Back to top

Intimate partner violence

"This webinar will focus on both the violence and aggression – including interpersonal and domestic violence – women have experienced as well as when they have perpetrated … Beyond Violence is the first manualized intervention for women that focuses on anger and utilizes a multi-level approach and a variety of evidence-based therapeutic strategies (i.e., psycho-education, role playing, mindfulness activities, cognitive-behavioral restructuring, and grounding skills for trauma triggers). This four-level model of violence prevention considers the complex interplay between individual, relationship, community, and societal factors. The program is designed to assist women in understanding trauma, the multiple aspects of anger, and emotional regulation." This webinar will: describe violent female offenders; define trauma-informed and gender-responsive services; describe the social-ecological model of violence; describe the theoretical foundation of Beyond Violence; discuss the evidence-base and research on Beyond Violence; and introduce the Beyond Violence curriculum.

› Justice-Involved Women: Understanding Trauma and Violence [Webinar] Cover

"This booklet looks at the recent research on intimate partner violence and analyzes what it reveals that probation officers and administrators should know to do their jobs better in terms of completing PSI [presentence investigative report] for defendants convicted of intimate partner violence, supervising abusers on their caseloads, and dealing with the victims of these abusers on probation and victims who have also ended up on probation caseloads. Although much of the research is not focused directly on probation, what it tells us about abusers, victims and the responses of law enforcement, prosecutors, and courts directly bears on probation. Other research reviewed looked specifically at probation’s response to IPV [intimate partner violence]" (p.2). Sections cover: what the research has to tell probation officers and administrators about probationers convicted of IPV or defendants awaiting sentencing reports; what the research has to tell probation about IPV victims; what the research has to tell probation about effective court criminal responses to IPV defendants; what the research has to tell Probation about effective supervision of IPV probationers; what does the research tell Probation about batterer intervention programs; and what the research has to tell probation about their role in responding to IPV.

Practical Implications of Current Domestic Violence Research for Probation Officers and Administrators Cover

This report covers research related to domestic violence. Eight sections make up this document: overview; reporting and arrests; perpetrator characteristics; victim characteristics; law enforcement responses; prosecution responses; judicial responses; and intervention programs.

Practical Implications of Current Domestic Violence Research:  For Law Enforcement, Prosecutors and Judges Cover

Pretrial rearrest among New York domestic violence (DV) defendants is examined. Sections contained in this article are: background; identifying DV and non-DV cases; offense patterns of DV and non-DV defendants; and conclusions. Since 9% of DV defendants are rearrested on a new DV offense, "victims may be at considerable risk of threats, intimidation, or retaliation during the pretrial period" (p. 38).

Pretrial Rearrests Cover

The effectiveness of domestic violence courts to positively impact court processing, case resolutions, and recidivism is examined. If you are planning to implement a domestic violence court in your jurisdiction or are looking for ways to improve it, then you should read this report. This study found that court policies “varied widely across several domains, including specific accountability measures (i.e., use of various sanctions for noncompliance), victim safety and services (e.g., use of protection orders, linkages to victim advocates, and courthouse safety measures), use of offender assessment tools, orders to batterer programs, and orders to other types of programs (e.g., substance abuse or mental health treatment)” (p. v). Findings also show that among convicted offenders domestic violence courts significantly reduce the total number of re-arrests for any charge and for additional domestic violence charges.

Testing the Effects of New York’s Domestic Violence Courts: A Statewide Impact Evaluation Cover

Articles in this issue include:

  • “Foreword” by Ken Rose
  • “A Framework for Implementing Evidence-Based Practices in Pretrial Services” by John Clark
  • “Advancing Evidence-Based Practices in the Pretrial Field” by Katie Green, Pat Smith, and Kristina Bryant
  • “Improving Pretrial Assessment and Supervision in Colorado” by Michael R. Jones and Sue Ferrere
  • “Pretrial Defendants: Are They Getting Too Much of a Good Thing?” by Barbara M. Hankey
  • “Charge Specialty and Revictimization of Defendants Charged with Domestic Violence Offenses” by Spurgeon Kennedy
  • “Pretrial Rearrests Among Domestic Violence Defendants in New York City” by Richard R. Peterson
Topics in Community Corrections, Annual Issue 2008: Applying Evidence-Based Practices in Pretrial Services Cover

"This bibliography attempts to offer a compilation of information on trauma-informed care by reviewing general information about trauma as well as focusing on the criminal justice system and corrections (women, adults, and younger people), peer support, and screening/assessment for trauma. In addition, definitions of many of these tools are provided" (p. 3). Eighty-four resources are organized into the following areas: trauma-informed care in general; trauma-informed care in the criminal justice system and in corrections; trauma-informed care for youth in the criminal justice system; peer-to-peer trauma-informed care; trauma; gender neutral screenings and assessments; and trauma and/or gender informed screenings and assessments.

Trauma Annotated Bibliography Cover

"All governments should be very concerned about domestic violence against Native women. Tribal governments across the United States are creating programs to improve response to violent crime. As sovereign governments, tribes can assert jurisdiction in criminal and civil actions involving assaults against Native women … As sovereign governments, many tribes have asserted concurrent or exclusive criminal and/or civil jurisdiction in domestic violence cases. A key piece of responding to domestic violence is to draft or revise tribal domestic violence laws. This resource guide was developed to provide a starting point for drafting or revising tribal laws on domestic violence. It is written with a philosophy that tribal laws should reflect tribal values. In addition, writing a tribal law usually requires careful consideration of how state and/or federal laws might apply in the community. This resource guide includes examples from a variety of tribal codes and discussion questions that are designed to help tribal community members decide on the best laws for your community" (p. 1). Resources are organized into the following sections: general provisions; jurisdiction—criminal or civil; criminal domestic violence statutes—defining domestic violence, role of law enforcement, role of tribal prosecutors, role of courts, evidence, victims' rights in criminal proceedings, and sanctions; protective orders—developing civil protective orders, violating protective orders, and full faith and credit; family law and child custody; and education and batterer intervention.

tribal legal code cover

If your agency is thinking of using the Duluth model you need to read this report. It explains why the Duluth model for domestic violence (DV) treatment does not reduce DV recidivism. Group treatment of DV offenders with the Duluth model and four other models (cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), relationship enhancement, substance abuse treatment, and group couples counseling) were evaluated. “Based on six rigorous outcome evaluations of group-based DV treatment for male offenders, we conclude that the Duluth model, the most common treatment approach, appears to have no effect on recidivism … There may be other group-based treatments for male DV offenders that effectively reduce DV recidivism … Unfortunately, these interventions are so varied in their approaches that we cannot identify a particular group-based treatment approach to replace the Duluth-like model required by Washington State law” (p. 12).

What Works to Reduce Recidivism by Domestic Violence Offenders? Cover

“Women who are battered by their partners are everywhere – and that includes in your local jail. Unfortunately, in many communities, jailed women are quite invisible, even to battered women’s organizations. If you are not already doing so, we want you (and other community-based advocates) to work with jailed women. Since you are reading this manual, we assume you are interested in doing work with jailed battered women, or are already doing so … Working with jailed women can be complicated and difficult. Since the women have open criminal charges or are serving sentences (and still may have open legal issues), the stakes are high. We hope this manual will encourage and guide you in thinking about ways of being thoughtful and strategic about how you approach your work with jailed battered women” (p. 1). Sections of this guide include: introduction; battered women in jail; before you begin—things to consider; defense-based advocacy; confidentiality; jail-based advocacy; overcoming barriers; advocacy fundamentals with battered women in jails; special considerations; individual advocacy; group advocacy; systems advocacy; and closing. Also included is “Advocacy Basics for Working With Battered Women Charged With Crimes.”

Working With Battered Women in Jail: A Manual for Community-Based Battered Women’s Advocates Cover

Pages

Subscribe to Intimate partner violence