 2018: Results and Innovations

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    National Institute of Corrections Report to the Nation FY 2018: Results and Innovations

    This report presents the activity of the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) over Fiscal Year 2018. This year NIC launched several new programs including "Safety Matters: Managing Relationships in Women's Facilities", "Training A (Analysis) to E (Evaluation)", and "The Learning Professional". We facilitated numerous trainings, and provided technical assistance around the country. The reports presents to you another year of corrections innovation, scholarship, and leadership on behalf of the National Institute of Corrections.

    Document
  • The Mindful Supervisor [Webinar]

    The Mindful Supervisor Image
    The Mindful Supervisor [Webinar]

    Are you striving to meet organizational goals and crucial deadlines, yet wondering why your team’s morale has decreased? Are you aware of the messages your supervisory performance sends in stressful circumstances and their impact on your team? Are you interested in increasing your self-awareness, decrease tension, improve concentration, and ultimately improve your team's health and workplace satisfaction?

    If you answered yes to any of these questions, this one hour interactive webinar sponsored by the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) is for you! Research suggests that, as the emotional and/or mental well-being of each team member decline, organizational and professional growth are negatively affected. How you perform in stressful circumstances sends a clear message, whether positive or negative, to your team. During this interactive webinar, we will explore techniques that can be used to address workplace stress using mindfulness that starts with YOU, in your role as Supervisor.

    What can mindfulness do for you as a Supervisor? Mindfulness can help increase your self-awareness, decrease tension within you and your team, improve your concentration, and ultimately improve your team's health and workplace satisfaction. During this webinar, you will experience several mindfulness techniques to implement with your team, helping you to jumpstart your transformation to leading mindfully and improving the emotional health of your team and organization.

    Speaker

    Dr. Rosalind Smith Sistrunk, Rosalind Smith Counseling

    Dr. Sistrunk is a licensed professional clinical counselor in the state of Ohio who specializes in relationship counseling. She conducts mindfulness-based workshops and services to help improve the emotional well-being of individuals and organizations. Dr. Sistrunk believes that a supervisor’s healthy emotional well-being can have a positive impact on any workforce.

    References

    A Clinician's Guide to Teaching Mindfulness
    By Christiame Wolf, MD, PhD & J. Greg Serpa, Phd

    The Body Keeps the Score
    By Bessel Van Der Kolk, MD

    The Mindful Workplace
    By Michael Chaskalson

    The Quantum Doctor
    By Amit Goswami, PhD

    Webinar
  • Federal Interagency Reentry Council: A Record of Progress and a Roadmap for the Future

    Federal Interagency Reentry Council: A Record of Progress and a Roadmap for the Future

    With the collective commitment of leaders across the government and across the country, the Reentry Council is working to promote successful reentry and reintegration for individuals returning from prison and jail. Strengthening opportunities for second chances will not only improve outcomes for justice-involved populations, it will also reduce recidivism and victimization – creating safer communities – and save taxpayer dollars spent on the direct and collateral costs of incarceration … The Council has developed a robust set of policies, programs, and training materials to support the reintegration of formerly incarcerated individuals and reduce barriers for those with a criminal record … The Reentry Council’s path forward will be guided by an overarching commitment to realizing the goals described in this report – and ensuring that the tools for successful reentry reach the communities that need them most (p. 75).

    Document
  • Back to Normal: Considerations for Returning Jails to Pre-COVID-19 Operations

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    Back to Normal: Considerations for Returning Jails to Pre-COVID-19 Operations

    This document was written to serve as suggestions for when jail leaders begin the process of returning jail operations “back to normal”. Emergency response plans, like all policies and procedures must be tailored to the specific facility and available resources.  This includes agencies with multiple facilities, each perhaps with a different design.  COVID-19 presents some different issues to consider in emergency response planning and implementation.  While many practices put in place to enhance safety during this time are similar from county to county and jail to jail, returning jail operations “back to normal” will offer different challenges. 

    Document
  • Barracks Behind Bars II: In Veteran-Specific Housing Units, Veterans Help Veterans Help Themselves

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    Barracks Behind Bars II: In Veteran-Specific Housing Units, Veterans Help Veterans Help Themselves

    This paper is the fourth in the National Institute of Corrections justice-involved veteran compendium project. It illuminates programs in prisons across the country whose goal is to prevent recidivism by justice-involved veterans, and by so doing improve the safety of law enforcement officers, correctional officers, inmates, and the public. It illustrates the design/development, implementation, and sustainment of initiatives taken by corrections officials who have set up specialized housing—in pods, dorms, units, wings, or floors—and programming for military veterans.

    Document
  • Communicating with Families and Children in Correctional Facilities [Webinar]

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    Communicating with Families and Children in Correctional Facilities [Webinar]

    This webinar was created for the Family Connections Project. On April 16, 2020, the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) presented a 1.5-hour training webinar on strategies for staff to communicate with families and children in correctional facilities.
    This webinar covered four major topics:
    •    Communication 101: Basic Types and Everyday Challenges
    •    Points of Contact and Communication with Families in Correctional Facilities
    •    Best Practices on Communication and Active Listening
    •    Tips for Staff on Interacting with Families and Children in Correctional Facilities

    Webinar
  • (PH)REAL: PHilosophy, Relationship, Equipping, Attitude and Leadership

    (PH)REAL: PHilosophy, Relationship, Equipping, Attitude and Leadership

    Did you know that 99% of all leadership occurs not from the TOP but from the MIDDLE of an organization? Join the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) to explore the qualities of effective leaders at all levels and the essential skills necessary to flourish in one’s own management style while respecting organizational structure and mission. Through a series of interactive activities, we will explore how current and future leaders can bring relevant tools, values, and influence to and from every level of a correctional organization. 

    Webinar
    Streaming Video
  • Correctional Officer Suicide Annotated Bibliography

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    Correctional Officer Suicide Annotated Bibliography

    Recognizing that corrections can be a tough profession, the National Institute of Corrections is at the forefront of Health and Wellness for Corrections Professionals. The NIC website has a wealth of resources on the topic including webinars, a virtual conference dedicated to the subject, as well as an Internet Broadcast called Corrections Stress: Peaks and Valleys. The literature on the subject reflects what those who work in the field already know anecdotally, that the job of a correctional officer is particularly stressful. Officers must contend with rotating work schedules, mandatory overtime, and possible assaults by and among offenders. The following articles and discussion provide an overview of what information is available on suicide by correctional officers and—to some extent—police officers, and the impact workplace stress can have on officers. In response to the literature search, officer wellness is discussed, along with some of the interventions recommended to prevent suicides and reduce corrections fatigue.

    Document
  • National Institute of Corrections Report to the Nation FY 2017: Partners for Change

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    National Institute of Corrections Report to the Nation FY 2017: Partners for Change

    This report presents the activity of the National Institute of Corrections over Fiscal Year 2017. The National Institute of Corrections is a federal agency, but its work extends far beyond Washington. We go deep into communities, partnering with stakeholders hand in hand. We serve the country through comprehensive corrections-specific training, individualized technical assistance, and access to the largest library for corrections resources in the world. These tools, coupled with our experienced and dedicated staff, can help jurisdictions plan for the building of new correctional facilities, implement systemwide programs, or even foster the development of a new generation of competent leaders in the field.

    Document
  • 2018 Corrections Environmental Scan

    A screenshot of the Corrections Environmental Scan Website
    2018 Corrections Environmental Scan

    Now in its thirteenth edition, an updated online version of the Corrections Environment Scan is presented for the first time. Renamed the Corrections Environmental Scan in 2017, it continues to evolve into a popular tool that corrections practitioners use to inform their work in jails, prisons, and community supervision.

    The report is arranged into five topics: Population Demographics, Economy, Workforce, Technology, and Statistics, with the special highlighted topic: Criminal Justice Reform. The Corrections Environmental Scan is intended to give a broad overview of the latest news and trends in these topics, from the corrections, domestic and global perspective.

    Web Page
  • Model Practices for Parents in Prisons and Jails: Reducing Barriers to Family Connections

    Model Practices for Parents in Prisons and Jails: Reducing Barriers to Family Connections

    The objective of this document is to detail a set of practices that correctional administrators can implement to remove barriers that inhibit children from cultivating or maintaining relationships with their incarcerated parents during and immediately after incarceration. This handbook contains ten chapters: partnership building; training and core competencies; intake and assessment; family notification and information provision; classes and groups; visitor lobbies; visiting; parent-child communication; caregiver support; family-focused reentry.

    Document
  • Paving the Way: Lessons Learned in Sentinel Events Reviews

    Paving the Way: Lessons Learned in Sentinel Events Reviews

    This report reviews the lessons learned by three forward-leaning teams in their review of a negative criminal justice outcome ("sentinel event") in their jurisdictions. The project represents the next step in NIJ's exploration of the feasibility of using sentinel event reviews as a way to learn from errors in the criminal justice system. See also 029617.

    Document
  • Best Practices in the Assessment, Treatment, and Risk Management of Persons Who Have Sexually Offended

    Best Practices in the Assessment, Treatment, and Risk Management of Persons Who Have Sexually Offended

    The assessment, treatment, and risk management of persons who have sexually offended is of considerable interest to a wide variety of stakeholder groups, including legislators and policymakers, court and law enforcement personnel, corrections and community supervision staff, mental health clinicians, victim advocates, and the community-at-large, among others. Many of these stakeholders have expressed concerns regarding the potential for sexual recidivism and other harms posed by offenders released to the community. As a consequence, most jurisdictions have enacted legislative frameworks to manage those risks.

    The past 40 years have been witness to significant growth in our understanding of the dynamics of sexual offending, the people who engage in these behaviors and how best to assess their risk for reoffending, and what treatment and supervision interventions are most likely to result in success. In this context, success may be defined as: (1) greater community safety, and (2) safe and humane reintegration opportunities for offenders returning to the community.

    This report is intended to provide a comprehensive review of best practices in the assessment, treatment, and risk management of persons who have sexually offended. 

    Document
  • Prescription Drugs of Abuse and Misuse in Jails and Prisons [Webinar]

    Prescription Drugs of Abuse and Misuse in Jails and Prisons [Webinar]

    Are you and your agency knowledgeable of commonly abused and/or misused prescription medications in correctional settings? Have you considered prescription drugs which can be used as weapons? If you are interested in learning from pharmacists from the largest correctional system in the United States as well as a state department of corrections, come and join NIC for this interactive one (1) hour webinar!Through a series of interactive activities, including polling and chat, we will explore how the Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) Health Services Division and the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services (DPSCS) is addressing these challenges. Additionally, this webinar is an overview of BOP’s Drugs of Abuse & Misuse Initiative. During the webinar, participants will have the opportunity to hear from pharmacists in BOP facilities and the Maryland DPSCS on how they are addressing this ongoing challenge.

    Webinar
  • Assessment, Your Library, and Your Collections [Webinar]

    Assessment, Your Library, and Your Collections [Webinar]

    Expanding on Ranganathan’s five laws, we know that libraries are for use and that every library has its community (users). In order to ensure that a library is meeting the needs of its users, the library must be able to assess its services, including its collections, and understand how those are meeting the requirements of its community. This webinar will investigate the assessment activities that a library can utilize to determine the needs of its community, as well as those assessments which can help a library assure that a service is meeting its community’s desires. Specific assessments, which can be completed in any type of environment, will be discussed and examples given.

    Webinar
  • Law Enforcement Officers Respecting Service, Restoring Honor for Vets in Crisis

    Law Enforcement Officers Respecting Service, Restoring Honor for Vets in Crisis

    This white paper is based on a series of interviews, buttressed by personal observations, of key players in several jurisdictions where law enforcement officers, Veteran Justice Outreach Specialists from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), and community-based agency representatives collaborate to implement approaches to de-escalate veterans in crisis in our communities. These programs are improving public safety. They are creating opportunities for veterans struggling to re-acclimate to civilian life. These traumatized men- and increasingly women- receive the help they need to address mental health issues, such as post-traumatic stress disorder or traumatic brain injury, related to their military service.

    This is the third publication in the National Institute of Corrections justice-involved veterans compendium project. It shares the views of law enforcement programs at several locations across the country, from small towns to large cities, and highlights how each jurisdiction went about creating and implementing teams or programs to improve practices meant to serve veterans who are in crisis.

    Veteran Response Teams are improving outcomes for these veterans and minimizing hostile and sometimes volatile situations for both law enforcement officers and veterans. This paper shares the views of police officers, sheriff’s deputies, corrections professionals, representatives from the VA and other community-based treatment providers, each of whom, in their own words, have stories to tell.

    Document
  • Assessing Learning in Your Library [Webinar]

    Assessing Learning in Your Library [Webinar]

    This Session took place on November 13, 2018, 2 pm EST.

    A 2016 report sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education noted that incarcerated adults with access to library services other than a law library scored higher in literacy and numeracy than incarcerated adults without access on a survey conducted by the Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies. While the study does not address why or how library services played a role in the success of incarcerated adults, it does highlight the question. In fact, the effect of library services on learning is an issue that academic libraries have attempted to address for years. In this DDLC webinar series session, representatives from the National Institute for Learning Outcomes and the Association of College Research Libraries share how their organizations have been tackling the issue.

    NILOA begins by providing an introduction on current practices and future trends in assessing and documenting learning. They then uncover efforts that are unfolding to capture and document evidence of student learning outside of traditional curricular experiences. ACRL will then explain how they have been focusing on helping academic libraries and librarians demonstrate alignment with and impact on institutional outcomes.

    By the end of this session, you learn how academic libraries have approached assessment in recent years and examine how some of these efforts may be adapted for use in a correctional setting.

     

    Webinar
  • Offender Use of the Library [Webinar]

    Offender Use of the Library [Webinar]

    Webinar held July 18, 2018.

    Dr. Jane Garner presents the details and findings of a recent doctoral study that focused on the experiences of using libraries in prisons from the prisoner perspective. Her presentation explains the reasons why this study was undertaken, the research methodology and methods, and the major findings. The study found that libraries in prisons can have a positive influence on prisoner education, behavior management, and personal transformations as well as support positive links to communities and families outside prison. The study provides ample evidence of the positive experiences offered by prison libraries. Dr. Garner discusses the importance of data-driven studies, such as her own in examining and understanding the role of libraries in prisons. Her study demonstrates that prison libraries have the potential to contribute positively to offender outcomes, both during their time in prison, and in their lives upon release, and that these benefits can flow on to the families of prisoners and to the broader community.

    Webinar
  • Working Effectively with the Law Library [Webinar]

    Working Effectively with the Law Library [Webinar]

    Webinar held May 2, 2018

    Blythe Balistrieri discusses the ways in which the general correctional library and law libraries can partner, the challenges correctional librarians must negotiate daily, and how to streamline correctional library operations. Her presentation covers some of the history of correctional libraries, challenges that these libraries can face, and how librarians can work to alleviate some of them. Professor Balestrieri listed five actions that correctional library staff can take to combat some of their challenges: Advocacy, Communication, Education, Training and Team Building. Makes reference to court cases Bounds v. Smith, Thornburgh v. Abbot, Lewis v. Casey.

    Webinar
    Streaming Video
  • Preventing and Controlling Hepatitis A in Jails and Prisons [Webinar]

    Preventing and Controlling Hepatitis A in Jails and Prisons [Webinar]

    Join the National Institute of Corrections (NIC), Federal Bureau of Prisons (FBOP) and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) to learn about how current community hepatitis A outbreaks are affecting correctional jurisdictions, and how you can prevent cases from becoming outbreaks in your own facilities.

    Webinar
  • Training from A (Analysis) to E (Evaluation) ‐ Are You Applying the Science of Learning and Performance? [Webinar]

    Training from A (Analysis) to E (Evaluation) ‐ Are You Applying the Science of Learning and Performance? [Webinar]

    This webinar is an overview of NIC’s white paper Training from A to E: Analysis to Evaluation (032740) on learning and performance, and its application to corrections training. During the webinar, participants had the opportunity to engage in activities to apply learning and performance research to the training they analyze, design, develop, implement and evaluate in their own organization. There is a transcript available for the webinar.

     

     

     

     

     

    Webinar

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