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  • The Leader’s Dilemma: How to Balance Two Important Needs [Webinar]

    The Leader’s Dilemma: How to Balance Two Important Needs [Webinar]

    Have you ever struggled to decide whether it is more important to support your people or your agency? On the one hand, you want to do the right thing to take care of those on the frontline, but you’ve also got to make sure that the work gets done. Most supervisors, managers, and executives have encountered this dilemma.

    In fact, it’s a commonly mentioned concern in management training classes. In this webinar, Dr. Ed Sherman will discuss the balance between productivity and ensuring that employees have the assistance and resources that are necessary to function effectively. While sometimes considered as being in opposition to one another, these two needs can and should exist in a parallel, complimentary manner to produce the best possible outcomes, as will become evident during this training.

    Take Aways:

    Achieve agency goals and objectives while concurrently supporting staff members to maximize cooperation, morale, and productivity.

    • Enhance methods of workplace communication and interaction.
    • Identify and resolve concerns and issues before they escalate.
    • Increase staff commitment, involvement, and participation.

    Presenter:

    Ed Sherman, Psy.D.,
    Principal Managing Partner, Sherman Consulting
    Dr. Ed Sherman is an organizational consultant, executive coach, and leadership development specialist. He received his Doctorate in Clinical Psychology from Alliant International University, California School of Professional Psychology in San Diego, and holds Master’s degrees in management and psychology. Dr. Sherman has 40 years of experience in public safety having served as a law enforcement officer, firefighter, and paramedic. He worked for many years in the law enforcement profession in San Diego in various assignments including serving as a Criminal Intelligence Supervisor for the California Department of Justice. Dr. Sherman has provided services to both public and private entities such as after-action reviews, assessments, training, team building, and process improvement facilitation for staff at all levels.

    Webinar
  • National Institute of Corrections Report to the Nation FY 2021

    National Institute of Corrections Report to the Nation FY 2021

    This report presents the activity of the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) over Fiscal Year 2021. Some of the achievements highlighted are numerous technological advances and modernization of NIC curricula.

    Document
  • Veteran Intercepts in the Criminal Justice System [Webinar]

    Veterans Intercepts Webinar
    Veteran Intercepts in the Criminal Justice System [Webinar]

    Develop a better understanding of the Veteran Sequential Intercept Model (V-SIM) and the intervention strategies and resources available at each intercept in part one of NIC’s four-part series highlighting reentry, diversion, and desistance alternatives for justice-involved veterans as they progress through the criminal justice system. Veterans transitioning from the military to civilian life may have unique underlying conditions, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, and other veteran-specific mental health concerns. The SIM delineates interventions at distinct stages of the criminal justice system that have been recognized to assist in addressing the underlying needs of veterans with service-related mental health issues. If veterans with these conditions get involved with the criminal justice system, it can result in complex and challenging situations.

    Agencies that recognize the distinctive qualities associated with military service and the abundant resources available to those who have served can significantly foster future success for veterans and may help prevent their further involvement in the justice system. This webinar will introduce the NIC webinar series “Veteran Intercepts in the Criminal Justice System” and summarize how the V-SIM works.

    During this 90-minute interactive webinar, participants will:

    • Receive an introduction and overview of the V-SIM and Intercepts 0-5;
    • Learn about the intent and purpose of the V-SIM along with strategies and examples of what success looks like at each intercept; and
    • Gain an understanding of the most current veteran-specific resources available to communities and criminal justice agencies at each intercept.

    Speakers:

    • Dr. Blake Harris - Director, Veterans Mental Health Department, Texas Veterans Commission
    • Malik Muhammad - Major, Orange County Corrections Department, Florida
    • Patricia Ceballos - Reentry Services Manager, San Diego Sheriff’s Office, California
    • Evan Seamone - Veterans and Servicemembers Legal Clinic, University of Florida, Levin College
    • Honorable Judge Michael Jackson - (ret) Veterans Treatment Court, Cuyahoga County, Ohio
    • Sean Clark - Director, Veterans Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
    • Jac Charlier - Executive Director, Police, Treatment, and Community Collaborative (PTACC)
    • Jessica Blue-Howells - Deputy National Director, Veterans Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
    • Gregory Crawford - Correctional Program Specialist, U.S. Department of Justice, National Institute of Corrections

     

     

    Webinar
  • Current and Innovative Practices in Reducing Staff Trauma and Organizational Stress in Corrections for Correctional Officers [Webinar]

    Reducing Staff Trauma and Organizational Stress in Corrections for Correctional Officers
    Current and Innovative Practices in Reducing Staff Trauma and Organizational Stress in Corrections for Correctional Officers [Webinar]

    Correctional Leaders and Administrators: As a correctional leader you have an instrumental role in supporting the health and well-being of your workforce. Learn more about the latest innovative practices in reducing staff trauma and organizational stress in corrections in this webinar hosted by the National Institute of Corrections (NIC).
    Correctional staff working in jails and prisons are at risk for adverse mental health sequelae, including stress, burnout, and psychological distress from traumatic events experienced on the job. Published literature and practices offer a variety of ways to provide staff with resources to reduce severe distress.
    This webinar will present the findings from a two-year cooperative agreement with NIC and national correctional stakeholders. Presenters will share current and best practices and propose innovative solutions to reduce correctional staff trauma and organizational stress in U.S. jail and prison settings based on the findings from a scoping review and national survey.

    Correctional Officers: As a correctional officer you have an instrumental role in participating in and informing workforce health and well-being practices. In this webinar hosted by the National Institute of Corrections, you will learn more about innovative practices that you can use to reduce the effect of staff trauma and organizational stress in your daily work. You will also learn how you, as a correctional officer, can inform participatory activities and use resources for your personal health.
    Correctional officers working jails and prisons are at risk for adverse mental health sequelae, including stress, burnout, and psychological distress from traumatic events experienced on the job. Published literature and practices offer a variety of ways to provide correctional officers with resources to reduce severe distress.

    This webinar will present the findings from a two-year cooperative agreement with NIC and national correctional stakeholders. Presenters will share current and best practices and propose innovative solutions to reduce correctional staff trauma and organizational stress in U.S. jail and prison settings based on the findings from a scoping review and national survey.

    • Identify best practices that fit your workplace to address staff trauma and organizational stress based on evidence.
    • Identify national commonly used programs (policies, practices, peer support, and training) to address staff trauma organizational stress and their usefulness for correctional staff.
    • Understand the difference in attitudes among correctional staff, correctional middle managers, and senior administrators’ attitudes on the fit and use of programs (policies, practices, peer support, and training) designed to address staff trauma organizational stress.

    Presented By:

    • Blinda D. Stewart - National Institute of Corrections
    • Dena M. Owens, Psy.D. - National Institute of Corrections
    • Dr. Mazen El Ghaziri, PhD, MPH, RN - University of Massachusetts
    • Dr. Lisa Jaegers, PhD, OTR/L - Saint Louis University
    • Dr. Martin G. Cherniack, MD, MPH - University of Connecticut Health Center (UCHC)
    • Pamela Fallon, APRN-BC,COHN-S - University of Massachusetts
    Webinar
  • Corrections Environmental Scan 2021

    Corrections Environmental Scan 2021

    This report gives a broad overview of selected current trends. It can used by corrections professional to inform their work.

    Now in its 16th edition, an updated online version of the Corrections Environmental Scan 2021 is presented here. Renamed the Corrections Environmental Scan in 2017, it continues to evolve into a popular tool that corrections practitioners use to inform their work in jails, prisons, and community supervision.

    The report is arranged into five topics: Population Demographics, Economy, Workforce, Technology, and Statistics, with the special highlighted topic: Coronavirus. The Corrections Environmental Scan is intended to give a broad overview of the latest news and trends in these topics, from the corrections, domestic, and global perspectives.

    Web Page
  • 2020 Corrections Environmental Scan

    2020 Corrections Environmental Scan

    Now in its 15th edition, an updated online version of the Corrections Environment Scan is presented here. Renamed the Corrections Environmental Scan in 2017, it continues to evolve into a popular tool that corrections practitioners use to inform their work in jails, prisons, and community supervision.

    The report is arranged into five topics: Population Demographics, Economy, Workforce, Technology, and Statistics, with the special highlighted topic: Justice Involved Women. The Corrections Environmental Scan is intended to give a broad overview of the latest news and trends in these topics, from the corrections, domestic, and global perspectives.

    This report gives a broad overview of selected current trends. It can used by corrections professional to inform their work.

     

    Web Page
  • Promoting Pretrial Success: A New Model for Pretrial Supervision

    Promoting Pretrial Success: A New Model for Pretrial Supervision

    Pretrial supervision is a critical function of most pretrial services agencies. Unfortunately, most pretrial supervision strategies and conditions are not supported by research. Pretrial services agencies often recommend—and courts order—conditions that are inconsistent with the goals of promoting court appearance and arrest-free behavior. This can expose individuals who would otherwise comply with these goals to bail revocations due to technical violations.

    This publication describes the elements of a "success-based" pretrial supervision protocol that emphasizes successful outcomes as a goal, encourages individualized conditions of supervision, and includes interventions to deal with court nonappearance. It also gives practical examples of how pretrial agencies can implement these elements.

    Document
  • Incorporating Services and Support into Pretrial Supervision: Is There a Best Model?

    Incorporating Services and Support into Pretrial Supervision: Is There a Best Model?

    Behavioral health and social service needs are common in most arrest populations. For most individuals, these needs will not interfere with making court appearances and remaining arrest-free before trial. However, need can escalate into a heightened risk of pretrial misconduct for some people. This publication discusses the complexity of managing substance use disorder—a prevalent need in most arrest populations—and suggests a “pretrial intervention services” model that outlines when pretrial agencies should consider services, when services should be integrated into supervision support, and what treatment service strategies are best at the pretrial stage.

    Document
  • Court Nonappearance and New Case Filings: Redefining Pretrial Misconduct

    Court Nonappearance and New Case Filings: Redefining Pretrial Misconduct

    The past two decades have enhanced our understanding of pretrial risk. We now know that most individuals with pending criminal cases make scheduled court appearances and remain arrest-free as they await trial. When missed court dates occur, they often are not intentional abscondence but rather the result of unintentional or unavoidable circumstances. Further, most new cases filed against pretrial defendants involve misdemeanors and lower-level felony charges, not violent crimes.

    However, while we recognize the infrequent and dynamic nature of pretrial misconduct, most justice systems define, and measure missed court appearances using the dated and overly broad “failure to appear” descriptor and view new case filings mostly as serious offenses affecting public safety. The result is an overestimation of defendant risk and overly punitive responses to misconduct.

    This publication discusses the nature of pretrial risk, missed court dates, and new case filings. It also proposes more accurate and useful definitions for these events and presents strategies used nationwide to help prevent misconduct or to mitigate it when it occurs.

    Document
  • Veterans Reentry Programming

    Veterans Reentry Programming
    Veterans Reentry Programming

    Supporting Transition to Civilian Life Across the Sequential Intercept Model

    They were veterans before they were incarcerated individuals. That is the sentiment and approach to veterans reentry of Sharon Kirkpatrick, member of the Washington Women Veterans Advisory Committee. Upon meeting with a veteran for the first time, she begins by acknowledging their military service, both because she honors their sacrifice and because the veterans need to hear and embrace these words for themselves. Helping veterans understand that they are more than their criminal charge is the first step to helping them see beyond their current circumstances and guiding them along the path of reentry.

    Document
  • Community Supervision Peer Support Program

    Community Supervision Peer Support Program webinar
    Community Supervision Peer Support Program

    The largest and most important agency resource is its staff. The development of employees is a significant investment of time and training dollars. Is your investment protected from the wear and tear of the job? Staff experience unique stressors on the job, which may include secondary trauma and/or direct trauma during critical incidents and their aftermath. Peer support programs in community supervision allow agencies to address this trauma with a planned approach that gives staff an important resource to cope with these issues. This webinar will introduce the National Institute of Corrections Guidelines for Peer Support Programs in Community Supervision Settings. Experienced practitioners will join to share how peer support is being used in the field to improve the health and wellbeing of their greatest resource – personnel.

    • Gain an understanding of the current research on vicarious/secondary trauma experienced by staff.
    • Discover the main components of a peer support program and how they can benefit an agency.
    • Receive information on the Guidelines for Peer Support Programs in Community Supervision with real-world application.

    Presented by:

    LORIE BRISBIN, Correctional Program Specialist, National Institute of Corrections

    KRISTINA BRYANT, Principal Court Management Consultant, National Center for State Court

    TARA KUNKEL, Executive Director, Rulo Strategies

    MARY ROCHE, Director, Office of Victim and Restorative Justice Programs

    KRISTI WARD, Division Director, Maricopa County Adult Probation

    Webinar
  • The Road Home: An ICAOS Documentary

    The Road Home poster
    The Road Home: An ICAOS Documentary

    Follow six individuals as they navigate the winding road from incarceration across state lines to community supervision closer to home. They are transfer candidates of the Interstate Compact, a collection of regulations and rules guiding the movement of individuals who have been incarcerated miles from home. The compact gives them the chance to serve the remainder of their sentences among family and social supports, which have been shown to have a positive effect on reducing the likelihood of an individual committing future crime.

    This one-hour documentary tells the story of the compact through the lives of men and women from around the country as they navigate the transfer process in real time. Each person has a different story, a different crime, and unusual circumstances that affect their eligibility to transfer based on compact rules. As we follow them through the process, we hear from family members and others as they describe how the compact has affected them personally and how their lives might change if only their father, mother, brother, or wife can finally come home.

    Connecting the film to the past and future of criminal justice are interviews with correctional leaders who maintain and are variously involved with the compact. Featured are representatives from the state and local correctional agencies from which the transfer candidates originate, executives from the Interstate Commission for Adult Offender Supervision (ICAOS), and present and former staff of the National Institute of Corrections (NIC). Highlights include conversations with:

    • George Keiser, former Chief, Community Corrections Division, NIC
    • Pat Tuthill, victims’ rights and ICAOS advocate
    • Ashley Lippert, Executive Director, ICAOS
    • Jeremiah Stromberg, Chair, ICAOS

    The purpose of the film is to entertain as well as educate viewers about ICAOS and the workings of this aspect of the criminal justice system. It is an engaging, eye-opening cinematic experience that uncovers the complexities of the transfer process and the tremendous effect its success can have on individuals and their families. Victims’ rights and historic improvements in victim and community safety are also addressed.   

    NIC encourages correctional educators to use this film in the classroom as a conversation starter and teaching tool with students and staff. Correctional facilities may also use the film to give incarcerated individuals an honest picture of what they might expect if they choose to participate in the interstate compact transfer process themselves. Local leaders and stakeholders can use the film to discuss how supervision and transfers might affect the broader community.

    NIC DISCLAIMER

    This documentary was funded by the National Institute of Corrections, U.S. Department of Justice. Points of view or opinions stated in this documentary are those of the authors/producers/participants and do not necessarily represent the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice. The National Institute of Corrections reserves the right to reproduce, publish, translate, or otherwise use and to authorize others to publisher and use all or any part of the copyrighted material contained in this publication.

    ICAOS DISCLAIMER

    The Interstate Commission for Adult Offender Supervision is a quasi-governmental administrative body vested with broad regulatory authority and responsibility to administer the Interstate Compact for Adult Offender Supervision. The opinions, beliefs, and viewpoints expressed in the foregoing production are those of the individual speakers and do not necessarily reflect or represent the opinions, beliefs, and viewpoints held by ICAOS or any official ICAOS policy.

    For 2-Minute Trailer Click Here. Full Video Below

    Video
    Streaming Video
  • Family Connections in Correctional Facilities: Informational Webinar on TTA Opportunity [Webinar]

    Family Connections in Correctional Facilities: Informational Webinar on TTA Opportunity [Webinar]

    This webinar took place August 28, 2018. The Family Connections in Correctional Facilities Project is intended to advance practices that foster contact and communication between parents experiencing incarceration and their children and family members by: developing a set of low-cost, high-impact correctional practices to reduce barriers to family connections and contact; working with select facilities to implement these practices; documenting how these practices can be implemented and are related to parent, family, and system outcomes. Participation in the Family Connections in Correctional Facilities Project provides an opportunity for correctional facilities to receive training and technical assistance for implementing practices geared to helping parents who are incarcerated maintain communication and contact with their children.

    The presenters were as follows: Rachel Brushett, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Assistance, US Department of Justice Hilary Cuthrell, National Institute of Corrections, US Department of Justice Bryce Peterson, Senior Research Associate, Justice Policy Center, Urban Institute Jocelyn Fontaine, Senior Research Fellow, Justice Policy Center, Urban Institute Lindsey Cramer, Research Associate, Justice Policy Center, Urban Institute Alina Martinez, Lead Coordinator, One Family Program, Community Works West

    Webinar
  • National Survey of Criminal Justice Coordinating Councils

    National Survey of Criminal Justice Coordinating Councils

    This publication presents findings from a national survey of criminal justice coordinating council (CJCC) directors and members. It is one of a series of publications aimed at enhancing the literature about CJCCs and highlighting their purpose and value in shaping local justice systems.

    The survey findings are intended to broaden our knowledge about CJCCs and to (1) assist jurisdictions interested in forming a coordinating council or (2) help existing CJCCs strengthen their council.

    Document
  • Perceptions of Criminal Justice Coordinating Council

    Perceptions of Criminal Justice Coordinating Council

    Criminal justice coordinating councils (CJCCs) emerged in the 1970s and 80s as a means for systemic collaboration to improve the justice system. To date, however, there has been little research on these entities. To address this knowledge gap, Justice Management Institute surveyed CJCC members nationwide to understand what value these professionals experience through their CJCC membership and the benefits that CJCCs bring to their jurisdictions. This publication, developed with funding from the National Institute of Corrections, presents findings from that survey.

    Document
  • Community Supervision Peer Support Program Guidelines

    Community Supervision Peer Support Program Guidelines

    The Community Supervision Peer Support Program Guidelines were developed by community supervision leaders, front-line officers, and peer team support members operating peer support programs in community-based supervision agencies within the United States. The guidelines are intended to support community supervision agencies, including probation, parole, and pretrial service agencies, in creating and maintaining peer support programs. The guidelines reflect the commonly accepted practices within community-based supervision agencies at publication. The guidelines should be aligned with state-specific requirements (e.g., confidentiality laws and union contracts).

    Document
  • Dosage Probation: A Prescription Based on Two Pilot Sites’ Experiences

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    Dosage Probation: A Prescription Based on Two Pilot Sites’ Experiences

    The dosage probation model suggests that the length of supervision should be determined by the number of hours of intervention necessary to reduce risk as opposed to a standard probation term, such as 3, 4, 5, etc., years. Dosage probation is designed to incentivize behavior change by providing an opportunity for the individual under supervision to receive early termination from probation if they successfully engage in risk reduction interventions tailored to their criminogenic needs, in a “dose” matched to their risk level.

    This document provides background information on the dosage probation project; a summary of the literature pertinent to dosage; and information about the dosage pilot sites, including key lessons that emerged from the pilot project. It also

    Document
  • Managing Substance Withdrawal in Jails: A Legal Brief (2022)

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    Managing Substance Withdrawal in Jails: A Legal Brief (2022)

    The Bureau of Justice Assistance and the National Institute of Corrections collaborated on a brief that describes the scope of the challenges facing jail administrators related to substance use withdrawal and the high potential for it to lead to deaths. The document provides an overview of constitutional rights and key legislation related to substance use withdrawal, outlining steps for creating a comprehensive response for individuals with substance use disorders in a jail setting.

    Document
  • Community Supervision Staff Trauma and Organizational Stress: Summary of Findings

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    Community Supervision Staff Trauma and Organizational Stress: Summary of Findings

    In 2021, Rulo Strategies, in collaboration with the National Center for State Courts, completed a literature review, the results of which were summarized in a white paper submitted to the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) in August 2021.
    In addition to writing the white paper, the team conducted a needs assessment in April 2021.
    This is a brief summary of the findings from both of those publications.

    Please see related publications: Community Supervision Operational and Organizational Stress: White Paper (033335) and Community Supervision Staff Trauma and Organizational Stress Needs Assessment (033336).

    Document
  • Community Supervision Staff Trauma and Organizational Stress Needs Assessment

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    Community Supervision Staff Trauma and Organizational Stress Needs Assessment

    This needs assessment was developed by Rulo Strategies LLC and the National Center for State Courts with the support of the National Institute of Corrections (NIC). The needs assessment was deployed as part of a cooperative agreement designed to develop responses to staff trauma and organizational stress in community supervision agencies. The information gathered in this assessment is designed to accomplish the following:
    a) determine what strategies community supervision agencies are using to mitigate and respond to staff trauma, organizational stress, and build staff resiliency;
    b) identify innovative and promising practices that can be replicated;
    c) identify training or technical assistance needs that could be addressed with the support of NIC.

    Please see related publications: Community Supervision Operational and Organizational Stress: White Paper (033335) and Community Supervision Staff Trauma and Organizational Stress: Summary of Findings (033337).

    Document
  • Community Supervision Operational and Organizational Stress: White Paper

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    Community Supervision Operational and Organizational Stress: White Paper

    Community supervision officers work with individuals under supervision for a sustained period of time, placing officers in a situation where they are exposed to considerable stress and secondary trauma. While a great deal of research has been conducted on risk/need factors and supervision outcomes of individuals served by these agencies, less is known about community supervision officers themselves and how they manage the stress associated with their position. This White Paper examines the stress experienced by community supervision officers.

    Please see related publications: Community Supervision Staff Trauma and Organizational Stress Needs Assessment (033336) and Community Supervision Staff Trauma and Organizational Stress: Summary of Findings (033337)

    Document
  • Corrections Environmental Scan

    image of corrections environmental scan
    Corrections Environmental Scan

    Now in its 15th edition, an updated online version of the Corrections Environment Scan is presented here. Renamed the Corrections Environmental Scan in 2017, it continues to evolve into a popular tool that corrections practitioners use to inform their work in jails, prisons, and community supervision.

    The report is arranged into five topics: Population Demographics, Economy, Workforce, Technology, and Statistics, with the special highlighted topic: Coronavirus. The Corrections Environmental Scan is intended to give a broad overview of the latest news and trends in these topics, from the corrections, domestic, and global perspectives.

    Web Page
  • Understanding Veteran-Specific Resources Available to Both Veterans and Criminal Justice Agencies

    Understanding Veteran-Specific Resources Available to Both Veterans and Criminal Justice Agencies

    Do you want to develop a better understanding of the veteran-specific resources available to both criminal justice agencies and to veterans? Would you like to improve your knowledge of the support available to criminal justice agencies to help build veterans’ programming? Veterans transitioning from the military to the civilian world may have unique underlying conditions, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, and other veteran-specific mental health concerns.  If veterans with these conditions get involved with the criminal justice system, it can result in complex and challenging situations. Fortunately, there are veteran-specific resources available for use throughout the justice system continuum.  Agencies that recognize the distinctive qualities associated with military service and the abundant resources available to those who have served can significantly foster future success for these veterans as they navigate the criminal justice system and return to being productive members of society. Veteran-specific resources are being used by the field and are helping agencies with their programmatic efforts to help reduce recidivism for justice-involved veterans, improve public safety, and improve outcomes for veterans. 

    Learning Objectives:

    • During this 90-minute interactive webinar, participants will:
    • Develop an understanding of resources available to veterans and criminal justice agencies;
    • Learn about outreach, assessment, referral, and links to services and how to partner with federal agencies to build programs for veterans.
    • Get tips on how to request technical assistance and access resources from the National Institute of Corrections.

    Original broadcast: November 9, 2021 10am PT / 11am MT / 12pm CT / 1pm ET for 90 minutes.

     

    Streaming Video
  • Corrections Stress Needs Assessment

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    Corrections Stress Needs Assessment

    The field of corrections has long been recognized as a high stress profession. Previous research suggests that individuals who work in either institutional settings (i.e., prison, jail, juvenile detention) and/or community corrections (i.e., probation, parole, pretrial services) experience varying degrees of occupational, organizational, and traumatic stressors. If left unaddressed, corrections stress can lead to an assortment of personal and professional problems that could result in high staff turnover and vacancies, which in turn, jeopardize safety and effective programing. The National Institution of Corrections (NIC) invests in developing data-driven initiatives and solutions to assist jurisdictions in identifying and addressing the issues that contribute to corrections stress and create practices that help to maintain a healthy and productive work force. To guide development of initiatives and sustainable practices, KSL Research, Training, & Consultation LLC (KSL) conducted a needs assessment as part of a cooperative agreement with NIC. This assessment collected data from over 3,000 individuals across the United States who were employed in corrections. The assessment revealed several areas that NIC can potentially address through training and education programs.

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  • Collaborative Case Work with Justice Involved Women

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    Collaborative Case Work with Justice Involved Women

    This report provides a description of the Collaborative Case Work Model for Justice-Involved Women (CCW-W), previously known as the Women Offender Case Management Model (WOCMM). CCW-W is an intensive casework model that was developed specifically for justice-involved women. Since the first pilot of this model by the State of Connecticut Judicial Branch/Court Services Division, CCW-W has demonstrated favorable outcomes in several settings. It is now being implemented in Connecticut, Iowa, Maine and Larimer County in Colorado.

    Document
  • Measuring What Matters: Outcome and Performance Measures for the Pretrial Services Field [Webinar]

    Measuring What Matters: Outcome and Performance Measures for the Pretrial Services Field [Webinar]

    Like its previous edition, Measuring What Matters, Second Edition helps agencies gather consistent and meaningful data to track the performance of pretrial programs based on the mission and needs of their local criminal justice system.

    The second edition emphasizes measures that “work” in the real world and introduces a new definition of what it means to be successful in pretrial services. Each measure ties to the three principles of bail—maximizing release, ensuring court appearance, and maintaining public safety—and features commentary discussing how the measure has changed over time based on changes in the pretrial field. Today’s pretrial service agencies use outcome and performance metrics as an integral part of their pretrial practice and training. With the development of professional standards for the pretrial services field comes the need to have measures that will help them meet the challenge.

    This webinar introduces NIC’s new publication and highlights key defining outcome and performance measures for pretrial agencies. The session will also describe how to tie the key measures to the three principles of bail: maximizing release, court appearance, and public safety.

    Learning Objectives:

    During this 90-minute interactive webinar, participants will:

    • Be introduced to Measuring What Matters: Outcome and Performance Measures for the Pretrial Services Field, Second Edition
    • Highlight key defining outcome and performance measures and supporting business practices
    • Describe how to tie the key measures to the three principles of bail: maximizing release, court appearance, and public safety
    • Provide specific site examples of jurisdictions implementing key measures and sharing successes, challenges, and lessons learned

    This webinar originally aired on September 21, 2021 at 10am PT / 11am MT /12pm CT / 1pm ET for 90 minutes.

    Speakers

    • Greg Crawford, Correctional Program Specialist, National Institute of Corrections
    • Spurgeon Kennedy, President-Elect, National Association of Pretrial Service Agencies
    • Barb Hankey, Manager, Oakland County Community Corrections, Michigan


    Panel Members

    • Jessica Beach, Community Justice Director, Yamhill County, Oregon
    • Kelly Bradford, Statewide Pretrial Program Manager, Administrative Office of the Courts, New Mexico
    • Domingo Corona, Director of Pretrial Services, Pima County, Arizona
    • Janice Dean, Pretrial Services Director, 5th Judicial District of Pennsylvania
    • Rhonda Frank-Loron, Pretrial Program Manager, Madison, Wisconsin

     

    Streaming Video
  • Learning to Drive Meaningful Change

    Learning to Drive Meaningful Change

    Every leader must be a change agent to survive and thrive. Great leadership goes beyond transforming yourself and others; it also involves changing your organization. Driving meaningful change in your department or correctional institution does not happen overnight.

    It requires a strong leader who acts as an agent of change with the desire to collaborate and the heart to identify and implement sustainable solutions for organizational improvement. In this webinar, you will explore how you push past the paradigm that says, “That’s the way we’ve always done it.” To change behavior, you must be a leader who can affect change in people’s behavior. Tools and techniques for effectively leading change will be introduced, and you will be challenged to identify one or more initiatives that you can undertake to move your organization to the next level.

    Takeaways

    • Shifting from transactional to transformational leadership is the key to taking your department, institution, or agency to the next level.
    • Change agents have the ability to manage crisis and readily adapt to shifting conditions in the workplace.
    • Sustainable change involves looking at the entire system and not just the individual parts.

    This webinar was originally broadcast on September 14th, 2021 10am PT / 11am MT /12pm CT / 1pm ET for one hour.

    Speakers

    • Dr. Rowlanda Cawthon, Dean and Associate Professor, Northwest University
    • Dr. Janice Doucet Thompson, Founder and Managing Principal, JD Thompson & Associates, LLC, Adjunct Faculty at the University of San Diego and the University of California, Davis
    • Dr. Cawthon served the Washington State Department of Corrections for over 11 years before transitioning to higher education. Her corrections experience includes serving as a classification counselor, community corrections officer, communications consultant, and correctional unit supervisor. Rowlanda is a passionate and innovative leader who capitalized on her leadership experience in corrections and doctoral education to drive change in her workplace. In her role as dean, she is leading a Ready to Work initiative that promises to unleash the leadership potential of undergraduate and graduate students in the workplace.
    • Dr. Thompson has achieved results for people and organizations for more than 30 years. A highly experienced and skilled executive leadership coach, Janice leads her Sacramento-based organizational development consultancy with a focus on leadership coaching, succession planning and talent management, change management and leadership development.
    • Janice is certified as a Marshall Goldsmith stakeholder-centered coach, a fellow at the Institute of Coaching, McClean (Affiliate of Harvard Medical School), and channel partner with the Ken Blanchard Companies.
    • Rowlanda and Janice earned their doctoral degrees together, co-instructed an international consulting experience for MBA students in Prague, Czech Republic, and are equally committed to developing transformational leaders in all professional sectors.
    Streaming Video
  • Objective Prison Classification: A Guide for Correctional Agencies

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    Objective Prison Classification: A Guide for Correctional Agencies

    Classification systems help minimize the potential for prison violence, escape, and institutional misconduct. During the past three decades, correctional system administrators and researchers worked assiduously to improve their approaches to classifying and housing incarcerated individuals according to their custody, work, and programming needs. These efforts have refined and validated the criteria for custody decisions, increased the reliability of custody decisions, reduced over-classification, enhanced assessment of institutional program needs, and reduced institutional violence.

    This publication is an update to NIC's previous Objective Prison Classification (2004). The second edition includes updates to critical areas, including the classification of women in prison and evaluating current classification systems. Following a brief discussion defining the essential components of an effective classification system, the guide walks through the four phases of effective classification system development: mobilization, assessment, planning, and implementation. The guide concludes with a discussion of special topics and implications for the future.

     

    Document
  • Model Practices for Parents in Prisons and Jails: Building Partnerships and Innovative Practices

    Model Practices for Parents in Prisons and Jails: Building Partnerships and Innovative Practices

    The National Institute of Corrections in collaboration with the Bureau of Justice Assistance presented “Building Partnerships & Innovative Practices” as part of an ongoing webinar series from the Family Connections Project. The presenters of the webinar discuss their unique partnerships centered on keeping children connected to their incarcerated parents. The webinar stems from the Model Practices for Parents in Prisons and Jails document.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Learn about promising practices pertaining to keeping children connected with their incarcerated parents.
    • Gain an understanding of approaches to partnerships correctional administrators and community leaders have taken to successfully implement these practices.
    • Learn of the different types of partnerships that can be formed and the importance of these partnerships.

    Originally broadcast: August 23rd, 2021 8am PST / 9am MST /10am CST /11am EST
     

    Speakers

    • Hilary Cuthrell, (PhD) Correctional Program Specialist, National Institute of Corrections
    • Trina Sexton, Warden York Correctional Institution, Connecticut Department of Correction
    • Nancy Correa, (DrPH), Practice Administrator: Public Health Pediatrics, Texas Children’s Hospital
    • Pajarita Charles (PhD), Assistant Professor, Sandra Rosenbaum School of Social Work, University of Wisconsin-Madison
    Streaming Video
  • Learning to Value Your Employees

    Learning to Value Your Employees

    As a leader, when was the last time you seriously thought about the kind of influence you want to have on your people? With a new generation of employees entering the criminal justice field, leaders need to examine how effectively they influence and develop others. Employees today want to be engaged; expect to grow their knowledge, skills, and abilities; and work for a purpose.

    To be effective, leaders must shift from the practice of simply managing to get work done to leading from a people-centered perspective. This webinar identifies how you can inspire people to achieve unexpected or remarkable results, both individually and as a team. You will learn about the four pillars of transformational leadership and how you can redefine the nature of leadership in the field of corrections.

    Takeaways:

    • Leaders are deeply respected and serve as powerful role models with high moral and ethical integrity.
    • Leaders are mentors, coaches, or guides who listen and address each employee’s concerns and needs as best as possible.
    • Leaders inspire and motivate employees to perform beyond expectations.
    • Leaders support a growth mindset and stimulate employees’ creativity and innovation.

    This webinar was originally broadcast on August 18, 2021 10 am PT / 11 am MT /12 pm CT / 1 pm ET for one hour.

    Speakers

    Dr. Rowlanda Cawthon, Dean and Associate Professor, Northwest University
    Dr. Janice Doucet Thompson, Founder and Managing Principal, JD Thompson & Associates, LLC, Adjunct Faculty at the University of San Diego and the University of California, Davis

    Dr. Cawthon served the Washington State Department of Corrections for over 11 years before transitioning to higher education. Her corrections experience includes serving as a classification counselor, community corrections officer, communications consultant, and correctional unit supervisor. Rowlanda is a passionate and innovative leader who capitalized on her leadership experience in corrections and doctoral education to drive change in her workplace. In her role as dean, she is leading a Ready to Work initiative that promises to unleash the leadership potential of undergraduate and graduate students in the workplace.

    Dr. Thompson has achieved results for people and organizations for more than 30 years. A highly experienced and skilled executive leadership coach, Janice leads her Sacramento-based organizational development consultancy with a focus on leadership coaching, succession planning and talent management, change management, and leadership development.

    Janice is certified as a Marshall Goldsmith stakeholder-centered coach; a fellow at the Institute of Coaching, McClean (Affiliate of Harvard Medical School); and channel partner with the Ken Blanchard Companies.

    Rowlanda and Janice earned their doctoral degrees together, co-instructed an international consulting experience for MBA students in Prague, Czech Republic, and are equally committed to developing transformational leaders in all professional sectors.

    Streaming Video
  • Learning to Lead from the Inside Out

    Learning to Lead from the Inside Out

    So, you are a leader now? Here comes the hard part, working on you! Every leader who seeks to transform people and organizations must look inward. What sets transformational leaders apart from the rest is a desire to continuously understand and improve themselves. Your willingness to work on yourself with all your good parts and flaws will be the pivotal turning point that determines what kind of leader you will be. Correctional settings need leaders who have the capacity to drive creativity and innovate change. In this interactive webinar, we discuss how to lead from within by exploring the power of personal awareness, personal mastery, and personal integrity. These essential traits will lay the foundation for you to effectively transform yourself, creating the pathway for you to influence others and transform the correctional agency you serve.

    Takeaways

    • Personal awareness is understanding yourself.
    • Personal integrity inspires you to become who others want to follow.
    • Personal mastery is the discipline of personal growth and learning.

    This webinar was orginally broadcast on July 21, 2021 / 10 am PT / 11 am MT /12 pm CT / 1 pm ET for one hour.

    Speakers

    Dr. Rowlanda Cawthon, Dean and Associate Professor, Northwest University
    Dr. Janice Doucet Thompson, Founder and Managing Principal, JD Thompson & Associates, LLC, Adjunct Faculty at the University of San Diego and the University of California, Davis

    Dr. Cawthon served the Washington State Department of Corrections for over 11 years before transitioning to higher education. Her corrections experience includes serving as a classification counselor, community corrections officer, communications consultant, and correctional unit supervisor. Rowlanda is a passionate and innovative leader who capitalized on her leadership experience in corrections and doctoral education to drive change in her workplace. In her role as dean, she is leading a Ready to Work initiative that promises to unleash the leadership potential of undergraduate and graduate students in the workplace.

    Dr. Thompson has achieved results for people and organizations for more than 30 years. A highly experienced and skilled executive leadership coach, Janice leads her Sacramento-based organizational development consultancy with a focus on leadership coaching, succession planning and talent management, change management, and leadership development.

    Janice is certified as a Marshall Goldsmith stakeholder-centered coach; a fellow at the Institute of Coaching, McClean (Affiliate of Harvard Medical School); and channel partner with the Ken Blanchard Companies.

    Rowlanda and Janice earned their doctoral degrees together, co-instructed an international consulting experience for MBA students in Prague, Czech Republic, and are equally committed to developing transformational leaders in all professional sectors.

    Streaming Video
  • Transgender Persons In Custody: The Legal Landscape

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    Transgender Persons In Custody: The Legal Landscape

    Do you and your agency have questions about the management of transgender persons in custody?

    In response to this emerging correctional issue, the National Institute of Corrections conducted a live internet broadcast designed to: provide information to agency legal counsel and corrections professionals regarding transgender persons in custody and their presumptive legal rights; demystify the issues surrounding policy and procedures decisions affecting this population; and identify emerging challenges and opportunities to provide strategies for ensuring equity while maintaining safety and security.

    During this internet broadcast, held March 29, 2017, the presenters:

    • Address agencies questions regarding issues, barriers, challenges and practices that affect transgender persons in custody;
    • Illustrate areas of greatest liability for agencies regarding transgender persons in custody; Determine areas to address in agency policy and procedure;
    • Explain steps agencies should take to ensure the safety and security of this population while in custody;
    • and Presenters will also share recommendations and resources.

    This broadcast will answer the following questions:

    • What is the current state of litigation regarding transgender persons in custody?
    • What legal rights do transgender persons in custody have?
    • What are the best and promising practices for safe and secure housing of transgender persons?
    • How can my agency provide reasonable accommodations for transgender persons in our custody?

    Please note that this broadcast was recorded in 2017 and the field has continued to move forward since the recording. Some states have had new court decisions impacting transgender persons, NIC recommends additional research to make sure you have the latest information.

    Video
  • The Foundation of Practical Application of Risk, Need, and Responsivity in the Age of COVID-19 and Justice Reform

    The Foundation of Practical Application of Risk, Need, and Responsivity in the Age of COVID-19 and Justice Reform

    Risk and need (RNR) assessments have been administered in the criminal justice system for decades but often have not influenced professional decision-making in intended ways. Although these assessments should improve outcomes by matching individuals to indicated services, information derived from these tools has often been ignored or has been connected to increased incarceration rates and unfair racial and ethnic disparities. For example, people classified as high risk may be more likely to be detained pretrial or to receive a jail or prison sentence, when almost no tools have been developed or validated for this purpose. Most commonly used tools were created to set community-based conditions of treatment and supervision in lieu of detention. Especially in the light of the COVID-19 pandemic and discussions around criminal justice reform, practitioners and policy makers must understand what RNR is and how it should be applied correctly to enhance both public health and public safety. This webinar seeks to define the core principles and practical application of Risk-Need-Responsivity along with strategies to create and maintain critical collaborative relationships to achieve reentry goals.

    Learning Objectives: During this 90-minute webinar, participants will:

    • Understand how common fallacies and misunderstandings about RNR principles have contributed to unnecessary reliance on incarceration and links to racial and ethnic disparities
    • Learn how proper use of RNR can reduce disparities, enhance criminal justice outcomes, and contribute to effective and equitable justice reform
    • Experience a practical application of the principles in a case study of reintegrating individuals within Multnomah County, Oregon
    • Learn strategies to create and maintain collaborative relationships to achieve your jurisdiction’s reentry goals

    This webinar was originally broadcast  July 21, 2021/ 11am PT / 12pm MT /1pm CT / 2pm ET for 90 minutes.

    Speakers
    Douglas B. Marlowe, J.D., Ph.D., is a senior scientific consultant for the National Association of Drug Court Professionals (NADCP) and senior science and policy advisor for Alcohol Monitoring Systems. Previously, he was the chief of science, law and policy for NADCP, the director of law and ethics research at the Treatment Research Institute, and an adjunct associate professor of psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Dr. Marlowe has published over 175 journal articles, monographs, books, and book chapters on the topics of correctional rehabilitation, forensic psychology, and treatment of substance use disorders.

    Erika Preuitt is the director of Multnomah County Department of Community Justice in Oregon, which provides adult and juvenile probation, pretrial release detention and parole and juvenile services. Ms. Preuitt has over twenty years of experience with the Department of Community Justice. Her core value is that people can change, and she is committed to evidence-based practices and community engagement and partnership. Ms. Preuitt is also the immediate past-president of the American Probation and Parole Association. She has served in several leadership roles in APPA.

    Mack Jenkins’s career in the criminal justice system spanned four decades. Chief Jenkins retired as the chief probation officer for San Diego County, where he oversaw a department of more than 1,300 staff who provided supervision and services to more than 13,000 adults and 2,500 juveniles under supervision. During his career, Jenkins has developed expertise in the use of evidenced-based practices for community supervision, implemented special supervision programs for people with domestic violence and sex crime convictions, and managed reentry programs for justice-involved juveniles. He has more than 20 years of experience working in drug courts and collaborative justice programs. While chief in San Diego, he chaired both the San Diego County Community Corrections Partnership and the Juvenile justice Coordinating Council.

     

    Streaming Video
  • Measuring What Matters: Outcome and Performance Measures for the Pretrial Services Field

    cover image for publication
    Measuring What Matters: Outcome and Performance Measures for the Pretrial Services Field

    The first edition of this publication was released in 2011. As pretrial services have redefined its goals and strategic objectives, so must its outcome and performance metrics change. To that end—and to ensure that metrics for the field continue to be developed by practitioners—NIC commissioned PEN to assess the current pretrial landscape and revise current metrics to match these new dynamics. This process included internal discussion by PEN members and input via a survey from pretrial services agency directors whose agencies collect performance metrics. PEN member discussions and the survey focused on which measures “work” in the real world, which were problematic, and what other data should be considered to gauge agency outcomes. The metrics presented here reflect this feedback. Outcomes are now tied to the three principles of bail—maximizing release, court appearance, and public safety—and a more refined definition of system “success” in meeting these objectives. Included commentary discusses how changes in the pretrial landscape over the past decade have helped redefine outcome and performance metrics.

    Document
  • Solving the Dilemma of Self-Injurious Behavior in the Incarcerated Population

    Solving the Dilemma of Self-Injurious Behavior in the Incarcerated Population Image
    Solving the Dilemma of Self-Injurious Behavior in the Incarcerated Population

    Do you want to develop a better understanding of the self-injurious behavior found among adults under your care and custody in a correctional setting? Would you like to improve your knowledge of the causes of their behavior and the most appropriate responses? 

    Self-injury continues to significantly affect correctional systems around the world, leading to adverse outcomes for the incarcerated people who participate in this behavior and the staff charged with their supervision and care.  To address this issue, correctional staff need a better understanding of self-injurious behaviors and the potential toll that witnessing these actions can take on correctional officers and other key staff.

    This interactive one-hour webinar delivers a practical, professional framework that can help staff protect themselves while also providing superior institutional responses to the self-injurious behavior found among the men and women in their custody. We will emphasize the nuances of self-injury in the correctional setting and the need for partnerships between multi-disciplinary teams to maximize outcomes.

    Learning Objectives:

    • During this one-hour interactive webinar, participants will:
    • Develop an understanding of the underlying motivations, prevalence, and manifestation of self-injurious behavior among incarcerated adults,
    • Identify the potential risks associated with witnessing self-injurious behavior and how that could affect correctional staff wellness and resiliency, and
    • Gain knowledge about the most appropriate institutional responses to self-injury among the incarcerated population.

    Speaker

    Dr. Hayden Smith is a professor of criminology and criminal justice at the University of South Carolina.  His principal focus of study is the intersection of the criminal justice and public health systems. Dr. Smith is a national and international expert on self-injurious and suicidal behaviors occurring in incarcerated populations. Other areas of study include officer wellness and resiliency, the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA), reentry initiatives, and best practices in evaluating corrections-based programs. Dr. Smith has published extensively on self-harm among the incarcerated population and has numerous experiences working with diverse correctional agencies.

    Originally broadcast on May 27, 2021

    Streaming Video
  • That’s DOPE – Making Every Voice Count!, Part 4

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    That’s DOPE – Making Every Voice Count!, Part 4

    We know how you say it matters, and now, in today’s multicultural world, why we said it is equally important. Our experiences and values lead us to unique perspectives about our behavior. A correctional organization’s ability to leverage all voices is much like a music producer. Each unique perspective has its own melody, scale, and intensity that, when combined, can lead to making an impactful DOPE sound.

    In the workplace, it’s the team’s collective finely tuned voice that, when in sync, will have the most considerable impact on success. Implementing the techniques that we will share with you will help you get to the D.O.P.E. sound/impact you are striving for. We will walk you through the steps of creating an environment, which allows your team to learn how to listen and be heard together. You will leave as producers with the latest tools to aid in encouraging the engagement and contributions indicative of a high-performing team.

    Take-Aways :
    Techniques to create a (D.O.P.E) unified voice through:

    D iverse and Inclusive: Representative at all levels of the organization
    O pen and Fair: Transparent and equal access to opportunities
    P sychologically Safe Place: A space where people can feel free to be themselves
    E quitable: Access to shape and develop

    Speakers

    • Alfranda Durr, CEO ALD & Associates LLC
    • Kari Heistad, CEO Cultural Coach International

    Alfranda (Al) and Kari are Diversity and Inclusion Practitioners with 40 plus years of combined experience conducting in-person and virtual training on a wide range of Human Resources, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion topics. Al and Kari have partnered on a popular webinar series covering a wide range of diversity topics. Combined, Al and Kari bring varied perspectives and ways of seeing the world to their presentations.

    Originally broadcast May 12, 2021

    Streaming Video
  • A Leader’s Role in Promoting Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Culture, Part 3

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    A Leader’s Role in Promoting Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Culture, Part 3

    The landscape of the work environment has been irreversibly changed. Stepping into a leadership role continues to be a great privilege, but today it also comes with the even greater responsibility of creating a workplace culture that values all individuals. We designed this presentation to help you build on the fundamentals that will allow you to L.E.A.D. the charge in promoting diversity, equity, and inclusion (DE&I). Allow us to provide you four foundational actions that will distinguish you as a forward-thinking influencer who can communicate and demonstrate DE&I practices. This webinar gives you the tools to confidently move your team in the right direction to achieve exceptional performance in the corrections workplace.

    This one-hour webinar:

    1. Explores ways to dive deep into your “why” as an influencer on the correctional organization’s culture and workforce performance through purposeful interactions with clients, community partners, and stakeholders.
    2. Provides insights on how to utilize emotional intelligence principles to better understand colleagues, team members, and the correctional organization’s clients/stakeholders.
    3. Participates in interactive skill-building exercises to put that “why” into action to achieve personal and professional goals.

    Originally broadcast on April 20 , 2021.
    This is part three in a four part series.

    Take-Aways:

    Pathway to L.E.A.D. a DE&I Culture

    Listen: Gain a perspective or understating of the issues and opportunities people are facing
    Engage: Develop and implement strategies to drive change that is relevant and meaningful
    Assess: Sources of inclusion at the Organization, Leadership, and Individual level
    Direct and facilitate change: Based on your assessments, implement interventions and solutions to address opportunities to build and develop an inclusive culture


    Speakers

    • Alfranda Durr, CEO ALD & Associates LLC
    • Kari Heistad, CEO Cultural Coach International

    Alfranda (Al) and Kari are Diversity and Inclusion Practitioners with 40 plus years of combined experience conducting in-person and virtual training on a wide range of Human Resources, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion topics. Al and Kari have partnered on a popular diversity webinar series covering a wide range of diversity topics. Combined, Al and Kari bring varied perspectives to their presentations.

    Streaming Video
  • Indian Country Jail Administration

    Indian Country Jail Administration

    This 36-hour training program focuses on the basic skills and competencies jail administrators in Indian Country need to effectively meet their responsibilities. Eleven modules comprise this training: program overview and clarifying the role of the Jail Administrator; building support for the jail in the justice system and community; using jail standards as a basis for policy and operations; managing risk; developing and assessing policies and procedures; determining staffing needs; promoting optimal staff performance; managing jail resources; managing inmate behavior; assessing jail operations; and action plan development, reports, closeout, and evaluation.

    Document
  • BIA Detention Facility Staffing Analysis Workshop

    BIA Detention Facility Staffing Analysis Workshop

    In this workshop, you will: examine your role and purpose in conducting staffing analyses for detention facilities; learn the steps in conducting a jail staffing analysis based on the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) model; plan and conduct a mock staffing analysis; prepare and present a staffing analysis; and explore ways to optimize staff available staff resources. Six modules comprise this manual: workshop overview and agenda; clarifying roles and expectations; laying a foundation; conducting the staffing analysis—Part 1 and Part 2; and other staffing considerations.

    Document
  • BIA Adult Detention Facility Guidelines: Assessing, Achieving, and Sustaining Compliance: Lesson Plans and Slides [and] Participant Manual

    BIA Adult Detention Facility Guidelines: Assessing, Achieving, and Sustaining Compliance: Lesson Plans and Slides [and] Participant Manual

    Participants of this training program will: understand the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Detention Guidelines—content and purpose; learn steps to take to prepare for and conduct a facility audit; know how to determine compliance and to identify deficiencies; plan and conduct an audit; develop and present a compliance plan in a written report; and learn how to serve as a resource to help facilities achieve and sustain compliance. Modules cover: welcome, introductions, and program overview; detention guidelines overview; detention guidelines content review; preparing for the audit; conducting the audit; developing and presenting a corrective action plan; and monitoring and providing support in sustaining compliance.

    Document
  • What’s Your Eye Chart Saying? How Our Beliefs Filter Our Views, Part 1

    What’s Your Eye Chart Saying? How Our Beliefs Filter Our Views, Part 1

    When was the last time you had your eyes examined? Just as the health of our vision is maintained through regular eye exams, the way in which we see the world is maintained through self-awareness and broadening our perspectives. In the midst of quarantines, telework, and increased isolation from both friends and colleagues, we are also living through a time of social unrest. For many people, this time in history has brought new insights into the criminal justice system and interaction across cultures and life experiences.

    If you are interested in improving your cultural “eye sight,” this one-hour interactive webinar sponsored by the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) is for you! Our vision for how we view and perceive others is impacted by our individual beliefs, values, and past experiences. In this webinar, we’ll explore preconceptions and techniques that can be used to understand how other people see the world. By gaining insight into your own personal filters, you will be able to engage in difficult conversations and begin to develop a greater sense of awareness and empathy that starts with YOU.

    Originally broadcast on August 20, 2020.
    This is part one in a four part series.

    Take Aways:
    Prepare to learn how to develop your H.U.E.:
    H elp with cultural considerations toward effective communication in corrections;
    U nderstand how your preconceptions and values influence your vision;
    E nhance your ability to navigate shared experiences.


    Speakers:
    Alfranda Durr, CEO ALD & Associates LLC
    Kari Heistad, CEO Cultural Coach International

    Alfranda (Al) and Kari are Certified Diversity and Inclusion Practitioners with 40 plus years of combined experience conducting in-person and virtual training on a wide range of Human Resources, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion topics. Al and Kari have partnered on a popular diversity webinar series covering a wide range of diversity topics. Combined, Al and Kari bring diverse perspectives and ways of seeing the world to their presentations.

     

    Streaming Video
  • Building Inclusion Across Multi-Disciplinary Teams, Part 2

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    Building Inclusion Across Multi-Disciplinary Teams, Part 2

    Do you feel like you are working in an inclusive environment? Organizations of all kinds – including corrections – have wrestled with how to create an inclusive culture and promote inclusivity for decades. Now the stakes are even higher to develop and cultivate a culture that promotes excellence by leveraging everyone’s skills, abilities, knowledge, and workplace experiences. Focusing on your workforce’s diverse talents will promote a heightened awareness of each person’s contribution and produce higher performing teams.

    If you are interested in being part of a team where everyone can contribute and feel they are a valued member, this one-hour interactive webinar sponsored by the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) will benefit you. In this webinar, we explore the benefits of building inclusion across multi-disciplinary teams in corrections to increase cultural awareness, operational effectiveness, and program efficacy.

    Originally broadcast on March 31, 2021.
    This is part two in a four part series.

    Take-Aways :
    Prepare to learn Building Inclusion (I.C.E):
    I ncrease effective communication and collaboration between teams and working units;
    C odify processes and behaviors that promote innovative solutions to complex issues; and
    E xcel in the face of organizational change.


    Speakers:

    • Alfranda Durr, CEO ALD & Associates LLC
    • Kari Heistad, CEO Cultural Coach International

    Alfranda (Al) and Kari are Certified Diversity and Inclusion Practitioners with 40 plus years of combined experience conducting in-person and virtual training on a wide range of Human Resources, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion topics. Al and Kari have partnered on a popular diversity webinar series covering a wide range of diversity topics. Combined, Al and Kari bring varied perspectives and worldviews to their presentations.

    Streaming Video
  • National Institute of Corrections Report to the Nation FY 2019

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    National Institute of Corrections Report to the Nation FY 2019

    This report presents the activity of the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) over Fiscal Year 2019. Some of the achievements highlighted are numerous technological advances and modernization of NIC curricula.

    Document
  • Promoting Wellness and Resiliency in Correctional Staff

    wellness webinar
    Promoting Wellness and Resiliency in Correctional Staff

    Do you want to see what some of the latest data and promising practices are revealing about staff wellness for corrections officers and staff?  Would you like to learn how to apply a holistic approach to your workplace along the continuum of preventive to reactive responses?  Correctional staff face significant stress and challenges in maintaining wellness and resiliency in the workplace.  There is emerging evidence that effective strategies and programs exist; however, they often occur in a piecemeal or sporadic fashion.  This webinar provides academic insight into the current research on officer wellness and references emerging areas of innovative practices.  It includes practitioner expertise on valuable resources and support for correctional officers and staff.  The webinar moves from preventive to reactive strategies and builds on new approaches to increase resiliency.  Participants will learn what research and practice tell us about the short and long-term effects that working in corrections can have and how to promote staff wellness and manage trauma in response to what they experience.

    Learning Objectives: 

    During this one-hour interactive webinar, participants will

    1. Develop an understanding of the current research on correctional staff wellness and resiliency,
    2. Learn how to apply a holistic approach to their workplace, and
    3. Gain knowledge on promising real-world practices that can assist and promote both wellness and resiliency.

    Speakers

    Dr. Hayden Smith is an Associate Professor of Criminology & Criminal Justice at the University of South Carolina.  His principal focus of study is the intersection of the criminal justice and public health systems.  Core areas include self-injurious and suicidal behaviors in incarcerated populations, physical and mental health needs in correctional settings, jail diversion, reentry initiatives, and correctional staff well-being and safety.  Dr. Smith has expertise in program evaluation and policy analysis and has worked with numerous correctional and health systems.

    Ms. Karin Ho is the Director for Victim Services with the South Carolina Department of Corrections.  She has more than 30 years of victim advocacy experience and over 25 years in corrections.  Recognizing how correctional staff were affected by traumatic events, she implemented the Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM) Peer Team and Post Critical Incident Seminars for employees with ongoing trauma-related issues.  As part of the CISM Team, Karin is the handler for a specially trained trauma dog who responds to correctional staff throughout the state.

    The presenters have engaged in several academic-practitioner partnerships that address correctional officer and staff well-being.

    Streaming Video
  • Recommendations for Practice: Post-Conviction Victims' Rights and Services

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    Recommendations for Practice: Post-Conviction Victims' Rights and Services
    In 2017, the National Institute of Corrections and the National Crime Victim Law Institute began work on a project to analyze existing rights and services, identify gaps and opportunities for inter-agency collaboration, and draft a set of recommendations to assist jurisdictions in the development of systems to improve rights compliance and implementation of integrated trauma-informed services post conviction.
    Stakeholders participating in this project collaboratively envisioned a model of trauma-informed post-conviction systems, processes, laws, and policies that were responsive to the rights, needs, and recovery of victims while holding offenders accountable and promoting safe communities. As a result of this collaboration, a list of recommendations were developed that aim to move post-conviction services and systems toward consistently affording victims their rights—including the rights to be treated with fairness, dignity, and respect—and recognizing victims as integral actors in, and consumers of, meaningful and effective post-conviction systems. This paper is the product of project efforts.
    Document
  • BIA Adult Detention Facility Guidelines

    BIA Adult Detention Facility Guidelines

    This resource contains: The BIA Adult Detention Facility Guidelines are drawn from the national Performance-Based Core Jail Standards, developed by the American Correctional Association (ACA). BIA Corrections Handbook: contains policies, rules, and regulations that apply to all detention personnel. ADF audit form: A checklist for preforming an audit of a detention facility. ADF Guidelines which outline the standards.

    Document
  • 2019 Corrections Environmental Scan

    2019 Corrections Environmental Scan

    Now in its 14th edition, an updated online version of the Corrections Environment Scan is presented here. Renamed the Corrections Environmental Scan in 2017, it continues to evolve into a popular tool that corrections practitioners use to inform their work in jails, prisons, and community supervision.

    The report is arranged into five topics: Population Demographics, Economy, Workforce, Technology, and Statistics, with the special highlighted topic: Justice Involved Women. The Corrections Environmental Scan is intended to give a broad overview of the latest news and trends in these topics, from the corrections, domestic, and global perspectives.

    Web Page
  • How Do I Design / Add Engagement, Interaction and Collaboration Tools? Part 3

    How Do I Design / Add Engagement, Interaction and Collaboration Tools? Part 3

    This is a three part webinar series. Each webinar builds into the next!

    Are you converting your instructor led training (a.k.a. face-to-face or in-person training) to live virtual instructor led training (VILT)? Do you know where to start to convert face-to-face training and materials, such as your facilitator guides, participant guides, slide shows, and other learning experience materials?

    What We Will Do in the Webinar Series?

    1. Explore popular virtual platforms, compare and contrast them to your unique agency needs / outcomes for virtual learning.
    2. Assess agency technology infrastructure as well as learner, trainer, and agency readiness for virtual learning.
    3. Survey best practices to determine the duration of virtual learning based upon training outcomes.
    4. Apply options for participant engagement, interaction, and collaboration during virtual learning.
    5. Share experiences from other correctional agencies with respect to in-person to virtual conversions.

    If you are interested in the answers to these questions and more, then watch this webinar series!

    Part 3:

    In the third webinar of this series, participants use the ADDIE road map to guide steps needed to design in and add engagements, interactions, and collaboration tools into their virtual instructor led training (VILT) conversion process. The webinar includes defining engagements and interactions that lead to virtual collaboration, and highlights various examples of how to design and add these tools to virtual training design and facilitation. Included in the webinar is demonstration and practice of using a design flow tool for detailing engagements, interactions, and collaborations to meet a performance objective. Sample design flow is shared for a virtual performance objective from NIC's Correctional Leadership Development (CLD) virtual training series.

    Facilitators

    • Jeff Hadnot, Chief, NIC Academy Division
    • Ashley Kerr, Training Officer, Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction
    • Elizabeth Kreger, Assistant Director of Adult Options, Ohio Department of Education
    • Leslie LeMaster, Correctional Program Specialist, NIC Academy Division
    • Jim Wiseman, Director of Training (retired), Missouri Department of Corrections
    Streaming Video
  • What’s Next? How Do I Convert ILT to VILT? The Basics, Part 2

    What’s Next? How Do I Convert ILT to VILT? The Basics, Part 2

    This is a three part webinar series. Each webinar builds into the next!

    Are you converting your instructor led training (a.k.a. face-to-face or in-person training) to live virtual instructor led training (VILT)? Do you know where to start to convert face-to-face training and materials, such as your facilitator guides, participant guides, slide shows, and other learning experience materials?

    What We Will Do in the Webinar Series?

    1. Explore popular virtual platforms, compare and contrast them to your unique agency needs / outcomes for virtual learning.
    2. Assess agency technology infrastructure as well as learner, trainer, and agency readiness for virtual learning.
    3. Survey best practices to determine the duration of virtual learning based upon training outcomes.
    4. Apply options for participant engagement, interaction, and collaboration during virtual learning.
    5. Share experiences from other correctional agencies with respect to in-person to virtual conversions.

    If you are interested in the answers to these questions and more, then watch this webinar series!

    Part 2:

    In the second webinar of this series, participants use the ADDIE road map to guide steps needed to analyze, design, develop, implement and evaluate the instructor led training (ILT) to virtual instructor led training (VILT) conversion process. Best practices for converting from ILT to VILT are detailed including analyzing status of curriculum you are converting to virtual, is it a one to one hour ratio from in person to live virtual delivery hours, virtual digital live and off-live activities, and determining session duration and number of live virtual sessions. The webinar includes three agency conversion stories, focused on the steps to converting from in person to virtual training.

    Experiences are shared from

    1. Ohio Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation's (ODRC) New Employee Orientation (NEO) training,
    2. NIC's Correctional Leadership Development (CLD) training, and
    3. NIC's Thinking for a Change (T4C) Facilitator training.

    Facilitators

    • Jeff Hadnot, Chief, NIC Academy Division
    • Ashley Kerr, Training Officer, Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction
    • Elizabeth Kreger, Assistant Director of Adult Options, Ohio Department of Education
    • Leslie LeMaster, Correctional Program Specialist, NIC Academy Division
    • Jim Wiseman, Director of Training (retired), Missouri Department of Corrections
    Streaming Video
  • Where Do I Start? Using ADDIE as a Roadmap for Conversion, Part 1

    Where Do I Start? Using ADDIE as a Roadmap for Conversion, Part 1

    This is a three part webinar series. Each webinar builds into the next!

    Are you converting your instructor led training (a.k.a. face-to-face or in-person training) to live virtual instructor led training (VILT)? Do you know where to start to convert face-to-face training and materials, such as your facilitator guides, participant guides, slide shows, and other learning experience materials?

    What We Will Do in the Webinar Series?

    1. Explore popular virtual platforms, compare and contrast them to your unique agency needs / outcomes for virtual learning.
    2. Assess agency technology infrastructure as well as learner, trainer, and agency readiness for virtual learning.
    3. Survey best practices to determine the duration of virtual learning based upon training outcomes.
    4. Apply options for participant engagement, interaction, and collaboration during virtual learning.
    5. Share experiences from other correctional agencies with respect to in-person to virtual conversions.

    Part 1:
    In this webinar, participants used the ADDIE framework (Assessment, Design, Development, Implementation and Evaluation) as a virtual roadmap to:

    • Compare and contrast the characteristics of popular virtual training platforms;
    • Assess agency technology infrastructure versus what is needed for effective live virtual training delivery;
    • Assess learner, trainer, and agency readiness for virtual learning; and
    • Determine initial steps for conversion of training from in person (instructor led training / ILT) to virtual instructor led (VILT).

     

    Facilitators

    • Jeff Hadnot, Chief, NIC Academy Division
    • Ashley Kerr, Training Officer, Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction
    • Elizabeth Kreger, Assistant Director of Adult Options, Ohio Department of Education
    • Leslie LeMaster, Correctional Program Specialist, NIC Academy Division
    • Jim Wiseman, Director of Training (retired), Missouri Department of Corrections
    Streaming Video

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