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  • Criminal Stigma, Race, Gender, and Employment: An Expanded Assessment of the Consequences of Imprisonment for Employment

    Criminal Stigma, Race, Gender, and Employment: An Expanded Assessment of the Consequences of Imprisonment for Employment Cover
    Criminal Stigma, Race, Gender, and Employment: An Expanded Assessment of the Consequences of Imprisonment for Employment

    This report provides a very good look at how criminal records, race, and gender impact chances for employment. Sections following an executive summary cover: prisoner reentry and employment; race and the criminal justice system; stereotyping racial minorities and the unemployed; crime and employment; finding work in an era of mass incarceration; women, criminal records, and finding employment after prison; focus and research methods using an on-line job application, in-person application, and an employer survey; results according to females, male, and employers; and critical policy considerations regarding the role of the internet in applying for a job, the job interview, job training, and preparation for work, and expanding social capital for former inmates. "Consistent with prior research, we find differences by race/ethnicity, with blacks and Hispanics generally faring more poorly than whites. The differences for the online application process were not as large as for the in person process, but, nonetheless, we did find that a prison record has a dampening effect on job prospects, particularly in the low-skill food service sector, where ex-prisoners are likely to seek employment during reentry. The employer survey revealed strong effects for criminal justice involvement, with employers expressing preferences for hiring individuals with no prior criminal justice contact" (p. 1-2).

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  • Young Women of Color with Criminal Records: A Barrier to Economic Stability for Low-Income Families and Communities

    Young Women of Color with Criminal Records: A Barrier to Economic Stability for Low-Income Families and Communities Cover
    Young Women of Color with Criminal Records: A Barrier to Economic Stability for Low-Income Families and Communities

    “Over the past few years, young women of color have been represented at a disproportionately high rate among clients coming to Community Legal Services (CLS) for help with barriers to employment caused by criminal records. This is particularly notable, as the vast majority of research, programming, and policy attention regarding criminal records and barriers to employment have focused on men. The impact of criminal records on young women seeking employment has largely been overlooked” (p. 2). This publication presents data showing the degree to which minority women are impacted by their past criminal records. Sections cover: issue overview; observations from CLS’s experiences with young female clients; local and national trends in arrest data, by gender; characteristics of women with criminal records; impact on employment; and five policy recommendations to address long-term joblessness of female offenders.

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  • OJJDP MPG Literature Review: LGBTQ Youths in the Juvenile Justice System

    LGBTQ Youths in the Juvenile Justice System Cover
    OJJDP MPG Literature Review: LGBTQ Youths in the Juvenile Justice System

    Youths’ sexual orientations and gender identities are complex. Youths experience an ongoing process of sexual development as they mature into young adults. Adolescence presents a time in people’s lives when they are unsure of themselves and begin to question who they are … Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) youths may present unique challenges in the juvenile justice system. Research has shown that LGBTQ youths are more likely to confront certain barriers and environmental risk factors connected to their sexual orientations and gender identities (p. 1). This literature review is an excellent introduction to issues surrounding LGBTQ juvenile offenders. Sections of this document include: definitions; the number of LGBTQ youth in the juvenile justice system; risk and protective factors; LGBTQ youth in the juvenile justice system; outcome evidence; recommendations to reform policies and practices; and conclusion.

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  • Breaking Down Mass Incarceration in the 2010 Census: State-by-State Incarceration Rates by Race/Ethnicity

    Breaking Down Mass Incarceration in the 2010 Census: State-by-State Incarceration Rates by Race/Ethnicity Cover
    Breaking Down Mass Incarceration in the 2010 Census: State-by-State Incarceration Rates by Race/Ethnicity

    "Social science research has time and again come to the robust conclusion that exposure to the criminal justice system has profound and intergenerational negative effects on communities that experience disproportionate incarceration rates. It is imperative that we are able to measure the extent to which the criminal justice system disparately impacts our communities." You can find this information easily by referring to this briefing. It does an excellent job in synthesizing the information that is known about the disproportion of incarcerated minorities in the United States at the state level. In addition to incarceration rates by race/ethnicity, the following statistics (if available) are provided for each state and the U.S. federal prison system for the period 1978-2012: the degree to which Whites are underrepresented in the particular state's prisons and jails; Hispanics are overrepresented; Blacks are overrepresented; American Indians are overrepresented; Native Hawaiians are overrepresented.

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  • Beyond Risk and Needs Assessments

    Beyond Risk and Needs Assessments Cover
    Beyond Risk and Needs Assessments

    “Most assessment systems target high-risk offenders. However, standard risk and needs assessments do not necessarily identify needs that are truly criminogenic for each individual; nor do they address responsivity. This is because these systems do not inherently identify either specific strategies and programs that reflect the learning style of the offender or approaches and programs most likely to motivate each offender to change behavior. This paper describes a comprehensive approach to assessment, developed by the National Council on Crime and Delinquency (NCCD), that successfully addresses all three objectives listed above. This methodology was originally embedded in the Client Management Classification (CMC) system and Strategies for Juvenile Supervision (SJS) assessment and supervision systems. It currently is embedded in the Correctional Assessment and Intervention System (CAIS) and Juvenile Assessment and Intervention System (JAIS) … Evaluation outcomes from six separate studies have shown that this methodology significantly reduces recidivism for both probationers and parolees and reduces institutional infractions when used in institutional settings. Results from these studies, which were conducted by different research teams in different jurisdictions across a 25-year timeframe, are summarized in this paper.” Sections included in this report are: introduction; what separates CAIS and JAIS from other assessment models; how CMC and SJS were developed; evaluations of CMC; the Texas Study, 1987; the Wisconsin Study, 1986; Council of State Governments, 2011; the emergence of CAIS and JAIS; supervision strategies; enhancing responsivity through case planning; and conclusion.

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  • Facilitating Health Care Coverage for Juvenile Justice-Involved Youth

    Facilitating Health Care Coverage for Juvenile Justice-Involved Youth Cover
    Facilitating Health Care Coverage for Juvenile Justice-Involved Youth

    “As states and juvenile justice stakeholders work to facilitate health coverage and access for system-involved youth, they can draw upon the experiences of their counterparts across the country to improve eligibility, enrollment, and outreach processes. Medicaid eligibility strategies in several states have already facilitated seamless coverage for juvenile justice-involved youth, and consumer assistance programs created by the Affordable Care Act (ACA) will provide additional resources to support continuity of care. Collaboration among Medicaid and juvenile justice systems and stakeholders will be essential to fully realizing the opportunities presented by health care reform.” Sections of this brief cover: the issue of Medicaid coverage for justice-involved youth; innovations—Medicaid eligibility options (suspending eligibility, continuous eligibility, and presumptive eligibility), expedited Medicaid enrollment, and outreach; lessons learned; and looking forward.

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  • Arrested Development: Confinement Can Negatively Affect Youth Maturation

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    Arrested Development: Confinement Can Negatively Affect Youth Maturation

    Anyone working with juvenile offenders should read this. It reviews a recent study regarding the impact of incarceration on the development of a juvenile’s psychosocial maturity--the combined abilities of impulse control (temperance), perspective (especially seeing from different points of view), and responsibility. Sections of this brief cover: general information about this study; research findings showing that incarceration of juveniles provides “no bang for our buck”—that placing youth in secure facilities slows their maturation, negative institutional settings harms youth’s maturation, and why short term slowing of maturation should be important to us; and policy implications. “The study finds statistically significant, short-term declines in psychosocial maturity for youth incarcerated in a secure facility. This period of lower maturity level means that youth may be more impulsive and susceptible to negative peer influence upon release, placing them at higher risk for re-arrest” (p. 1).

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  • Core Principles for Reducing Recidivism and Improving Other Outcomes for Youth in the Juvenile Justice System

    Core Principles for Reducing Recidivism and Improving Other Outcomes for Youth in the Juvenile Justice System Cover
    Core Principles for Reducing Recidivism and Improving Other Outcomes for Youth in the Juvenile Justice System

    "The best way to help prevent a youth’s subsequent contact with the juvenile justice system is to prevent him or her from being involved with the system in the first place. The field has been engaged in significant efforts to divert status offenders and other low-risk youth from ever coming into contact with the system. The focus of this white paper is on what works to promote successful reentry for those youth who are under the supervision of a juvenile justice system, which encompasses a process that begins the moment any youth comes into contact with the system, no matter how brief or at what level, to support their successful transition from supervision to a crime-free and productive adulthood" (p. 3). This white paper is divided into two parts. Part One—Policies and Practices That Reduce Recidivism and Improve Other Youth Outcomes: Principle 1--base supervision, service, and resource-allocation decisions on the results of validated risk and needs assessments; Principle 2--adopt and effectively implement programs and services demonstrated to reduce recidivism and improve other youth outcomes, and use data to evaluate system performance and direct system improvements; Principle 3--employ a coordinated approach across service systems to address youth’s needs; and Principle 4--tailor system policies, programs, and supervision to reflect the distinct developmental needs of adolescents. Part Two—Key Implementation Strategies, Structures, and Supports: Principle 1--base supervision, service, and resource-allocation decisions on the results of validated risk and needs assessments; Principle 2-- adopt and effectively implement programs and services demonstrated to reduce recidivism and improve other youth outcomes, and use data to evaluate system performance and direct system improvements; Principle 3--employ a coordinated approach across service systems to address youth’s needs; and Principle 4--tailor system policies, programs, and supervision to reflect the distinct developmental needs of adolescents.

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  • Civil Liability for the Use of Pepper Spray (OC), Tear Gas, and Chemical Agents, Part 1 [and] Part 2

    Civil Liability for the Use of Pepper Spray (OC), Tear Gas, and Chemical Agents, Part 1 [and] Part 2 Cover
    Civil Liability for the Use of Pepper Spray (OC), Tear Gas, and Chemical Agents, Part 1 [and] Part 2

    This article is an excellent resource for those who want a basic understanding of those civil issues impacting the use of pepper spray and other chemical agents by law enforcement and correctional officers. "Pepper Spray (OC) and other chemical weapons are intended and designed to be used as disabling agents, for law enforcement officers and correctional personnel to use to attempt to overcome resistance, and to subdue persons with minimal injuries to officers, arrestees and others. Chemical weapons can be used in situations in which a disturbance involves a number of people, but they also are effective against an actively resisting individual. This is not a technical article, and it does not survey the wide variety of specific chemical weapons available to law enforcement and correctional personnel, or to assess their pros and cons. Rather, the focus is to briefly look at how courts have discussed their use in the context of civil lawsuits for excessive force" (Part 1, p. 101). Sections of this article include: introduction; use by law enforcement, use on handcuffed persons; warnings; crowds and bystanders; the aftermath of their use; New Orleans Consent Decree; correctional settings; and suggestions to consider.

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  • Cost-Benefit Analysis: A Guide for Drug Courts and Other Criminal Justice Programs

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    Cost-Benefit Analysis: A Guide for Drug Courts and Other Criminal Justice Programs

    "As resource constraints have tightened, the role of researchers in informing evidence-based and cost-effective decisions about the use of funds, labor, materials and equipment — and even the skills of workers — has increased. We [the authors] believe research that can inform decisions about resource allocation will be a central focus of criminal justice research in the years to come, with cost-benefit analysis (CBA) among the key tools" (p. 3). This is required reading for those individuals tasked with determining what the social impact of a criminal justice program will be (whether a benefit or not). It must be stressed that a CBA estimates social benefits not fiscal savings. This report is comprised of three sections: the basics of cost-benefit analysis—what and why, considerations in valuing time, what CBA can and can't do, and the four steps of a CBA; cost-benefit analysis in action—NIJ's Multi-site Adult Drug Court Evaluation (MADCE); and results from the MADCE cost-benefit analysis.

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  • Civil Liability for the Use of Neck Restraints

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    Civil Liability for the Use of Neck Restraints

    Neck restraints are a valuable but sometimes still controversial procedure for the use of force by police officers and correctional personnel … It is a procedure that is useful when police or correctional officers are in close proximity with suspects or prisoners. While it can be very effective, it requires motor skills training, and attempts at such holds without proper training can turn an improperly applied hold into an air choke. This is especially the case when a subject attempts to resist the hold, such as by attempting to turn around, inadvertently putting pressure on their airway when none was intended … Improperly applied neck restraints that turn into choke holds and restrict the intake of breath can and have in some instances resulted in tragic consequences including death or permanent disability” (p. 101-102). This two-part article looks at the liability issues related to neck restraint use. It is comprised of the following sections: introduction; the U.S. Supreme Court ruling regarding “City of Los Angeles v. Lyons” and aftermath; subsequent law enforcement cases; neck restraints in correctional settings; the 2007 study by the Canadian Police Research Centre; and suggestions to consider.

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  • Inventory of Evidence-Based and Research-Based Programs for Adult Corrections

    Inventory of Evidence-Based and Research-Based Programs for Adult Corrections Cover
    Inventory of Evidence-Based and Research-Based Programs for Adult Corrections

    Evidence-based and research-based programs to be used by adult corrections in Washington State are inventoried. Three parts comprise this report: definitions—evidence-based, research-based, and cost-beneficial; updated reviews using a three-step research process (evidence, benefits and costs, and risk), effective practices in community corrections, sex offender treatment, and conclusion; and the inventory. “WSIPP identified two programs—sex offender treatment and EPICS—that were not previously included in WSIPP’s evidence- and research-based results. Our updated findings on the two topics in this report allowed us to incorporate the results in the adult corrections inventory. The weight of the evidence indicates that sex offender treatment, delivered in confinement or in the community, is evidence-based and generates benefits that exceed costs. Our findings on EPICS [Effective Practices in Community Supervision], however, are not as clear cut. While we find supervision based on RNR principles is effective, the evidence on the particular approach—EPICS—is still undetermined until further research becomes available” (p. 5-6).

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  • Oregon Prison Tackles Solitary Confinement with Blue Room Experiment

    Oregon Prison Tackles Solitary Confinement with Blue Room Experiment Cover
    Oregon Prison Tackles Solitary Confinement with Blue Room Experiment

    Your agency might consider this amazingly innovative strategy or a similar one for addressing mental health in your supermax or administrative segregation units. "Prison officials across the United States have spent the last few years debating how to help tens of thousands of prisoners cope in solitary confinement, the housing of last resort for violent, combative, or escape-prone inmates. Many human rights groups condemn the highly restrictive cells as an incubator for mental illness. About 19 months ago, Snake River officials turned for help from an offbeat source, a globetrotting forest ecologist more familiar with the canopies of Costa Rica's rainforests than the internal struggles of prisoners kept month after month in isolated quarters. What emerged was a one-of-a-kind sanctuary known as the Blue Room. Inside a converted recreation room, prisoners deprived of wind and sunsets and trees can reconnect with sights and sounds of the natural world. A video projector casts images against a wall: Big Sur, a brook in a dark forest, a tropical beach and 30 other nature videos. The plan to calm prisoners and make them less violent shows promise." This article explains how a 5-minute TED (Technology, Education, Design) talk by Nalini Nadkarni resulted in the development and implementation of the Blue Room which is located in the IMU (Intensive Management Unit) – a 20 tier contained section of the Snake River Correctional Institution. The costs for this program run about $1,500. While the data is preliminary, the rate of disciplinary infractions is higher for those inmates who did not use the Blue Room compared to the rate for those inmates who did.

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  • Case Study: New York City Department of Probation’s Federal Partnership Efforts: Profile of a Successful Technical Assistance Collaboration With the Bureau of Justice Assistance and the National Institute of Corrections

    Case Study: New York City Department of Probation’s Federal Partnership Efforts: Profile of a Successful Technical Assistance Collaboration With the Bureau of Justice Assistance and the National Institute of Corrections Cover
    Case Study: New York City Department of Probation’s Federal Partnership Efforts: Profile of a Successful Technical Assistance Collaboration With the Bureau of Justice Assistance and the National Institute of Corrections

    "The New York City Department of Probation (DOP)—the second largest probation department in the country—is advancing a process to infuse evidence-based policies and practices (EBPP) throughout the organization … What is significant for the purpose of this story is that the Federal agencies were able to thoughtfully, strategically, respectfully, and effectively apply the right dosage of technical assistance to the moving train in a way that made the most of the investment and the capacity that BJA and NIC had to marshal for the city" (p. 3-4). This brief explains how the NYC DOP Adult Operations Division partnered with the U.S. Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) and the National Institute of Correction (NIC) to create an organizational culture within the division that was committed to using evidence-based practices. Lessons learned from this collaboration are also covered. This document is comprised of six sections: what the BJA and NIC technical assistance providers worked on with DOP, and how their work fit with other pilot programs, initiatives, and philanthropic support; what is unique about DOP from the perspective of Federal agencies that engage in technical assistance with local agencies; what is unique about what the partners brought to the table, what kind of technical assistance approach they developed together, and how it was managed and delivered; how the Federal agencies’ technical assistance advanced DOP’s EBPP goals; where New York City’s DOP evidence-based practice work is taking the department; and conclusion--what the rest of the field can learn from the DOP, BJA, and NIC technical assistance collaborative partnership, and why it does matter.

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  • Tracking State Prison Growth in 50 States

    Tracking State Prison Growth in 50 States Cover
    Tracking State Prison Growth in 50 States

    If you are looking for an excellent primer on the use of incarceration in the United States, you need to read this. "Over the last three decades of the 20th century, the United States engaged in an unprecedented prison-building boom that has given our nation the highest incarceration rate in the world. Among people with experience in criminal justice policy matters, the “hockey stick curve” of the national incarceration rate is well known; but until now more detailed data on the incarceration rates for individual states has been harder to come by. This briefing fills the gap with a series of more than 100 graphs showing prison growth (and sometimes decline) for every state in the nation to encourage states to confront how their criminal policy choices undermine our national welfare." The webpage explains with text and easily understood graphics: state policies that drive mass incarceration; what's the critical difference between incarceration rates and incarceration numbers; state prison incarceration rates for select states and overall; and state prison incarceration states by region (greater use to least)—south, west, midwest, and northeast.

    This brief refers to the "50 State Incarceration Profiles" interactive map which is a great resource for seeing how the incarceration rate has grown over time and what racial disparities exist for each state.

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  • Juvenile Justice Information Exchange (JIIE)

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    Juvenile Justice Information Exchange (JIIE)

    This is the go to place for current information about juvenile justice issues. Anyone working with juvenile offenders should visit this website.

    "The Juvenile Justice Information Exchange (JJIE) is the only publication covering juvenile justice and related issues nationally on a consistent, daily basis. In the past, traditional journalism organizations filled this function. Today, due to shrinking resources, there are large gaps in that coverage. The Juvenile Justice Information Exchange fills the void. Focused not just on delivering information, but rather on an “exchange” of ideas, the Juvenile Justice Information Exchange fosters a community of support around the issues facing the youth of our country … Doing what is best for children means staying well informed on governmental policies and legislation, court rulings, educational trends, treatment, research, prevention programs and other factors that impact the quality of service delivered to the kids that need them most."

    Points of access at this website include: news—brain development, legislation, education, parenting, and the system; policy news; ideas and opinions; Bokeh—the JJIE Photo Blog (multimedia and young journalist reports); story series; and tweets.

    The crown jewel of this site is the Juvenile Justice Resource Hub. It provides "[r]eady access to reliable, accurate, curated information and analysis on juvenile justice issues" for the content areas of evidence-based practices, mental health and substance use disorders, community-based alternatives, juvenile indigent defense, and race-ethnic fairness. Each area contains sections on key issues, reform trends, resources, experts in the field, and a glossary.

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  • The Growth of Incarceration in the United States: Exploring Causes and Consequences

    The Growth of Incarceration in the United States: Exploring Causes and Consequences Cover
    The Growth of Incarceration in the United States: Exploring Causes and Consequences

    "After decades of stability from the 1920s to the early 1970s, the rate of imprisonment in the United States more than quadrupled during the last four decades. The U.S. penal population of 2.2 million adults is by far the largest in the world. Just under one-quarter of the world's prisoners are held in American prisons. The U.S. rate of incarceration, with nearly 1 out of every 100 adults in prison or jail, is 5 to 10 times higher than the rates in Western Europe and other democracies. The U.S. prison population is largely drawn from the most disadvantaged part of the nation's population: mostly men under age 40, disproportionately minority, and poorly educated. Prisoners often carry additional deficits of drug and alcohol addictions, mental and physical illnesses, and lack of work preparation or experience. The growth of incarceration in the United States during four decades has prompted numerous critiques and a growing body of scientific knowledge about what prompted the rise and what its consequences have been for the people imprisoned, their families and communities, and for U.S. society. [The report] examines research and analysis of the dramatic rise of incarceration rates and its affects. This study makes the case that the United States has gone far past the point where the numbers of people in prison can be justified by social benefits and has reached a level where these high rates of incarceration themselves constitute a source of injustice and social harm."

    Chapters following an executive summary are: introduction; rising incarceration rates; policies and practices contributing to high rates of incarceration; the underlying causes of rising incarceration—crime, politics, and social change; the crime prevention effects of incarceration; the experience of imprisonment; consequences for health and mental health; consequences for employment and earnings; consequences for families and children; consequences for communities; wider consequences for U.S. society; the prison in society—values and principles; findings, conclusions, and implications.

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  • Justifiable Homicides by Law Enforcement Officers: What is the Role of Mental Illness?

    Justifiable Homicides by Law Enforcement Officers: What is the Role of Mental Illness? Cover
    Justifiable Homicides by Law Enforcement Officers: What is the Role of Mental Illness?

    "As a consequence of the failed mental illness treatment system, an increasing number of individuals with untreated serious mental illness are encountering law enforcement officers, sometimes with tragic results. “Justifiable homicides,” [arrest-related deaths (ARDs)] in which an individual is killed by a law enforcement officer in the line of duty, may occur when criminals are being pursued, as in a bank robbery, or when an officer is threatened with a weapon, in other situations" (p. 3). This report examines the available information about justifiable homicides and concludes with recommendations for addressing critical issues involving the transfer of responsibility for mentally ill individuals from mental health professionals to law enforcement personnel.

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  • Creating A Place Of Healing and Forgiveness: The Trauma-Informed Care Initiative at the Women’s Community Correctional Center of Hawaii

    Creating A Place Of Healing and Forgiveness: The Trauma-Informed Care Initiative at the Women’s Community Correctional Center of Hawaii Cover
    Creating A Place Of Healing and Forgiveness: The Trauma-Informed Care Initiative at the Women’s Community Correctional Center of Hawaii

    "Recognizing that most inmates are trauma survivors and many common prison routines can re-traumatize women, the Women’s Community Correctional Center of Hawaii, under the leadership of Warden Mark Kawika Patterson, works to create “a place of healing and forgiveness” [pu'uhonua] through its Trauma- Informed Care Initiative (TICI) … Reducing the use of restraints and isolation has been a focus of the training and activities of TICI, since these interventions are likely to re-traumatize women who are trauma survivors and cause trauma responses in women who had not previously experienced trauma" (p. 1). Sections of this publication include: program-at-a-glance; WCCC inmate demography; what trauma is; some potential sources of trauma; trauma's effects on individuals; the consequences of historical trauma; institutional practices can re-traumatize; healing from trauma; planning and implementing the WCCC Trauma-Informed Care Initiative—needs assessment, planning, training on trauma-informed care, and strategic planning; TICI accomplishments—trauma screening and assessment, workforce development, and the use of trauma-informed practices to reduce seclusion and restraint; resources to build the pu'uhonua; keys to success—inspirational leadership, becoming a learning organization, survival participation, community involvement, and partnering with other government agencies, academia, and community-based non-profits.

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  • Prisoners with HIV/AIDS [Parts 1 and 2]

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    Prisoners with HIV/AIDS [Parts 1 and 2]

    This article is a great overview of the legal issues related to prisoners that test positive for the HIV virus and those with AIDS. “Prisoners with HIV/AIDS are ubiquitous in today’s lockups, detention centers, jails, and prisons. Courts have addressed a variety of issues over the years about the treatment and handling of such prisoners. This two-part article takes a brief look at five specific areas that have come up fairly frequently” (p. 301). Part 1 begins with an introduction to the issue then discusses segregation, and medical care. Part 2 covers privacy, discrimination, protection from assault, claims by other prisoners, and some concluding suggestions.

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  • Maximizing Medicaid: An Innovative Approach to Finance Health Care for Criminal Justice Populations [Webinar]

    Maximizing Medicaid: An Innovative Approach to Finance Health Care for Criminal Justice Populations [Webinar] Cover
    Maximizing Medicaid: An Innovative Approach to Finance Health Care for Criminal Justice Populations [Webinar]

    "This webinar explains and clarifies the issues related to allowable uses of federal Medicaid funds for incarcerated individuals, and provides an example of how corrections departments can leverage cost savings as a result. The discussion focuses on the challenges related to implementation and establishment of cross-agency collaboration, and the subsequent successes and cost savings that can be achieved." The agenda of this webinar is: "Introduction" by Fred Osher; "Financing Health Care for Individuals Involved in the Criminal Justice System" by Gabrielle de la Gueronniere; "An Introduction to Medicaid Eligibility and the Application Process" by Terri L. Catlett, Larry Huggins, and William Appel; and "Moderated Q&A Session" moderated by Osher.

    Mixed Media
  • Responding to the Needs of Women Veterans Involved in the Criminal Justice System

    Responding to the Needs of Women Veterans Involved in the Criminal Justice System Cover
    Responding to the Needs of Women Veterans Involved in the Criminal Justice System

    "As criminal justice practitioners, we need to understand that the issues facing women veterans in the justice system may be complex as a result of untreated trauma, mental illness, and substance abuse, and their unique military experiences. We must better prepare ourselves to respond. This document highlights the unique experiences and needs of women veterans who become justice-involved and offers a gender and trauma informed approach that criminal justice practitioners can use to more effectively manage this population" (p. 2). Sections of this publication include: introduction; understanding the challenges facing justice-involved women veterans; symptoms of military sexual trauma (MST); identifying and addressing the needs of these offenders; veteran screening questions to add to established criminal justice intake and assessment processes; barriers to getting women veterans the services they need; and expectations for the future related to promising national initiatives focused on justice-involved veterans.

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  • Using Trauma-Informed Practices to Enhance Safety and Security in Women’s Correctional Facilities

    Using Trauma-Informed Practices to Enhance Safety and Security in Women’s Correctional Facilities cover
    Using Trauma-Informed Practices to Enhance Safety and Security in Women’s Correctional Facilities

    "In the wake of significant research on trauma and the interventions required to address it, a number of correctional agencies have made efforts to increase the use of trauma-based services and curricula … This document provides a brief overview of trauma and its effects on women offenders, and specifically defines trauma-informed practices for women’s correctional facilities.3 It also provides key actions that facility administrators, managers, and staff can take to better align their operational practices with the research on trauma and to create a more trauma-informed facility culture" (p. 1-2). This publication contains these sections: introduction; what we know about the experience of trauma among women inmates; trauma's impact on brain and body; what the prevalence of trauma among females means for women's correctional institutions; what the benefits of creating a more trauma-informed institutional culture are; creating a trauma-informed culture in women's correctional facilities; opportunities for implementing trauma-informed practices in correctional settings; eight action steps for building a trauma-informed facility culture; and conclusion.

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  • Briefing Paper: The Dangerous Overuse of Solitary Confinement in the United States

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    Briefing Paper: The Dangerous Overuse of Solitary Confinement in the United States

    This is an excellent resource for understanding current findings regarding solitary confinement and the potential challenges your agency may face. "Over the last two decades, the use of solitary confinement in U.S. correctional facilities has surged. Before 1990, “supermax” prisons were rare. Now, 44 states and the federal government have supermax units, where prisoners are held in extreme isolation, often for years or even decades. On any given day in this country, it’s estimated that over 80,000 prisoners are held in isolated confinement … As fiscal realities are forcing us to cut budgets for things like health and education, it is time to ask whether we should continue to use solitary confinement despite its high fiscal and human costs. This briefing paper provides an overview of the excessive use of solitary confinement in the U.S. and strategies for safely restricting its use." Sections of this publication cover: what solitary confinement is; how solitary confinement affects people; the impact of solitary confinement in people with mental illness; the people who are held in solitary confinement; whether children are ever held in solitary confinement; whether solitary confinement makes prison safer; whether solitary confinement is cost-effective; whether solitary confinement makes the public safer; and better alternatives—federal and state reforms. "Laws Limiting or Requiring Study of Solitary Confinement" and "Pending or Recently Proposed (2013 or 2014) Solitary Confinement Reform Bills" are appended.

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  • Cost-Benefit Analysis of Adult Drug Courts

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    Cost-Benefit Analysis of Adult Drug Courts

    “This Issue Review provides a summary of national and Iowa research on the effectiveness of Adult Drug Courts, an overview of these programs currently operating in Iowa, including a description of offenders served and funding mechanisms, an analysis of the costs and benefits of the Adult Drug Courts operated by Community-Based Corrections, and the estimated need for funding” (p. 1). Sections of this report cover: the current situation in Iowa—funding history, offenders and risk, admissions, closures, and recidivism; cost-benefit analysis—Iowa Results First program, and program fidelity; and budget impact. Every $1.00 spent on the program results in $9.61 in benefits over ten years.

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  • Transforming Rehabilitation: A Summary of Evidence on Reducing Reoffending

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    Transforming Rehabilitation: A Summary of Evidence on Reducing Reoffending

    “This summary provides an overview of key evidence relating to reducing the reoffending of adult offenders … [it] outlines evidence on factors associated with reoffending as well as desistance. It also presents evidence on aspects of general offender management and supervision, and on particular interventions and approaches that can reduce reoffending” (p. 1). Sections of this report include: introduction; reoffending and desistance; working effectively with offenders; evidence on reducing reoffending for drug misuse, alcohol misuse, accommodation needs, employment needs, mental health problems, behavior programs, developing and enhancing family relationships, negative peer relationships, restorative justice conferencing, and mentoring; and conclusions. Appendixes cover: further information about links to reoffending; sources of data and research evidence on offenders and recidivism; prevalence of factors commonly associated with reoffending; and standards of evidence.

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  • Safeguarding Children of Arrested Parents

    Safeguarding Children of Arrested Parents Cover
    Safeguarding Children of Arrested Parents

    "Law enforcement agencies will find the information contained in this document highly instructive as they seek to enhance their policies and procedures and gain understanding about the trauma children experience when law enforcement carries out its investigative and arrest responsibilities." This publication is made up of two parts. "Concepts and Issues Paper": introduction; definitions; the number of children affected; legal responsibilities of law enforcement for children of arrested parents; and policy and procedures—overarching policy, interagency coordination and training, per-arrest planning, making an arrest, appropriate placement of a child, booking, follow-up visits, and documentation. "Model Policy": policy; purpose; definitions; and procedures.

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  • National Inventory of the Collateral Consequences of Conviction

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    National Inventory of the Collateral Consequences of Conviction

    “Persons convicted of crime are subject to a wide variety of legal and regulatory sanctions and restrictions in addition to the sentence imposed by the court. These so- called “collateral consequences” of conviction have been promulgated with little coordination in disparate sections of state and federal codes, which makes it difficult for anyone to identify all of the penalties and disabilities that are triggered by conviction of a particular offense … Through the National Inventory, each jurisdiction’s collateral consequences will be made accessible to the public through a website that can be searched and sorted by categories and keywords. The website will make it possible for criminal and civil lawyers to determine which collateral consequences are triggered by particular categories of offenses, for affected individuals to understand the limits on their rights and opportunities, and for lawmakers and policy advocates to understand the full measure of a jurisdiction’s sanctions and disqualifications. It will also be possible through the website to perform inter-jurisdictional comparisons and national analyses.” Points of entry include: project description; User Guide Frequently Asked Questions; links to a bibliography and additional resources; and contact information.

    Web Page
  • Reentry Matters: Strategies and Successes of Second Chance Act Grantees Across the United States

    Reentry Matters: Strategies and Successes of Second Chance Act Grantees Across the United States Cover
    Reentry Matters: Strategies and Successes of Second Chance Act Grantees Across the United States

    If your agency is looking for ideas on how to provide effective reentry services then this report is a great place to start. The program snapshots "illustrate the positive impact these reentry initiatives can have by focusing on areas vital to reintegration back into the community … Representing a wide range of populations served, these programs also demonstrate the diversity of approaches that can address recidivism and increase public safety” (p. 1). Programs are described that: support employment and job readiness; build strong foundations through education; foster positive relationships and facilitating services through mentoring; address substance abuse and mental health needs; support youth to avert future involvement in the criminal justice system; address the distinct needs of women; support the strengths and needs of families; and serve tribes and reservations with culturally-relevant programs.

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  • Interventions for Adult Offenders With Serious Mental Illness

    Interventions for Adult Offenders With Serious Mental Illness Cover
    Interventions for Adult Offenders With Serious Mental Illness

    This report is a great introduction to strategies for treating offenders with serious mental illness (i.e., schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, bipolar disorder, or major depression) in jails, prisons, forensic hospitals, or community reentry programs. The researchers “identified some promising treatments for individuals with serious mental illness during incarceration or during transition from incarceration to community settings. Treatment with antipsychotics other than clozapine appears to improve psychiatric symptoms more than clozapine in an incarceration setting. Two interventions, discharge planning with Medicaid-application assistance and integrated dual disorder treatment programs, appear to be effective interventions for seriously mentally ill offenders transitioning back to the community” (p. vii).

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  • PREA Audit Instrument – Lockups

    PREA Audit Instrument – Lockups Cover
    PREA Audit Instrument – Lockups

    “These documents comprise the instrument that auditors will use to audit the U.S. Department of Justice's PREA Standards for Lockups.” Elements comprising this instrument are: “Pre-Audit Questionnaire”; “Auditor Compliance Tool” used to determine PREA compliance; “Instructions for PREA Audit Tour” of the facility; “Interview Protocols” for agency head or designee, facility director or designee, PREA Coordinator, specialized staff, random staff, and detainees: “Auditor Summary Report” template; “Process Map” describing the audit process from start to finish; and “Checklist of Documentation”.

    Mixed Media
  • PREA - Prisons and Jails

    PREA Audit Instrument – Prisons and Jails Cover
    PREA - Prisons and Jails

    “These documents comprise the instrument that auditors will use to audit the U.S. Department of Justice's PREA Standards for Prisons and Jails, pending final revisions.” Elements comprising this instrument are: “Process Map” describing the audit process from start to finish; “Checklist of Documentation”; “Pre-Audit Questionnaire”; “Auditor Compliance Tool” used to determine PREA compliance; “Instructions for PREA Audit Tour” of the facility; “Interview Protocols” for Agency Head or Designee, Warden or Designee, PREA Compliance Manager/Coordinator, Specialized Staff, General Staff, and Inmates/Detainees: “Auditor Report” template; and the “PREA Compliance Measures Handbook: Prisons and Jails”.

    Mixed Media
  • PREA Audit Instrument – Juvenile Facilities

    PREA Audit Instrument – Juvenile Facilities Cover
    PREA Audit Instrument – Juvenile Facilities

    These documents comprise the instrument that auditors will use to audit the U.S. Department of Justice's PREA Standards for Juvenile Faculties.” Elements comprising this instrument are: Pre-Audit Questionnaire; Auditor Compliance Tool used to determine PREA compliance; Instructions for PREA Audit Tour of the facility; Interview Protocols for agency head or designee, Superintendent or designee, PREA Compliance Manager/Coordinator, specialized staff, random staff, and residents; Auditor Summary Report” template; Process Map describing the audit process from start to finish; and Checklist of Documentation.

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  • PREA Audit Instrument – Community Confinement Facilities

    PREA Audit Instrument – Community Confinement Facilities cover
    PREA Audit Instrument – Community Confinement Facilities

    “These documents comprise the instrument that auditors will use to audit the U.S. Department of Justice's PREA Standards for Juvenile Faculties.” Elements comprising this instrument are: “Pre-Audit Questionnaire”; “Auditor Compliance Tool” used to determine PREA compliance; “Instructions for PREA Audit Tour” of the facility; “Interview Protocols” for agency head or designee, facility director or designee, PREA Coordinator, specialized staff, random staff, and residents; “Auditor Summary Report” template; "Process Map” describing the audit process from start to finish; and “Checklist of Documentation”.

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  • Volunteers and Interns in the Department of Corrections

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    Volunteers and Interns in the Department of Corrections

    Procedures for permitting “volunteers and public visitors to provide a number of direct services to inmates, as well as serving as a link between the Department and the community” are explained. This policy covers: general procedures; operation of volunteer and intern programs; volunteer and public visitor information; student internship and practicum; and the canine service provider program.

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  • Hope Behind Bars: An Advocate’s Guide to Helping Survivors of Sexual Abuse in Detention

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    Hope Behind Bars: An Advocate’s Guide to Helping Survivors of Sexual Abuse in Detention

    Rape crisis advocates and other victim services providers need to read this publication. It is full of vital information these professionals need in order to address the needs of victims who have been sexually assaulted in a correctional facility. “This manual aims to help advocates take advantage of the unprecedented opportunity created by the PREA [Prison Rape Elimination Act] standards. It also seeks to anticipate some of the challenges that come with helping survivors who are incarcerated. While the core principles that underpin crisis services remain the same in any setting, many advocates have limited experience providing services inside prisons and jails. The manual addresses the ways in which detention facilities are culturally distinctive, how this culture can make it difficult to deliver services to inmates, and what advocates can do to overcome these obstacles” (p. 37). Sections comprising this report are: introduction; an overview of sexual abuse behind bars; the importance of advocates; overcoming barriers to providing service behind bars; guiding principles to serving survivors in custody; hospital accompaniment for survivors; hotline services for inmates; prisoner correspondence; in-person services in detention settings; and conclusion.

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  • Glitter Political: GLBT or LGBT?

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    Glitter Political: GLBT or LGBT?

    Are you confused whether to use GLBT or LGBT? Then this short video is for you. "Columnist Jade Esteban Estrada (San Antonio Current) chats with Judy Reeves, co-founder of Houston's Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) about her perspective on the on-going branding battle between the GLBT (Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender) and the LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender) sets."

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  • Excited Delirium and the Dual Response: Preventing In-Custody Deaths

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    Excited Delirium and the Dual Response: Preventing In-Custody Deaths

    "Excited delirium syndrome (ExDS) is a serious and potentially deadly medical condition involving psychotic behavior, elevated temperature, and an extreme fight-or-flight response by the nervous system. Failure to recognize the symptoms and involve emergency medical services (EMS) to provide appropriate medical treatment may lead to death … Law enforcement organizations should take steps to increase officer awareness of ExDS and its symptoms and develop procedures to engage the medical community when identified. Without placing themselves or others at a greater risk for physical harm, officers must be able to rapidly detect symptoms of ExDS and immediately engage EMS for proper diagnosis and medical treatment. Failure to do so may prove fatal" (p. 1). Sections of this article include: historical data and cases reviewed— excited delirium-associated death after handcuffing/hog-tying, after major physical struggle, after TASER use, and with no police presence; medical background to ExDS; clinical presentation—distinct and recognizable features; treatments—control, medical assessment, and the potential for ketamine use; and conclusion.

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  • Fewer Prisoners, Less Crime: A Tale of Three States

    Fewer Prisoners, Less Crime: A Tale of Three States Cover
    Fewer Prisoners, Less Crime: A Tale of Three States

    "Although the pace of criminal justice reform has accelerated at both the federal and state levels in the past decade, current initiatives have had only a modest effect on the size of the prison population. But over this period, three states – New York, New Jersey, and California – have achieved prison population reductions in the range of 25%. They have also seen their crime rates generally decline at a faster pace than the national average" (p. 1). This brief describes how these outcomes were achieved and explains other states can significantly reduce their prison population while ensuring public safety. Sections contained in this brief are: key findings; a decade of evolving criminal justice reform; limited impact on incarceration to date; substantial prison population declines in three states; impact of prison populations reductions on crime; policies and practices that reduced the prison population in the three states; the limited relationship between incarceration and crime; international experience in prison population reduction; potential for substantial prison population reductions; three goals for expanding prison population reduction; and conclusion.

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  • NCCD Compares Juvenile Justice Risk Assessment Instruments: A Summary of the OJJDP-Funded Study

    NCCD Compares Juvenile Justice Risk Assessment Instruments: A Summary of the OJJDP-Funded Study Cover
    NCCD Compares Juvenile Justice Risk Assessment Instruments: A Summary of the OJJDP-Funded Study

    The results from a study of eight risk assessments used for determining which justice-involved youth are low-, moderate-, or high-risk for future delinquency are reviewed. Sections comprising this summary are: introduction; comparison of juvenile justice risk assessment instruments by agency, risk assessment model, and effectiveness; inter-rate reliability testing; validity and equity testing; and implications for practice. Risk assessment should be a simple process that is easily understood and articulated. This study’s findings show that simple, straightforward, actuarial approaches to risk assessment can produce the strongest results (p. 5).

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  • “Give Us Free”: Addressing Racial Disparities in Bail Determinations

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    “Give Us Free”: Addressing Racial Disparities in Bail Determinations

    “This article considers racial disparities that occur nationally in the bail determination process, due in large part to the lack of uniformity, resources, and information provided to officials in bail proceedings. It argues that the almost unbridled decision making power afforded to bail officials is often influenced by improper considerations such as the defendant’s financial resources or the race of the defendant. As a result of these failures, the bail determination process has resulted not only in racial inequalities in bail and pretrial detention decisions, but also in the over-incarceration of pretrial defendants and the overcrowding of jails nationwide. The article looks to the example of the ongoing work of criminal justice officials in Saint Louis County, Minnesota to address racial disparities in bail determinations in their county.” (p. 919). This article is divided into four parts. Part I—Bail Determinations: Federal and State Laws and Practices. Part II—Racial Disparities in Bail Determinations: the first generation studies of race and bail from 1970-200; the second generation from 2001-2012; and the cause of racial disparities in bail determinations. Part III—The Racial Justice Improvement Project and Pretrial Racial Justice Reform. Part IV—A Formula for Pretrial Justice Reform: Lessons Learned from Duluth and Beyond.

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  • Facilitating Access to Health Care Coverage for Juvenile Justice-Involved Youth

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    Facilitating Access to Health Care Coverage for Juvenile Justice-Involved Youth

    Anyone dealing with the provision of services to justice-involved youth should read this publication. “This report outlines federal and state eligibility, enroll¬ment, and outreach strategies that can help facilitate seamless coverage for system-involved youth. Adoption of these initiatives has the potential to improve the lives of juvenile justice-involved youth and their families, increase their ability to remain in the community, and ultimately, reduce recidivism. Key to the success of these strategies will be ongoing collaboration between the multiple state and federal agencies that interact with the juvenile justice population” (p. 7). Sections of this publication discuss: Medicaid eligibility options to ease community reentry—suspending eligibility, continuous eligibility, presumptive eligibility, and special enrollment procedures (Oregon, Colorado, and Texas); implications of health reform for juvenile justice-involved youth—eligibility and enrollment policies; emerging issues—transitions in coverage between Medicaid, CHIP (Children's Health Insurance Program) and exchanges; and evidence based practices for meeting the needs of juvenile justice-involved youth.

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  • The Choice is Yours: Early Implementation of a Diversion Program for Felony Offenders

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    The Choice is Yours: Early Implementation of a Diversion Program for Felony Offenders

    “In an effort to introduce approaches that reduce both recidivism and court costs, Philadelphia District Attorney (DA) Seth Williams spearheaded the development and testing of an alternative-to-incarceration program for first-time, nonviolent felony drug dealers facing one to two-year minimum mandatory state prison sentences. The program, known as The Choice is Yours (TCY), diverts these offenders away from prison into both 1) TCY court (essentially a problem-solving Philadelphia Municipal Court featuring a dedicated judge who has repeated contact with program participants to monitor their progress and motivate compliance using rewards and sanctions and 2) a suite of community-based social services and supports directed by JEVS Human Services (JEVS) and their partner agencies, the Pennsylvania Prison Society (PPS) and the Center for Literacy (CFL)” (p 1). Sections of this report include: introduction; the Choice is Yours program model—eligibility determinations, TYC Court, TYC community-based program (orientation phase, enrollment phase, and graduation), and the connection between stakeholders; TCY participants—who they are, early successes, program completion, program services, employment and education, and recidivism; key lessons learned from early implementation—communication, ongoing data collection, analysis, and reflection; and conclusion with final thoughts. The re-arrest rate for program graduates is 4.6 percent.

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  • FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS SERIES: Strategies for Identifying Defendants WhoAre Veterans for Potential Participation in Veterans Court Programs

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    FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS SERIES: Strategies for Identifying Defendants WhoAre Veterans for Potential Participation in Veterans Court Programs

    Are you looking for some ideas on how to identify potential participants for your veteran drug court? This this is a great place to start. “This FAQ presents a compilation of responses received from veterans court programs to the following question: (1) How do you identify defendants who are veterans and potentially eligible for your veterans court program? (2) Is there any systematic process that has been put in place to screen arrestees to identify those who are veterans?” Attachments to this document are: Veterans Court Criteria (Placer County, CA); Memorandum on the Pretrial Diversion of Veterans (Trial Court of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, District Court Department”; Probation Protocol for Enforcement of Veterans’ Pretrial Diversion Program Pursuant to the Valor Act (MA); and Valor Act Form (MA).

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  • Criminal Records, Race and Redemption

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    Criminal Records, Race and Redemption

    “Poor individuals of color disproportionately carry the weight of a criminal record. They confront an array of legal and non-legal barriers, the most prominent of which are housing and employment … To address these issues, this article proposes a redemption-focused approach to criminal records. This approach recognizes that individuals ultimately move past their interactions with the criminal justice system and, therefore, they should no longer be saddled by their criminal records. Thus, the article calls for greatly expanding laws that allow individuals to remove their criminal records from public access and, in the end, allow them to reach redemption” (p. 963). This article is divided into four parts. Part I—Race and Criminal Records. Part II—Criminal Records, Housing, and Employment. Part III—Federal, State, and Local Efforts to ameliorate the impact of criminal records—the Federal Interagency Reentry Council; Department of Housing and Urban Development; the Equal Employment Opportunity; and state and local efforts to “Ban the Box Movement”. And Part IV—the need for a redemptive-focused approach to criminal records”—the inadequacy of existing efforts to ameliorate; the impact of a criminal record; and the redemptive-focused approach.

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  • Jails in Indian Country, 2013

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    Jails in Indian Country, 2013

    This report presents "findings from the 2013 Survey of Jails in Indian Country, an enumeration of 79 jails, confinement facilities, detention centers, and other correctional facilities operated by tribal authorities or the Bureau of Indian Affairs. This report examines the trends from 2000 to 2013 in the number of adults and juveniles held, type of offense, number of persons confined on the last weekday in June, peak population, average daily population, admissions in June, and expected average length of stay in jail at admission. It also provides data on rated capacity, facility crowding, and jail staffing in June 2013. In addition, it provides counts of inmate deaths and suicide attempts for the 12-month period ending June 30, 2013 and compares to counts in prior years." There was a 3.3% decrease in the total inmate population from 2012 to 2013.

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  • Reentry Survival Manual

    Reentry Survival Manual Cover
    Reentry Survival Manual

    While each chapter lists the various organizations that will assist ex-offenders in Lafayette Parish, other correctional agencies will find the in depth explanations of what issues impact the chapter's topic very useful for their efforts to develop or update their own reentry guides. "This Reentry Survival Manual was created to strengthen your skills and help you overcome any barriers that you may face as you return to the community. The Lafayette Parish Sheriff‘s office is dedicated to supporting you as you strive to successfully make your return from incarceration back to your family and community. We encourage you to study and take advantage of this resource packet. We hope that you keep an open mind and positive outlook towards this learning experience. Best of luck to you, we hope you lead a happy life as you go back to your family and friends with a renewed outlook on life" (p. 2). Fourteen chapters are contained in this manual: identification and primary documents; housing; employment; careers; work ethics; transportation; money management; education; Incarcerated Veterans' Program; substance abuse and mental health; family and friend relationships; child support; restorative justice and victim awareness; and living under supervision. This manual also contains: a great flowchart showing how an offender moves through the Lafayette Parish corrections system en route to release; a Reentry Checklist of things the inmate needs to do before release; an exercise helping the offender to determine what things may be a potential barrier to a successful transition to the community; and a checklist for helping the offender plan their personal reentry plan.

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  • Post-Conviction Victim Service Providers: Selected Resources Annotated Bibliography

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    Post-Conviction Victim Service Providers: Selected Resources Annotated Bibliography

    Victims have statutory rights that begin the moment a crime is committed against them. Ideally, victims would be fully informed of their rights at every step in the process: at the time the crime is reported, during the justice process, while the offender is incarcerated, and when the offender reenters the community. Different criminal justice stakeholders are responsible for victim services at different stages of this process. National Institute of Corrections’ project, “Post-Conviction Victim Service Providers” will focus on victim services, such as corrections, reentry, parole, and probation, that occur after an offender has been convicted, and it will provide resources and information for those working in this important, but rarely recognized, area of corrections.

    This annotated bibliography was developed in an effort to provide current and useful information to professionals working in and with the criminal justice system regarding services that are provided to victims of crime. Sections include: general resources; confidentiality; evidence based practice (EBP); juveniles; notification; parole and parole boards; policies and legal issues; restitution; safety planning; social media; statistics and data; victim impact; victim offender communication, dialogue, and mediation; victim rights; victim support and services; and related websites.

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  • Gang & Youth Violence Interventions: A Review of Research and Literature Addressing Evidence-Based and Promising Practices for Gang-Affiliated and Violent Youth in Juvenile Institutions and Detention Centers

    Gang & Youth Violence Interventions: A Review of Research and Literature Addressing Evidence‐Based and Promising Practices for Gang‐Affiliated and Violent Youth in Juvenile Institutions and Detention Centers Cover
    Gang & Youth Violence Interventions: A Review of Research and Literature Addressing Evidence-Based and Promising Practices for Gang-Affiliated and Violent Youth in Juvenile Institutions and Detention Centers

    "A large percentage of Washington’s gang-affiliated and violent youth spend at least some time in Washington’s juvenile institutions or county detention centers (or both). The multiple problems and aggressive tendencies of these youth can create safety issues inside residential facilities, and can prevent youth from moving beyond detention to more pro-social and productive lives. For these reasons, Washington’s Juvenile Rehabilitation Administration [JRA] commissioned this report to determine which evidence-based practices [EBPs] and promising practices work best for serious juvenile offenders, and what factors need to be considered when implementing best practices" (p. 1). Since a wide range of effective programming for juvenile gang members and/or violent juvenile offenders is examined, this report is important reading for anyone working with this juvenile population. Six parts follow an executive summary: JRA and juvenile justice in Washington State; youth gangs and violent juvenile offenders; evidence-based practices—cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) programs, family-focused programs, and other programs; promising practices—multiple services programs, substance abuse treatment programs, mentoring programs, academic and employment programs, staff training programs, and others; key factors for program success; and discussion and conclusions. Appendixes provide; additional information about EBPs covered in Part III; and additional information and resources regarding the promising programs described in Part IV.

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  • A Guidebook for Incarcerated Veterans in Wisconsin|Revised [edition]

    A Guidebook for Incarcerated Veterans in Wisconsin Cover
    A Guidebook for Incarcerated Veterans in Wisconsin|Revised [edition]

    'This booklet is a tool for Incarcerated Veterans and their families who may want access to support services that promote a better and new manner of living.' When these programs are used properly, the benefits may help to minimize the outside pressures incarcerated veterans experience when released. This guidebook addresses the process of economics, social acceptance and reestablishment for incarcerated veterans as they return to society' (p. iii). Sections of this document include: using this guide and seeking help; help for veterans; seeking federal benefits; Wisconsin Department of Veterans Affairs; checklist'using this guide; resource address websites and phone numbers; and County Veterans Service Offices (CVSO).

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